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    • Knox, Henry
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    • Confederation Period
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    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Author="Knox, Henry" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 21-30 of 74 sorted by recipient
I have the honor to enclose the weekly return of the troops. On the 7th instant the remainder of the 3d Massachusetrs regiment arrived from the southward in a pretty healthy state, having left but few upon the road. The troops having been uncommonly sickly for this place, and a malignant putrid fever being among their disorders, I have fixed upon the barrack at Constitution Island as an...
The Jersey election being decided, the four members from that State will be here tomorrow or next day —Two members from Pensylvania who have hitherto attended the Assembly of that state which has now adjourned will also be here tomorrow evening—With the above and Mr Smith who has arrived here from Maryland the house of representatives will be formed on Wednesday or Thursday next. The senate...
It is a circumstance of great chagrin to the members of the new government who are assembled here, that they have received no additionals since my last. They remain at 8 senators and 18 Representatives. Letters are forwarded to the absent members of Maryland Delaware and Virginia; but if the two houses are not formed untill effected in consequence of those letters, a month at least will...
A fear of intruding upon your more important concerns has prevented my writing to you since my return. I found here your kind favor of the 2d of June, with its enclosure for General Putnam which I delivered. The measures taken by Congress respecting the western posts must defeat themselves by their own imbecillity. I cannot say but that I am well satisfied to be excluded from any...
It is with the most sincere satisfaction that I congratulate you on the unconditiona⟨l⟩ adoption of the constitution by the Convention of this state. The particulars of this important event are contained in this days paper herein enclosed. Messrs Jay Hamilton and the rest of the federalists have derived great honor from their temperate and wise conduct during the tedious debates on this...
I wrote you on the 22d ultimo, that the affairs of Massachusetts were quietly settling down to peace and good order. But by recent advice from General Lincoln, it appears that the Insurgents who fled from Massachusetts, have received encouragement from the Inhabitants of this State bordering on the Line—and that embracing the time when the greatest part of his force were disbanded on the 23...
Agreably to my promise my dear sir, I write you from this place, and flatter myself with the hope, that although my letter contains no important intelligence, yet it may not be unpleasing to you. Your calm retreat, of mount Vernon, must be a source of ineffable delight to you. you can from thence, take a retrospective view, of the critical exigencies of the War, and see a thousand ways, by...
I thank you my dear Sir for your favor of the 10th of last month which I duly received. The constitution has labored in Massachusetts exceedingly more than was expected. The opposition has not arisen from a consideration of the merits or demerits of the thing itself as a political machine, but from a deadly principle levelled at the existence of all government whatever; The principles of...
By some bad arrangement of the post, which has been detained two days upon the road, I did not receive your excellencys dispatches of the 23, and 25 ultimo untill last night. I will attend to your directions to discharge the invalids and those whose times of service will shortly expire. If 3000 men or any number near it, should be absolutely necessary for a considerable part, or the whole of...
I thank you my dear Sir for your Kind favor of the 26th ultimo, which I received on the 7th instant. On the dispersion of the insurgents at Worcester, which was dictated more by the inclemency of the weather, and the consideration of having effected their object, than by any apprehensions of coercion from Government, many people were of opinion that the disorders were at an end, and that...