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ALS : American Philosophical Society I have hitherto deferred troubling you with a letter in hopes that I might hear something in this critical time worth your notice. Having from my situation been disappointed in my wishes, I write now to avoid subjecting myself to the Idea of neglect or disrespect. Your kindness and attention, which I shall ever gratefully remember, call for a different...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Since I had the pleasure of writing to you on the 21 Ult. nothing has come within my knowledge worth your notice. The kindness you have already shewn me encourages me to apply to you now matters begin to assume a dangerous aspect. A heedless speech imprudently supported by an Irish young man here, has not only occasioned his own banishment, but also an...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Fearing the miscarriage of a letter I wrote by post to your Grandson upon a Subject of the utmost importance to me, I have seized an occasion kindly procured me by Mr. Carmichael of sending you the present; & this I have done with the greater readiness as it has given me an opportunity of repeating those grateful Sentiments which naturally arise from a...
ALS : American Philosophical Society By Mr Jay’s & Mr Carmichaels interest I have at last got over the difficulties which the formers delicacy had thrown in my way & obtained permission to come to this place as a friend to America, an Indulgence I mean to profit of during a short period, intending to give the strongest proof I am able of my right to this title by embarking here in the very...
The only letter I have had the Pleasure of recieving from you is dated the 3 d . of Novemb. last— I regret the miscarriage of the others, as well because they were from you, as because they doubtless contained Information which either on domestic or public accounts, and perhaps on both, was interesting. Your elder Brother has spent much Time here— I need not add, usefully, he is at present in...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I received a Pacquet you were so good as to bring for me from Philadelphia; but it contains no Letters later than the 13th. of January. As the Ministry here received Letters at the same time, & I believe brought also by you, that are as late as the 4th of April, I cannot but be surpriz’d that we have no fresh Letters by the same Ship that you came in.— Can...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I am Somewhat Surprised to find your letters are of So early a date; I have recd a letter from Mr Jay to Same purport;—all I can say upon the Subject is that the Genl. letters given me, were those intended to go by Mr Jefferson two months before; Mr Morris gave me Some letters the morning I came away, directed If I recollect right, to Mess. Grand, Le...
I thank You for your obliging Letter of the 24 th . Ult:, inclosing a Paragraph respecting me in M r Oswalds Paper of the same Date— You have my authority to deny the Change of Sentiments it imputes to me, & to declare that in my opinion, it is adviseable for the People of America to adopt the Constitution proposed by the late Convention—If you should think it expedient to publish this Letter,...
Letter not found: from John Vaughan, 17 April 1788. On 27 April GW wrote Vaughan : “I have received your two letters of the 17th and 21st Inst.”
Letter not found: from John Vaughan, 21 April 1788. On 27 April Vaughan wrote GW: “I have received your two letters of the 17th and 21st Inst.”
I have received your two letters of the 17th and 21st Inst. and the papers containing the four numbers of Fabius whih accompany’d them. I must beg you to accept of my best thanks for your polite attention in forwarding those papers to me. The writer of the pieces signed Fabius, whoever he is appears to be master of his subject; he treats it with dignity, and at the same time expresses himself...
I have perused with Singular pleasure some thoughts on the Constitution addressed to the State of NYk & was expressing my Sentiments to our good friend D r Franklin—who observed that if you was the Author (as Said) he thought it incumbent upon you to put your name to it—to give it additional Weight at this awful Crisis I call it awful because a rejection in your State would be productive of...
I have considered the Hint suggested in your Letter of the     my long, and I may say habitual respect for the Sentiments of D r . Franklin, at first inclined me to adopt them relative to the Subject in Question. Further Consideration induced me to suspect that he has estimated the Influence of my opinions beyond their Value— If the Reasoning in the Pamphlet you allude to is just, it will have...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Vaughan and incloses him a copy of a letter he has just sent to Dr. Smith. There was so little within his particular knowlege, worthy of being noted in memory of Dr. Franklin, that he communicates it only in proof of his respect for the desire of the committee who did him the honor of calling on him, and of whom Mr. Vaughan was one. RC ( PPAP );...
Having been honored with the Vice Presidents consent to attend the Eulogium in Memory of D r Benjamin Franklin. We in the name of the Philosophical Society, presume to hope you will do them the honor of your presence on the Same important occasion We have the honor to be / with the greatest respect / Madam / Your obedient Servants RC ( Adams Papers ); internal address: “M rs Adams.—” Benjamin...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Vaughan. He has sent one of Argand’s double lamps to Mr. Bringhurst to have wickracks fixed to it, and has directed him to deliver it to Mr. Vaughan, when done, for the use of the Philosophical society whose acceptance of it he asks. He presumes that if suspended over the middle of the table it will sufficiently light it. RC ( PPAP ); addressed:...
