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    • Washington, George
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    • Jay, John
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    • Washington, George
    • Jay, John

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Documents filtered by: Author="Washington, George" AND Recipient="Jay, John" AND Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Jay, John"
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I take the liberty of transmitting to Congress the inclosed Letter with the papers which accompany it, which I received two or three days ago from His Excellency Governor Clinton. Mr McDowel’s application seems to merit relief—whether the Barn &c. were destroyed by accident or through design. In either case the injury is the same—and may equally call for reparation by the public in the first...
The day I left Middle Brook I recd the two inclosed letters of the 8th Decemr from Major General Phillips to which I returned an answer dated the 25th which you have also inclosed. I imagined this would have put an end to any further applications of the same nature. But I yesterday recd the inclosed letters from Lord Stirling and Mr McHenry one of my Secretarys by which you will perceive that...
Colonel Rawlins who as well as his officers in general distinguished himself at the affair of Fort Washington has remaining of his Regiment about fifty or sixty men and a few officers. As the latter are at present an expence to the Continent without being employed—and the Colonel after having deserved well of his Country and suffered a grievous captivity, has some claim to attention—I beg...
Philadelphia, January 27, 1779. Asks for money to carry on recruiting. States that Major General Horatio Gates has made agreements with Major General William Phillips about Convention troops. Df , in writing of H, George Washington Papers, Library of Congress.
I am to request that Congress will be pleased to give directions to have the military chest supplied with a sufficient sum of money to enable me to carry into execution their resolve of the 23 instant for recruiting the army during the war. Every moment is so precious, that it is to be wished notime may be lost in improving this important measure to the greatest advantage. In the papers from...
Philadelphia, January 29, 1779. Asks permission to return to Camp. LS , in writing of H, Papers of the Continental Congress, National Archives.
I do myself the honor to inclose you the Extract of a letter which I recd a few days ago from His Excellency Governor Clinton, and which I am to request you to lay before Congress agreeable to his desire. I have only to add that the settlement and payment of such Accounts as are referred to in the letter, is highly beneficial to our public Credit, and satisfactory to those individuals, who...
My long and unexpected stay in this city being attended with many inconveniences to the common business of the army, and in other respects—I feel myself under a necessity of requesting the permission of Congress to return; and if consistent with their views, I should be glad to set out for the camp at Middle-Brook, on monday next. There are several matters, which have been the subjects of...
In consequence of the authority vested in me by Congress of “directing and superintending the military operations in these States,” I was led to make inquiry into the State of the Magazines to the Westward. From a late letter of Genl McIntosh’s to myself, and several to the Board of War, I find that he has been so much distressed for provision, that he has been obliged suddenly to disband all...
I am honored with yours of the 3d and 5th instants with the Resolves of the 2d and 4th inclosed. I have dispatched orders to the Infantry of Count Pulaski’s Legion to march immediately from Minisink to Lancaster, at which place they will expect a Route and further orders for proceeding. The Horse of the Legion not being in this Quarter will receive orders from the Count himself. In obedience...