George Washington Papers
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To George Washington from Henry Knox, 17 December 1794

From Henry Knox

December 17th 1794

Sir.

I have the honor to submit to you, letters from Governor Blount just received, dated the 18th 22d and 28th November—I submit the propriety of having these copied together with his former letters and laid before Congress immediately.1 I am, most respectfully, Sir, Your obedt Servt

H. Knox

LS, DLC:GW; LB, DLC:GW.

1Bartholomew Dandridge, Jr., wrote Knox on this date: “By the President’s order Bw Dandridge has the honor to return to The Secy of War the Letters &c. from Govr Blount; & to inform the Secretary that the President wishes copies of them to be prepared to lay before Congress” (ADf, DLC: GW). Knox submitted the copies to Congress with a letter of 19 Dec. that was received by the House of Representatives on that date and by the Senate on 22 Dec. (ASP description begins Walter Lowrie et al., eds. American State Papers. Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States. 38 vols. Washington, D.C., Gales and Seaton, 1832–61. description ends , Indian Affairs, 1:529).

The original letters have not been identified, but for the copies submitted to Congress, see ASP description begins Walter Lowrie et al., eds. American State Papers. Documents, Legislative and Executive, of the Congress of the United States. 38 vols. Washington, D.C., Gales and Seaton, 1832–61. description ends , Indian Affairs, 1:541–42. William Blount’s letter to Knox of 18 Nov. proposed as “essential to the preservation of the peace with the Cherokees” that when a murder was committed by a Cherokee, “satisfaction shall instantly be demanded of the town, or towns, in which the murderer, or murderers, live, and, if not given, taken.” Blount’s letter of 22 Nov. enclosed a copy of his letter of that date to James Robertson describing his orders to the militia for the protection of the Mero District. Blount’s letter of 28 Nov. reported “that the Creeks continue to murder the citizens of the United States, resident in this territory,” and repeated his suggestion that the Chickasaws, Choctaws, and Cherokees would “aid the arms of the United States, in chastising and humbling this blood thirsty nation” if he could have instructions to use them.

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