I thank you for having given me the perusal of the letter herewith returned. Lamentable! to see such a spirit of revolt among the Blacks. Where it will stop, is difficult to say. Yours sincerely ALS , PPAmP : Madeira-Vaughan Collection. Philadelphia merchant John Vaughan (1756–1841) was a son of Samuel Vaughan, who owned estates in the Caribbean islands. John Vaughan’s later purchase of one of...
A French gentleman (Monsr. De Rieux) a neighbor of mine whom I much esteem, having had a legacy left him by a relation in France, his friends, on account of the depreciation of their paper medium, thought it better to invest the money in goods, and to remit it in that way. They consisted in glass of various kinds, ribbons &c and were to leave Havre in May last addressed to Monsr. Hombert of...
Mr Vaughan has the honor of transmitting to his Excellency President Washington a letter he received under Cover from England—The accounts from france are later than what are probably contained in the letter, & Not So Satisfactory as those Mr Vaughan recd by the same opportunity. L , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. The enclosure has not been identified, but Philadelphia wine merchant John...
M. Vaughan informs Mr. Jefferson that he has purchased Bills for about 15,000 Dollars and expects in an hour to complete the 20,000. He wishes to know to what order they are to be drawn, and as the parties only draw to answer pressing demands, M. V. will request that he may know as early as Convenient this morning, where to send for the money. 3000 13,000 Willing Morris & Swanwick 400  1...
I take the liberty of enclosing a letter I have just recieved from Carolina—from a house of Character there, the perusal of which may not be improper at the present moment; I would not even wait to make the extract, which if your Excellency should wish can be done at any moment. I remain with the greatest respect—Your obt Servt A Vessel goes to Charleston on Tueday next. ALS , DNA : RG 59,...
“America and all that belongs to it is Still viewed with Jealousy in England and be assured that if this war of Kings succeeds, Spain and England will jointly quarrel with America, So as to shake your funds to their roots—Be assured the War will daily open cases of Jeopardy and dispute to compromise your peace. The publick is a little Cooled in its rage for War and adverse events would quickly...
[ Philadelphia, July 6, 1793. On July 8, 1793, Hamilton wrote to Vaughan and referred to Vaughan’s “letter of the 6th. Instant.” Letter not found. ] Vaughan was a Philadelphia wine merchant and importer.
In reply to your letter of the 6th. Instant, I am to inform you, that the two draughts dated the 5th. July 1793 and drawn upon me at 30 days sight in your favor by Mr. Genet Minister Plenipotentiary of the Republic of France; the One for Four Hundred and Thirty one Dollars and Sixty Eight Cents and the Other for Two Thousand, five Hundred and thirty Nine Dollars and forty four Cents, will be...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Mr. Vaughan, and finding that the Pragers do not draw at present, he must endeavor to procure any other good bills on London or Amsterdam to a smaller amount for the present moment. If Mr. Vaughan can recommend him any (say to amount of 5000.D.) the drawers having property here to secure us, and not dealing in paper, he will oblige Th:J. Can Mr....
M. Vaughan takes the liberty of enclosing to Mr. Jefferson a Copy of a Contract for Land, made by a worthy French Family. M. Vaughan wishes Mr. Jefferson would favor him with any information in his power on the subject of these Lands—Which The family would I believe wish to dispose of. If you can communicate your opinions to Mr. Priestly, I shall be Still more obliged. Yours sincerely RC ( MHi...
I received some time ago from you the inclosed paper, but not being certain of the precise point of the enquiry intended, I meant to have had the pleasure of seeing you. In the mean time the malady of the town prevents it, and occasions my setting off for Virginia tomorrow. I presume it might be to know something of the value of the lands: but on this subject a more ignorant person could not...
Having mentioned to Mr Hamilton the Substance of a sentiment conveyed to me by D[r] Bancroft, He thought the communication would be agreeable to you I enclose the original & have made an extract. I remain with the greatest esteem your st ALS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters. Physician Edward Bancroft (1744–1821) was born in Westfield, Massachusetts. He settled in England in 1767 and in...
I hope you will not think it presumptive of me to add a word to the Subject of the enclosed letters— The Talents of M Cooper are highly Spoken of (in the law) which he practises in Northumberland—I have had an intimate acquaintance with him since his residence in this Country, & whatever His Speculative opinions may have been, he has never rendered himself a party; & even those speculative...
Not knowing how far the inclosed address may serve to give a certain conveyance to the letter, I have thought it safest to put it under your cover, not doubting that your communion with the person would enable you to procure it a sure passage to it’s destination. I am with esteem Dear Sir Your friend & servt PrC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “Mr. John Vaughan.” Enclosure: TJ to Benjamin Vaughan,...