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To George Washington from Edmund Randolph, 9 March 1795

From Edmund Randolph

March 9. 1795.

The Secretary of State has the honor of Reporting to the President, that of the fifty three Laws, passed during the late Session of Congress, the following only require his immediate attention.

1. The calling out of the Militia for the western service1—This is understood to be done.

2. The Loan of two million of dollars2—done.

3. Paying instalments of foreign debts3—done.

4. The Algerine money4—done.

5. Purveyor of supplies5—done.

6. Count de Grasse’s daughters6—belonging to the Secretary of the Treasury.

7. Advance of money to the insurgents7—belonging to the Secretary of the Treasury.

8. Military establishment8—Secretary of war.

9. Public Credit9 } an eventual power to the President, to
10. Appropriations10 be executed by the Secretary of the Treasury.

11. Survey of Galliopolis11—Secretary of the Treasury.

12. Fifty thousand dollars for Indian supplies.12

The resolution of the Senate as to the title of Georgia has been sent to the Attorney General.13

Edm: Randolph.

LB, DNA: RG 59, Reports of Secretary of State to President and Congress, entry 142.

In response to this report, GW wrote letters on 11 March to Secretary of the Treasury Oliver Wolcott, Jr., and Secretary of War Timothy Pickering: “It has been reported to me by The Secretary of State, that among the Laws of the last session of Congress, are several which require the immediate acting of The President; and he has enumerated those, of which a list is annexed, as belonging to your department. It is therefore my desire, that you lay before me, as soon as may be convenient, the mode which appears best for executing them; and that you note such of them as have been already executed. If any of those Laws contain powers to be exercised by the President, not immediately, but at a future day & eventually only, you will distinguish them in your report to me.” Wolcott was to report about items 2, 3, 4, 6, 7, 9, 10, and 11, and Pickering was to report about items 1, 8, and 12 (LS, to Wolcott, CtHi: Oliver Wolcott, Jr., Papers; L, to Pickering, DLC:GW; LB, to Wolcott, DLC:GW; LB, to Pickering, DLC:GW).

1Randolph was referring to “An Act to authorize the President to call out and station a corps of Militia, in the four western Counties of Pennsylvania, for a limited time,” 29 Nov. 1794 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 403).

2“An Act authorizing a Loan of two millions of Dollars” was approved 18 Dec. 1794 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 404).

3“An Act providing for the payment of certain instalments of foreign debts; and of the third instalment due on a loan made of the Bank of the United States,” was approved 8 Jan. 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 409).

4Randolph was referring to “An Act for the reimbursement of a Loan authorized by an Act of the last Session of Congress,” 21 Feb. 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 418). This act authorized the Bank of the United States to lend to the government the $800,000 unexpended from the act of 20 March 1794 “making further provision for the expenses attending the intercourse of the United States with foreign nations …” (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 345). Randolph had earlier proposed that that money be used to fund ransom for U.S. captives and for negotiations with Algiers (Randolph to GW, 19 July 1794, first letter).

5“An Act to establish the Office of Purveyor of Public Supplies” was approved on 23 Feb. 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 419).

6“An Act authorizing the payment of four thousand dollars for the use of the daughters of the late Count de Grasse” was approved on 27 Feb. 1795 (6 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 19–20).

7Randolph was referring to “An Act to provide some present relief to the officers of government and other citizens who have suffered in their property by the insurgents in the western counties of Pennsylvania,” 27 Feb. 1795 (6 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 20).

8“An Act for continuing and regulating the military establishment of the United States, and for repealing sundry acts heretofore passed on that subject” was approved on 3 March 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 430–32).

9“An Act making further provision for the support of Public Credit, and for the redemption of the Public Debt” was approved on 3 March 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 433–38).

10Randolph was referring to “An Act making further appropriations for the Military and Naval establishments, and for the support of Government,” 3 March 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 438–39).

11Randolph was referring to “An Act to authorize a grant of lands to the French inhabitants of Galliopolis, and for other purposes therein mentioned,” 3 March 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 442–43).

12Randolph was referring to “An Act making provision for the purposes of Trade with the Indians,” 3 March 1795 (1 Stat. description begins Richard Peters, ed. The Public Statutes at Large of the United States of America, from the Organization of the Government in 1789, to March 3, 1845 . . .. 8 vols. Boston, 1845-67. description ends 443).

13On 2 March the Senate committee appointed to consider the Georgia laws referred to in GW’s message to Congress of 25 Feb. reported a resolution “That the President of the United States be, and hereby is requested to give directions to the Attorney General to collect, digest and report to the Senate, the charters, treaties, and other documents, relative to, and explanatory of, the title to the land situate in the south western parts of the United States, and claimed by certain companies under a law of the State of Georgia passed the seventh day of January last, namely, a tract of land claimed by James Gunn, Matthew M’Allister and George Walker and their associates; also a tract of land claimed by Nicholas Long, Thomas Glascock, Ambrose Gordon and Thomas Cumming and their associates; also a tract of land claimed by John B. Scott, John C. Nightingale and Wade Hampton and their associates; and also a tract of land, claimed by Zachariah Cox and Mathias Maher and their associates.” The resolution was considered on 3 March and, after two amendments failed, passed by a vote of 19–2. The resolution was referred to the House, where, after being amended to require a report to the “next Congress” instead of just the Senate, it also passed. The Senate concurred with the change (Journal of the Senate description begins The Journal of the Senate including The Journal of the Executive Proceedings of the Senate: George Washington Administration 1789–1797. Edited by Martin P. Claussen. 9 vols. Wilmington, Del., 1977. description ends , 7:99, 110, 112; Journal of the House description begins The Journal of the House of Representatives: George Washington Administration 1789–1797. Edited by Martin P. Claussen. 9 vols. Wilmington, Del., 1977. description ends , 7:307–8). For the resulting report, see Charles Lee to John Adams, 26 April 1796, and enclosures (ASP description begins Walter Lowrie et al., eds. American State Papers. Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States. 38 vols. Washington, D.C., Gales and Seaton, 1832–61. description ends , Public Lands, 1:34–66).

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