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Documents filtered by: Author="Lafayette, Marie-Joseph-Paul-Yves-Roch-Gilbert du Motier, marquis de" AND Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
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A Man is just Arriv’d at My quarters who says that the Cork fleet Arriv’d in Newyork on Sunday last—his informant saw himself thirty six vessels Coming up—the Man adds that Gnl Smith is gone to the City and suppos’d to embark with this late envoy of troops—But I don’t put a perfect dependance on what he says nor on the inclos’d letter he has Brought me from Merc ereau —I am sure that the...
to My Great disappointment Mr P—— is Return’d this Morning and Brings no details with him—I Wanted him to Go Again, But You alone Can induce him to do it—from what he Says, the Ennemy are going to undertake A great Movement—he will himself wait on you and tell you what had been Said to him about Rhode island, and what about improving the opportunity of theyr fleet’s going to London—tho I do...
As you will Receive a letter from Gal St Clair Who had been desir’d by Congress to Go with me to the Pensilvania line, I have Nothing to add But that I am here with him, and that I Impatiently wait for Your Arrival which has been Announc’d by Mjor Fishburne on his Going through this place. This Affair is the More Serious as the Men have Appointed a Committee Compos’d of Theyr Ring Leaders...
Here is a letter from Mercereau which says very little, and the little which is said in it I don’t take to be true—But thought I had better send his scroll to head Quarters—I have sent him word that there was no monney for such intelligences as these. Captain Ogden told me that one of our Jersay spies had lately writen to you—I have directed him to go to head quarters and report of some thing...
I have Not Yet Receiv’d Your Answer to Any of My letters. Since My last No News have Come to hand. I hope we shall Soon Some Way or other hear from france. After Many debates Congress have elected Clel Laurens as An Envoy to france—But he still Refuses to Go and thinks Hamilton Ought to be Sent. How this will end I do not know—doctor Franklin has a party Against himI think it would be very...
The bearer of my letter, Chevalier de Lambert, a French gentlemen, will do himself the honor to wait upon you, and I beg leave most earnestly to recommend him to your Excellency’s kind patronage.—You know, my dear General, I have ever been averse to the introduction of foreigners in our army, and since I am in France I have been deaf to every application of that sort. In the present instance,...
from Major Lee I just now hear that he has seen a man who has been in Newyork and told him that an embarkation has certainly taken place, said to be going to Virginia—that he got the intelligence in the City on Monday last, and that dragoons were on Board. A young man that went into the City has lately sent word to his family that he had been press’d on Board a fleet which was going to sail....
I alwais forgot mentionning to you what has past Betwen duke of Lauzun and Myself on account of the diminution that had been made in his horses—From what he told me I saw that it has been put upon this footing that you thought a greater number of horses than was necessary for carrying letters &c. would be quite useless—I explain’d the matter to him, told him you had decided that no less than...
Your letter of the 2d 7ber is just come to Hand. Mine of Yesterday Mentionned that the ships in York River Had gone down. Inclosed is the Account I Receive of an engagement off the Capes. What disposition has been made for the internal protection of the Bay I do not know. Iames River is still guarded but We Have not as Yet Rreceived any letter from Count De Grass relative to His last...
The Bearer of this Mr Lavaud Came to Me with a Recommendation from Viscount de Choiseuïl in the West Indias, and an other from Major General Lincoln who By this time Must Be with the Army—He wishes to Serve as A Volonteer, But I told Him that my family was full, and could not Be increased with french aids de Camp—that my detachement was Small, and Had No Room for Volonteers—He then asked me a...
You very well know that for Many and Many Reasons Both on account of the Country and on that of the french, I think it very important, nay I might say politically necessary that some thing Brilliant Be at this time perform’d By our troops—to those motives Which are very strongly impressed on My Mind, and which I Might More fully explain in A Conversation, I will add, My dear General, that I...
You Have So often Been pleased to Ask I Would Give My opinion upon Any subject that May occur, that I will this day take the Liberty to Mention a few Articles. I am far from Laughing at the idea of the Ennemy’s Making a Retreat—it is not very probable—But it is not impossible. Indeed they Have no other way to escape—and Since We Cannot get ships above York I would be still more Afraid of a...
Having heard of an Express from Rhodeisland being going through the Continental Village I sent for him as it would not delay him More than an hour—inclosed I have the honor to send you the letter from gal heath which I have oppen’d and also two letters from the french Generals to me—it seems, My dear General, that they have Anticipated the desire you express’d yourself of settling our plans in...
Inclosed You will find some Numbers a Copy of Which I Have kept and Which Contain some Names that May probably Occur in our Correspondance. I Need Not telling you, My dear General, that I will Be Happy in Giving You Every Intelligence in My power, and Reminding You of the Most Affectionate friend You Can Ever Have. The Goodness You Had to take upon Yourself the Communicating to the Virginia...
From Doctor B urnet I have Receiv’d intelligence that there has been a very hott press in Newyork, and that Admiral Rodney is going to sail—If we Believe the Report, the Mayor himself was with the press gang and the Cartmen were taken in the streets which shows that they are in hurry to set out—I am taking the Best Measures I Can to hear from the islands, But nothing may be so certain as the...
