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Documents filtered by: Period="Revolutionary War" AND Correspondent="Vaughan, Benjamin" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
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ALS : Yale University Library This Line will be presented to you by a very ingenious Gentleman, M. Kempel, inventor of the Automaton that plays at Chess. He has other Inventions in Mechanics of a more useful Nature, which he has Thoughts of communicating in England, if he can meet with Encouragement. I beg leave to recommend him to your Civilities & Counsels, and am ever, with sincere Esteem &...
Incomplete AL : American Philosophical Society Having heard that you have been told at Paris, that Lord Shelburne had used foul play about the instructions for removing the troops from New York, I have only to state as a fact, that Genl. Gray in a letter I have in my possession addressed to Lord Keppel, requests to know on what means he may depend for removing the troops from New York, which...
ALS : Library of Congress I beg to introduce to your kind regards one of my best respected friends, Mr Dugald Stewart, who though as yet little known out of Scotland, is one of the best known men in it. He stands in the very first class of their mathematicians & literary men. He has twice at a day’s warning taken up Dr. Adam Ferguson’s lectures in Moral Philosophy, & twice completely excelled...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Having an opportunity of writing you by the Dutch envoy from London, I cannot omit sending you a line to tell you that I see nothing more that is amiss here than you know of, notwithstanding Mr Knox & two or three people pretend that the Loyal Colonies are to have the trade to the islands. If you keep firm, & good humored, I hope you will in the end lose...
(I) and (II) ALS : American Philosophical Society I beg permission to introduce to your warm civilities, Lord Daer, son of the Earl of Selkirk. He was introduced to me lately as a very valuable & philosophical acquaintance, & my short intercourse with him has confirmed every report I had heard of him. His political principles are well known, & very friendly to us. He means to stay some time at...
Transcript: Massachusetts Historical Society I have received your several late favors by Mr Jonathan Williams & Mr. Penn, with many thanks.— I cut out such parts of your newspapers as I judged proper to have published here, & was about to send them to some printer, but young Mr H. Laurens coming at the moment, I put them into his hands, as his father was well enough acquainted with the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I wrote to you a few Days since by Mr Williams, but I omitted some Newspapers which I had intended to send by him: I now inclose them. They contain sundry Articles relating to the Barbarities exercis’d by the British in America; and as you had borrow’d of me a Paper containing an Account of those committed by Lord Cornwallis, and thought there might be some...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 227–8. You mention that I may now see verified all you said about binding down England to so hard a peace. I suppose you do not mean by the American treaty; for we were exceeding favourable in not insisting on the reparations so justly due for the wanton...
ALS : American Philosophical Society A very respectable planter of Antigua writes to desire of Mr Manning, “as a particular favor, that he would procure for his son a letter to Dr Franklin, as he is desirous he should know one of the first characters this age has produced.” The young gentleman, Mr Mackinnen, who presents you with this letter is the person alluded to, and though he is...
ALS : American Philosophical Society There seems still an indecision in public affairs, as far as relates to ministry, but every body is glad to stand upon the clear ground of a peace; so that you need not fear that your treaty will be shaken. I find every plan I had heard spoken of, was in a great state of ripeness, when I arrived in London; and the grandest ideas prevailing about free trade,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The return of Mr White enables me to send you some of the articles you asked of me to procure. You will find the list inclosed, and in my next I will try to send you a bill of my disbursements, both now & formerly.— Mr Franklin’s glasses will be forwarded by Mr Storer, or earlier, if an opportunity offers. They would have gone now by Mr White, had I...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), I , 59–63. When I had read over your sheets of minutes of the principal incidents of your life, recovered for you by your Quaker acquaintance; I told you I would send you a letter expressing my reasons why I thought it would be useful to complete and publish it...
AL : American Philosophical Society Messrs: Vaughan have the honor to present their respects to Dr: Franklin. A prior engagement obliges them with the most extreme regret to decline the pleasure of waiting upon him on sunday, agreeable to his kind invitation. Mr: Vaughan has the honor to inclose a list of some books sold by the same bookseller who furnished Mr V with the copy of the Politique...
