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    • Washington, George

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Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 3 Dec. 1799. GW’s letter of 24 Nov. to Pickering is docketed by Pickering, “answd Decr 3d.”
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 5 Nov. 1799. GW wrote Pickering on 24 Nov. : “Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course.”
(Private) (& Confidential) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Oct. 24. 1799 I am this evening honoured with your letter of the 20th. When I last wrote you, I had grounds to expect, on the President’s arrival; that the mission to France would be suspended, until the fate of its government should be known. This great question I supposed (& my colleagues had formed the same expectation) would be a subject of...
(private) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Oct. 9. 1799. I received yesterday the inclosed letter from Mr Murray. The President is on his way to this place. Govr Davie has been here a week; and Mr Ellsworth writes me, in a letter recd this morning, that he will arrive himself by Friday morning. The question about the mission to France will, I expect, be then settled. The state of the President’s mind, when...
(confidential) The most ⟨satisfactory⟩ communication I have it in my power now to make, is the probability that the mission to France will at least be suspended. This morning I recd a letter dated the 26th from Judge Ellsworth, in which he says—“The following is an extract of a letter I have just ⟨been⟩ honoured with from the President—the convulsions in France, the change of the Directory,...
The inclosed I have cut from a New-York paper. It reminds me of what I have repeatedly proposed to different citizens of Philadelphia— That in order to avoid the impurities of docks partly uncovered at low water, and to preserve a sufficient depth of water for vessels to enter, & even lie afloat, the wharfing of the city should be newly arranged. For this end, fixing a curve line which should...
(confidential) Sir, Philadelphia August 2. 1799. A letter from Mr Murray of May 17 received this week, covers a letter from Talleyrand, dated May 12th, assuring him that the Executive Directory will receive the Envoys of the U. States in their official character; and that they shall enjoy all the prerogatives attached to it by the law of nations; and that one or more ministers shall be duly...
(private) Sir, Philadelphia July 18, 1799. I am honoured with your letter of the 14th. La Fayette will not come to America as a minister : On the 13th instant I received a private letter from Mr Murray dated the 16th of April, inclosing one from Pichon, dated the 12th, written with Talleyrand’s privity, and indeed by his order. Pichon is eager to be the first to announce to Murray the message...
This morning’s mail brought me your letter of the 25th. I will forward the two letters you inclosed for John Trumbull Esqr. & Mr Dandridge, to the care of Mr King, by the Grantham packet, which is to sail this week. Governor Davie of No. Carolina is appointed, and, should the mission proceed, will accept the place of Envoy to the French Republic, in the room of Patrick Henry Esqr. who...
(Confidential) Sir, Philadelphia March 11.1799 I have been honored with your letter of the 3d. The business to which it relates will I believe be put on a footing to produce less mischief than was apprehended—a footing far beyond my hopes. I have this morning received the two letters inclosed for Mr Lear and J. Dandridge Esqr. I mention in confidence, what I this morning received from Mr King,...
(private) Sir, Philadelphia Feby 28. 1799. I am happy to inform you, that altho’ the evil of the original nomination of a minister to treat with France cannot be wholly cured, it has since been palliated, by the nomination of Chief Justice Elsworth, Patrick Henry, and Mr Murray, “to be Envoys Extraordinary & ministers plenipotentiary to the French Republic, with full powers to discuss and...
(private) Sir, Philadelphia Feby 21. 1799. I have been honoured with your letter of the 21st. My letter of the 8th contained nothing that need be concealed from your friends. except when I mark a letter confidential, you will be pleased to make such use of it as you think proper. The subject of the present one is not an exception, as to your discreet friends: for I am sure no officer about the...
It will give you additional pleasure to learn that such is the increased and increasing respectability of the U. States among the European powers—that from being viewed with indifference & even contempt, our friendship and commerce are courted. The Russian minister at London has suggested to Mr King that a Commercial treaty with the U. States would be agreeable to the Emperor Paul; and added,...
Your last letters to be forwarded to Europe I expect will proceed next week. The three for England I shall put under cover to Mr King and send them by the British packet which is to sail next Wednesday or Thursday. I have the honor to inclose copies of the Presidents communications to Congress on the 18th & 21st of January, concerning French affairs. In my report, I had noticed (in as gentle...
I have been so much occupied since the receipt of your letter desiring a copy of one you wrote last year, that I have not had time to search for the original: as soon as I can I will do it, & if found, forward a copy. Your letter of the 15th covering one for Mr Murray & one for Lafayette I will take care of, and forward those two to their destination in a few days, when I shall write to Mr...
