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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Washington, George" AND Correspondent="Carrington, Edward"
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Letter not found: to Edward Carrington, 12 Feb. 1796 . On 24 Feb., Carrington wrote GW: “I have been honored with your favor of the 12th Instant.”
Accompanying this, I send a Letter by post to The Secy of State. I request the favor of you if there should be a probability of its remaining two or three days in the post office at Richmond waiting the regular post to Charlottsville, or on any other accot to have it directly conveyed to mr Jefferson by Express—in which case you will be good enough to let me Know the expense which may be...
Previous to your Offer of the Office of Surveyor General to Genl Wood, some communications had taken place between you & General Marshal as to a proper person to fill that appointment which, as has been usual between him & myself, were made known to me—it was agreed in our examinations of characters within our knowledge, that Colo. Wm Heth would do great justice to the Office, and Genl...
I had the honor a few days ago to receive your Letter of the 30th Ult. enclosing a Commission for the Office of District Marshal for Virginia, together with sundry Acts upon the Judiciary system. The confidence you are pleased Sir, to repose in me, in confering this Commission, is an evidence of your good opinion exceedingly flattering and gratifying; and the terms in which you have thought...
The late Votes of the House of Representatives which have just reached us, and from which it appears that appropriations are not intended to be made for giving effect to the Treaty between the U. States and Great Britain, have in my opinion brought our political maladies to a crisis. The disorganizing machinations of a faction are no longer left to be nourished and inculcated on the minds of...
I am extremely sorry that I have not yet been enabled to give any satisfactory answer to your enquiry relating to Colo. Innes. He has not yet returned to this place; and having stoped somewhere short of Williamsburg, has been out of the way of the enquiries we have made for the purpose of ascertaining the time of his return. under this circumstance it is impossible to give you any ground...
Colo. Innes has just returned to Town and Genl Marshall, on a conversation with him, has formed an opinion favorable to his appointment to the Office of Attorney General. judging that too much time would be lost in my waiting for your notification of our powers on this subject being still in existence, we thought it best to sound him on the score of his acceptance, apprising him of the...
The meeting of the people of this City & Vicinity, of which I did myself the Honor to inform you a few days ago, as being in agitation, took place the day before yesterday, the 25th Inst. and the enclosed paper of Davis of this date, contains the proceedings of the day, also a very correct Statement of the manner in which they were conducted—While I enjoy the Satisfaction of being enabled to...
Your favor of the 10th instant has been received. Since the Refusal by General Wood of the Office of Surveyor Genl, it has been offered to General Rufus Putnam, whom it is presumed will accept it. I do not recollect that Colo. Heths name was ever presented to me for this Office—If it had, and any assurance could have been given of his scientific qualifications, he would have been an eligible...
I did myself the honor to address you by the last Mail in regard to the temper with which our assembly has convened. nothing has yet been proposed in the House on the Treaty or any other federal subject, and I am much inclined to believe the discontented party are under some doubts what they can, with prospects of Succeeding, attempt. they will probably delay their measures in order that, as...