ALS : William L. Clements Library I should have been at Versailles this Morning as you desired, tho’ I had no clear Conception, from what you said to me, how my going could be of Use; but late last Night I received a Note from M. de V. [Vergennes] which postpones the Interview till tomorrow at 10 aClock. Your Brother tells me that you would have come out here to day if you had not imagined I...
AL : Library of Congress B V: presents his most affectionate respects to Dr. Franklin, and is unfortunately so engaged to day, as not to be able to accept of his kind welcome. B V’s brother acted for the best, but not being privy to circumstances, misunderstood him.— Tomorrow evening B V will however call at Passy, unless inconvenient to his friend, and directed otherwise. Addressed: A Monsr /...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 423–4. I cannot but in the most earnest manner and from recent circumstances, press your going early to Versailles to-morrow; and I have considerable reason to think, that your appearance there will not displease the person whom you address. I am of opinion...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I inclose you an extract of a letter from Dr. Priestley to my brother William, on the subject of his late supposed discovery. At the same time I inform you that I have procured a small glass jar, for the purpose of observing the cause of the phœnomenon of the small bits of tea-leaves, which you find whirled to the centre of the bottom of your breakfast cup,...
Reprinted from William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 412–13. I am so agitated with the present crisis, that I cannot help writing you, to beseech you again and again to meditate upon some mild expedient about the refugees, or to give a favourable ear, and helping hand to such as may turn up. Both sides agree...
ALS : Library of Congress I find that I can go off with convenience very early on Thursday morning; and therefore if agreeable, should wish you to give me your letter for Mr: T: T: tomorrow evening , as it may furnish with me with a probable occasion of speaking to that gentleman about certain affairs. Mr: H:’s letter may come under cover to me by a courier.— The very moment a certain event...
ALS : Historical Society of Pennsylvania Lest by some accident I should miss the opportunity of travelling with the courier, I sit down just to tell you that I am prepared to depart the instant I hear the commission is sealed, which by the Chancellor having been at Buxton has been for some days delayed. I have got together the different articles committed to my care to procure, and shall not...
ALS : American Philosophical Society The inclosed I believe is what you wished; and it is of the party’s hand writing. His account of himself may be natural, and it may be otherwise. But you of course will be the best judge. On Tuesday morning about 10 o’clock I shall bring the lady we spoke of to visit you, according to your kind permission.—The more I see of her, the more her appearance of...
Copy: Massachusetts Historical Society To avoid pressing you with conversation, & to shew how little I expect you to enter into any answer or dispute, I leave with you upon paper, my thoughts concerning your American confiscations; that you may take as much or as little of them as you please. I know of two principles, which your American friends will say influenced them in this matter;...
ALS : partially reproduced in Christie’s auction catalogue, “Important Autograph Letters from the Historical Archives at Bowood House” (London, Oct. 12, 1994), p. 34; William Temple Franklin, ed., Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin … (3 vols., 4to, London, 1817–18), II , 388–9. In mine of yesterday, which went by Mr Young, I made no mention of yours of May 11. it not being...
Press copy of ALS : Kaller’s Historical Documents, Inc., New Jersey (2002) I have before me your several Favours of June 7, June 17, & July 9. The Box sent to Mr. Bowens at Ostend is also come to hand. It contain’d a Dozen 4to Vols. of my Writings, and a Number of Pamphlets which you have been so good as to chuse for me; but the Remembrancers, & Registers bought for me by Mr Young, and left by...
