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    • Washington, George
    • Colfax, William

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Colfax, William"
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What Major Gibbs’s plan is—& what his present line of conduct tends to, I shall not take upon me to decide; nor shall I at this moment enquire into them—I mean to act coolly & deliberately myself, and will therefore give him an opportunity of recollecting himself. He has been guilty of a peice of disrespect; to give it no worse a term—such an one, as I much question if there is another officer...
I am sorry I have occasion to address your Excellency on a subject so disagreeable to me; or draw your attention from Objects of greater importance. Major Gibbs has inform’d me, that my conduct was such, in his absence, as has incur’d your Exclys displeasure. my surprise can only be equalled by my concern; I hope I may be able to remove every impression of that Nature. Conscious of having done...
I address your Excellency in the behalf of Mr Lee, Mr Lord, Mr Avery & myself, officers of the late 1st Connt regiment. Rather than troble Your Excellency on a subject, of all others the most disagreeable, we had concluded to receive and bear a grievance, tho’ too intolerable? But on a second view, and relying on Your Excellency’s disposition to administer justice, we deemed it our duty as...
The inclosed are the Instructions which I meant to deliver verbally, with some explanation—but—your absence has prevented it! When business or Inclination (especially on a March) calls you from your Command I should be glad to know it, that I may regulate myself, and orders accordingly. Your Rout, & every thing relative to the inclosed order, is to be kept secret till the nature of the...
Three or four Trusty men—the Woman of the Guard—the Box of papers, and such parts of my Baggage as will be particularly named to you, with all the cover’d Waggons & such others as the Q.M. Genll shall direct are to go round by Land to the Army in Virginia. The Guard—Stores & other Baggage, are to be embarked on board of some good Vessel (for which you are to apply to Genll Lincoln in time) and...
Your Sick, Invalids and weak men—Your heavy Stores, & such other articles Papers excepted as you may judge proper, are to go by Water under the care of Mr Holden, or yourself, to the head of Elk; where they are to remain till the Waggons and other parts of the Baggage go round, to that place, by Land. When the whole are united, you will, if you should not receive further orders, proceed to...
I am obliged to address you Excellency on a subject I know to be disagreeable, but my reasons, I am persuaded, will aboundantly make it appear that I am not to troblesome, without a cause. The third arrangment of the subaltern Officers of the Connt Line will be presented for your Excellency’s approbation—As an individual; & as an injured person, I protest against. Agreeable to the proceedings...
I want an acct of all expenditures—from the time we arrived at this place, till the first day of this Month. Also of every thing drawn from the Contractors during that period. I likewise desire, to have an acct of every thing else which may have been had from other Quarters, if any there be—As well Provision, Liquors, and Stores—as necessaries from the Quarter Master—these as before, from our...
It was impossible to render the accts Your Excellency demanded of me, sooner than I have—not a moments time has been lost in having them coppied and made ready to be presented, since the order was received. I have not, till now, account’d for the money I recd of your Excellency in Virginia—therefore, deem’d it necessary to go into the matter more fully than was expressed in the order—and have...