In revolving into My Mind the chances of discovery By the Moon light, and on the other hand the inconveniences of staying longer than you wish under our tents, I have thought if there was some position which might enable us to take the advantage of the first hours in the Night—how far the sending of the pensilvanians towards Aquakanac, and going ourselves to the Hakinsac position may awaken...
We are Going to Sail, My dear friend, and the last Account I Hear from the shore, the first one I Am to Give in Europe is a New success of General Grene—fort Anne and 300 men taken, the Ennemy litteraly Reduced to Charlestown and Savahna Will Make a pretty Paragraph in the French Gazette—I Will Make it My Business to Work about the Thing You Must Naturally Wish—God Grant I May Have Soon the...
We have Certain Intelligence, My dear General, that Lord North is out of place. He Has Himself Announced that event in Parliament, and Said a New Minister Whould Be Named in the Course of two or three days. It is Generally Believed Marquis de Rockingam will Replace Him—Charles Fox is likely to get into Administration, and there will not be Better principles to be found in the New Ministry than...
By Intelligences just Received I Hear that the British fleet Have Returned to Lyn Haven Bay, and that they were Accompagnied By A Number of Vessels Supposed to Be transports from New-york. From A Conversation with A Gentleman who Having Been taken a few days Before the Engagement was during the Action on Board the Charlestown frigat, I Have Got A particular Account of What Has past in that...
We Arriv’d last Night at this place and was much favor’d By the Weather in our Recconnoitring of the island where, I Confess, my feelings were different from what I had experienc’d when looking at these forts with an hopefull Eye—I saw the fatal Centry Clel Gouvion alluded to on an Upper Battery of Jeffery’s hook—I also saw a Small vessel playing of this hook, But quite a trifling thing...
As there is no knowing When this Letter May Reach You, I Shall Content Myself With the Introduction of mr de Venkersky a Polander Whom I often Have Met in Several Societies—He is a Sensible Man, of Good family, and, I think, Some What deranged in His Money Concerns—This is all I know of Him, But Upon His Earnest Application, Could not deny Him the Happiness to Be presented to General...
From what you have heard from dr hagen about the Boats when on your way to head quarters, I don’t Believe that you may have kept any hope for our succes—the Boats have been it seems Reduc’d to five, and from the time when they were yet at the little falls you May see that they Could not be here at the appointed hour. I will not permit Myself to Reflect on this Moment upon the Many Blunders...
This Letter will be delivered to Your Excellency by Capt. Rochefontaine who is joining the grand Army and will leave this Corps with the few Sapers and Miners we had taken from West Point—I dont apprehend they may be useful to us, and it would have been very inconvenient for them to be seperated from their Corps where they are to receive every kind of supply. with the highest respect—I have...
the disapointement Clel Tupper Met with is So Singular that I wish to Give Your Excellency a full account of this Affair. When the detachement was at the Head of Elk Clel Vose expressed a desire to Return to the Northward founded Upon the particular Circumstances He was Under Which Nothing But fear of Giving Exemple to His Officers and Men prevented Him officialy to Signify— from what He often...
Clel Laurens having Been Appointed By Congress to Go to France and Sollicit succours for the Next Campaign he has also been directed to take your orders at head quarters. I am By order of Congress to have A Conference with him, and intend Giving him Many letters for france. As in your instructions to Laurens the presence of one who Knows these people May be Agreable to You, I Shall set out for...
I am Happy to inform Your Excellency that Count de Grasse’s Fleet is lastly arrived in this Bay—it Consists of 28 ships of the Line with Several frigats, and convoys a Considerable Body of troops Under Marquis de st Simon—Previous to their Arrival Such positions Had Been taken By our Army as to prevent the Ennemy’s Retreating towards Carolina. In Consequence of Your Excellency’s orders I Had...
Great Happiness is derived from friendship, and I do particularly Experience it in the Attachement which Unites Me to You. But friendship Has its duties, and the Man that Likes you the Best will Be the forwardest in Letting you know Every thing where You Can Be Concerned. When the Ennemy Came to your House Many Negroes deserted to them. This piece of News did not affect me much as I little...
However acquainted I may be with our intentions, I thought upon the whole that I should Better wait for your approbation Before I present any opinion of yours to the Spanish or French generals in the West indies. I will, I know, loose the opportunity of the Confederacy, But many vessels are going that way and if my letters meet with your approbation I shall send them By triplicates—I...
There is no fighting Here Unless you Have a Naval Superiority or an Army Mounted upon Race Horses. Phillip’s plan Against Richmond Has Been defeated, He was Going towards Porsmouth, and I thought it Should Be enough for me to oppose Him At Some principal points in this State—But now it Appears I will Have Business to transact With two Armies and this is Rather too much. By letters from North...
Mr Ward’s Corps being situated on the end of Bergen Neck, two and thirty Miles from our Army, Major lee Begun to move yesterday after noon and to execute the plan which he had propos’d; he march’d Conceal’d through the woods so as to Arrive on the Ground By the Breack of the day. he had with him his own Corps, Mjor Parr’s Riflemen, and a piquet of lighter infantry under Captain Abbot. having...