ALS : University of Pennsylvania Library I beg to introduce to your acquaintance My friend Mr Benjn. Savage, a young Gentn., born in South Carolina. By some accident or other, his friends have chosen the wrong side of the question, though he has relations very warmly contending on the right side. Politics however do not much warp his mind, which is as candid a one almost as I ever knew; and...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I beg to introduce to your acquaintance my friend Dr. Lister, whom I first became acquainted with at Edinburgh, and who was there a good deal respected for his good character and assiduity, and who I find bears an equal character among his connections here in London. I know him to be a person of very amiable & honorable character in his private conduct,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Mr Bowen has by this time received your books, directed to Ostend.— May you go on with the work of peace for which you are so gloriously prepared by the spirit of sweet humanity & an enlarged mind. I think I may venture to say from a knowledge of characters that no liberality YOU introduce herein, will meet with a repulse; on the contrary, that it will meet...
ALS : American Philosophical Society My father having an immediate desire to purchase lands in America to the amount of £4000 by way of a beginning; and your friend Mr. E. Jeffries of the club of “honest Whigs at the London Coffee House,” being determined to appropiate £2000 in that line; and I believe another friend having determined upon a like adventure, of which he is soon to advertise us;...
AL : American Philosophical Society I have seen Mr. L—— [Laurens] since his return from Bath. He had received my Letter, but was so much incapacitated by his disorder having lain in his head, as to have written only one letter; and that, though a common one, & in reply to his physician, cost him three hours and an half.— He says that Indigo certainly was sent from America, by the young...
ALS : American Philosophical Society You must forgive an old letter, which you will receive by this conveyance: but it contains things which I have not mentioned to you before, and shews my intentions; and therefore I send it in its present state. I have three papers included along with it; one upon Fairy Rings, one upon the Inflammation of candles, and another upon the Riots at the time of...
ALS : American Philosophical Society A person has been named to me for some time past, as about to depart for Paris, by whom I designed writing in preference to the post; but as he delays, and you will think me dilatory in the mean time, I write under cover to M. le Grand. I communicated with Mr. Burke on the subject of your letter. He said that he had received it, but knowing that ministry...
AL (draft) and copy: Library of Congress I received your late Favour without date, and immediately ordered 100 £ Sterling in the Hands of Mr Hodgson to be at the Disposition of Mr President Laurens. Please to inform me how he does. My last Informations which came from the Lieut of the Tower thro’ Sir Grey Cooper, were that he was very well, & that he was perfectly satisfied with the Treatment...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have a letter with some philosophical papers which will reach you as soon as I find an opportunity, & by which you will be informed of the reasons of my long silence. In the mean time I proceed to give you some necessary intelligence. You perhaps have heard that I have made a connection in the family of Mr Manning, a West India merchant; & that Col...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I now fulfil a part of the promise I lately made you, of a communication upon the subject of natural history & philosophy. Arthur’s seat you know to be a considerable hill in the neighborhood of Edinburgh. While I was in that city, my excellent friend Professor Dugald Stewart informed me, that Dr. Hutton (one of the philosophical society of that place) had...
AL : American Philosophical Society Do you know of a reason to impose silence upon the most fervid affection & deepest respect? I know of one; and a very powerful one; It is shame. You are a good judge of human nature, and know of it too.— And for what is my shame? why for having checked your reputation, when I had the mortification of meaning to serve it. I was first, too honest in saying to...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Dr. Priestley & Lord Shelburne have parted, as far as I can understand, amicably. The truth is, the two characters were such as did not understand the one the other: The one did not comprehend enough the nature & merit of a speculative scholar, nor the other the situation and difficulties of a political actor. I labored, as you did, to prevent it; but...
Copy: Library of Congress I received duly the large Parcel of Letters and Papers you favoured me with by Mr. Austin, to which I shall when I can get a little time, answer particularly. I received also a Box, containing 12 of the 4tos. and 4 of the 8vos. in boards, with the spanish Dictionary and Grammar, and I think some Pamphlets. A bound 4to. is also come to hand, I know not whether from you...
AL : Library of Congress Dr. Hamilton had a letter for you some weeks ago; but I find him still in Holland. The bearer of this is of his party, & as Dr. Crawford gives him a character, I inclose the Drs. letter in case you should meet with him. By the present opportunity you have two packets from Dr. Jebb. The MS. he had prepared for another conveyance which he missed; and as I thought you...