The inclosed interesting pamphlet is a faithful translation from the original French, transmitted to me by Mr King. As it details facts which demonstrate the perfidy and violence of the French Government, I had it translated, and recommended it to the printer in this place; hoping the dissemination of it in America might do good. I think the Government could expend money in no way more...
Recollecting your anxiety that General Pinckney might [not] feel satisfied with the military arrangements of General officers proposed by you, I seize the first moment to relieve you from it. This morning Mr McHenry has received from Genl Hamilton a letter dated yesterday, in which is the following passage: After mentioning the arrival of General Pinckney, Genl Hamilton says— “You will learn...
This morning I saw a New-York paper announcing the arrival of General Pinckney, & that on account of the prevailing fever, he had landed at Paulus Hook: So I expect in two or three days to have the happiness to see him. The inclosed letter I received yesterday morning, with others by the mail from New-York. I have the honor to be with great respect sir your most obt servt ALS , DLC:GW . The...
I seize the first conveyance to inform you that General Pinckney is out of France. He embarked with his family, about the middle of August, in the ship Hope, Capt. Hendrick Hendrickson, for New-York, where we may daily expect to hear of his arrival. The letter giving me this information is from a Monsieur Hory, dated at Bourdeaux the 27th of August; it came to hand last evening from Chester...
I have to-day received some letters from Mr King dated in London July 28 August 1st & 5th. By them it appears there is more than ever a prospect of a new coalition against France: but a fact, and a very important one, stated by Mr King, has chiefly induced me to write. It is this. That Austria & Naples have entered into a defensive alliance for their mutual protection against France; and...
I wrote you a hasty letter on the 13th—Upon further consideration, we have judged it most advisable that a letter should be written by Mr Wolcott alone; in order that the strong point of view in which the facts and arguments in the case may be placed, may be presented by Reason only, to which the mind yields more willingly than to formal advice, in the semblance of official authority. This is...
(private) Sir Trenton [N.J.] Sept. 13 1798. I have this moment received your favour of the 9th. Since mine of the 1st the Secretary of War has received from the President a letter deciding the ranks of the three first General Officers in question—that they shall stand, Knox—Pinckney—Hamilton. This decisive act is the more surprizing, seeing but a fortnight before the President had written to...
By William Craig Esqr. who left this place on the 22d ult. I remitted you fifteen hundred dollars, and left in Philadelphia two hundred dollars for Colo. C. Biddle; receipts are inclosed for both sums, being the seventeen hundred dollars paid me by Judge Addison for you. I gave the Judge my receipt for the same. I have the honor to be with great respect, sir, your most obt servt ALS , DLC:GW ;...
(Private) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Septr 1. 1798. On the 16th of July I was honoured with your answer of the 11th to my letter of the 6th respecting the appointment of General Officers for the New American Army; and was afterwards happy in seeing in the arrangement brought by the Secretary of War from Mount Vernon, that Colo. Hamilton’s name occupied the station in which the public voice,...
I do myself the honor to send herewith a copy of the acts of Congress of the extraordinary session in 1797, and of the late session. I have not had them bound, because it will be proper to connect those of the ensuing session with them. I am with great respect sir your most obt servt ALS , DLC:GW . The Acts of Congress for the May 1797 session perhaps was one of the volumes of the acts owned...
My attachment to my country, and my desire to promote its best interests, I trust were never equivocal: and at this time I feel extreme anxiety that our army should be organized in the most efficient manner. The enemy whom we are now preparing to encounter, veterans in arms, led by able and active officers, and accustomed to victory, must be met by the best blood, talents, energy and...
The inclosed has just come to hand with Mr King’s public letters. The publication of the instructions to our Envoys to the French Republic and their dispatches is operating admirably. The Democrats in neither House of Congress make much opposition: and out of doors, the French Devotees are rapidly quitting the worship of their idol. The long-enduring patience of the people of the U. States...
I do myself the honor to inclose copies of the instructions to and dispatches from the Envoys of the United States at Paris. No statement of the facts described in the latter can give them their proper force: but the facts as related by the envoys, with the manner and all their circumstances, carry irresistable evidence to every fair and unprejudiced mind, that this display of corruption and...
I duly received your letter of the 6th ulto and must beg your pardon for suffering it to lie so long unanswered. I have shown the letter to all my colleagues; and we are of opinion that it is neither necessary nor expedient for you publicly to contradict the false assertions of Fauchet. The villains who propagate slanders against you in this country do not believe in their own assertions: of...
In my last I forgot to mention, that Mr Nancrede from Boston, had just left with the three volumes of the Studies of Nature which he dedicated to you, without your permission, but for which you desired me to subscribe, in your behalf. I did so. But the set he has left with me for you are elegantly bound in red Morocco and gilt; and from the manner of the delivery (sending them to my house...