AL : Library of Congress I write this simply to inform you that I sent you no less than three pacquets and a letter by Mr. Austin, to forward from Amsterdam. I hope they will safely arrive.— Your book is translating in two places in Germany; & Dr. Forster’s son would have translated it himself, had not the advertisements from other quarters prevented him. This letter may perhaps be delivered...
Copy: Library of Congress I received your favour of Nov. 2. in which I see you have started a good deal of philosophical Game; let me know from time to time your success and send me some of the Venison. Mr. fabrony call’d to see me, but express’d no desire of altering his Voyage, and proceeded immediately to Italy. I received also yours of Jan. 4. with the Sheets of the appendix but I have not...
AL (incomplete): Library of Congress This letter is one of the many fragmentary or undated Vaughan manuscripts which have challenged our editorial skill. Although we include it here, as belonging to the general period before Political, Miscellaneous, and Philosophical Pieces was published, it was most likely written just after Christmastime, 1776, when Vaughan arrived in Paris bearing an early...
ALS (draft) and two copies: Library of Congress I have received several kind Letters from you which I have not regularly answered. They gave me however great Pleasure, as they acquainted me with your Welfare, and that of your Family & other Friends: and I hope you will continue writing to me as often as you can do it conveniently. I thank you much for the great Care & Pains you have taken in...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Mr Thos. Oliver of Lowlayton, Mr Richd. Oliver’s Cousin & the partner of Mr Lovel, thinks it adviseable to send the inclosed; & as he seemed anxious about it, I did not prevent his satisfying his own mind & being also satisfied about my good wishes to the Alderman. Being told that the Grenada people who went on Sunday, would take no letters I deferred...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Mr Oliver has written me a letter from Barbadoes, desiring me to procure from my connections letters to the French Governors of Grenada & St. Vincents; in both which islands he has property, more particularly in the former. As I take for granted this hint was intended for you , and will be such as your opinion of him will induce to comply with; I take the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I beg the favor very particularly of you to give a letter of recommendation for Langford Lovell Esqr. (who gives the inclosed account of himself) addressed to the Govr. of Dominica. I should esteem it an addition to the favor, if you would yourself inclose a duplicate of such letter to Mr Lovel in Dominica, by some safe conveyance; as in such case, by means...
AL : American Philosophical Society There was some little tumult when I sent you the last printed pacquet, (which however missed two opportunities of going) and therefore you had no letter.— By the present opportunity I wish to inquire your opinion as to the time of appearance. I am for the present moment; the bookseller for deferring: But as my opinion will rule, I wish without giving...
AL : American Philosophical Society I have not been able to bring our business to a conclusion within a sheet , and I choose to send the whole together: It cannot now be more than a week. The Bp. of St. A. has given another motto for a head that is engraved;— “ Non sordidus auctor naturœ verique .” I hope I am not usually presumptuous or sanguine; but I guess you will not be displeased with...
AL : American Philosophical Society I have this instant heard of this opportunity. I can put up nothing; scarcely this letter. Every thing appears to me huddled and uncertain; we were a little up, but the apparent imbecillity of those to act against us, has let the spirit cool again very much. And danger made a cry for unanimity that did us mischief. Your paper about the aurora has been a good...
AL : American Philosophical Society In about 3 weeks time I hope to send you every thing complete, relative to a certain collection. There will be an engraving of the head of the party, taken from the larger medallion, of which you sent a miniature-size to Miss G: S.— The motto, given by her father at my request, is “His country’s friend, but more of humankind.” I wanted something that should...
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have no pretensions to trouble the person affording me this conveyance with a large pacquet, otherwise I might send you more sheets. We are indeed just finished; only that I have expectations of procuring your preface to Mr Galway’s speech, and in consequence the epitaph; all which can very easily be inserted. Indeed it was through great carelessness that...