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    • Adams, John
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    • Van der Kemp, François Adriaan

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I regret, that So often I must wearÿ you with mÿ complaints about myself, and yet I must do it, in apologÿ to myself, when I write a dull Letter. I have again be tortured with head-ache, and enjoÿ now only a little relief, which I am apprehensive Shall not last long—but I must take hold of this interval, to give me the pleasure, of answering your last favour of the 2d inst. I believe, I Shall...
Although I did not hear from Montezillo—Since your very affectionate Letter of 30 May—except by our friend Tyng, on 27 July—I am confident, that I can not be forgotten—and Supposed, that health and contentment must have remained your familys Share, increased yet by the presence of the Secretary of State, and the distinguished progress of your grandson—yet these pleasing contemplations were...
Confident, that, after Such a long Silence, a few Letters of an old friend, who allways revered you, and will continue to do So till his last breath, Shall not be unacceptable, I once more take up my pen I can not—after approaching my 73th foster the hope, that I Shall be permitted to do it often—But I will not delay it longer—as I hear neither from you or my N. England frends a word—except...
Although my health is very indifferent, and my eyes soo weak and dim, that within a fortnight, I could Scarce affect any thing, either by labour or in writing—yet I must indulge the gratification of thanking you, for the few affectionate lines with which your kindness favoured me with. My Physician Says—all will be Soon well—the chief remedies are—abstinentia et quiete.Was your life less...
He published—his opinions on Jus Eccles. Protest . in the Ses—which were—under his presidium—defended publicly by his most eminent Students. This could not be performed without awakening the intolerant zeal of the clergy—Their rage—increased when manÿ of their Brethren Strengthened him with their open Support—then the Church became in danger. Spies—under pious pretexts were Send to him for...
I dare not, no, I will not delay longer my answer to your affectionate Letter, with which I was honoured again—neither my Severe headache, nor bad eyes would not have occasioned it, but, I flattered myself from day to day, to receive tidings from your Dear and estimable Caroline—or her Pastor—but I do not feel any anxiety about that family—as I am persuaded that the Rev. Westbrook would have...
Tu m’aduli, ma tu mi piace says anÿ where Chesterfield—but so you do in a most egregious manner—but you make your Physic so highly palatable, that it is swallowed, before reason can with sufficient coolness examine, if the encomium—so kindly bestowed is really deserved. You want not to be informed—that I am highlÿ pleased, when I am favoured with your encouraging approbation—and whÿ should I...
I have now before me your favour of July the 15th, with which, as usual, I was highlÿ gratified. I could have wished, to have delay’d its answer longer, till the assaults of that relentless Demon of head-ache had been abated, who possesses me again Since three weeks, but I know not, to what charm he will listen—So that I must Submit with resignation, till he is tired of the contest. Indeed...
Once more I must give you my cordial thanks for this proof of your remembrance—not, that I suspected it—but I did not expect so soon an answer. Every one, which I receive every letter of myself—I consider—nearly unwillingly—that it may be the last of our correspondence—continued now since more than forty years—during which—whatever Station you fulfilled—I was allways honoured with your kind...
Yesterday I was highly gratified with your affectionate Letter, and answer it directly, not to renew my thanks, as I can no more express these as lively, as I See it impossible to reciprocate these—and then you dare to ask me, if my residence at Montezillo had been tolerable—did not then my friend read my contentment—in every gesture, in every feature of my visage—then certainly my countenance...
If anÿ man rejoice in the prosperity of the united States i wil hope that me shal not be denied a place amongst them, and I think it mÿ dutÿ to congratulate your Excellencÿ with the complete victorÿ of your arms in the chesapeak-baÿ and the Burgoynishing of that mighty Lord with his many thousand Slaves. Now wil the proud of the British nation be humiliated—now shal a venal and corrupt...
As you will not wait in bestowing your kindnesses, till I arrive at Montezillo, you must permit me to give you my cordial thanks for this renewed proof of frendship—If well, then I leave my family—half of August—and hope to See you befor, the end of that month. I Shall be at mrs Eliot’s about the 21—if I come Safe as far at Cambridge.— Saturday we were unexpectedly visited by mr Dwight Miss C....
Permit me to address You with few words upon your election to the Presidencÿ of the United States: Mÿ wishes in this part are entirely accomplished—May America remain happÿ in peace, and prosper under your administration—So that the names of Washington and Adams may be combined at every new election—as those of August and Trajan; maÿ its Thankfulness compensate in part the Sacrifices, which...
The Sensible pleasure, received from your Excell:s favour of the 25th Dec. with which I was honoured quite unexpected, induces me to a rescription. I hope, this will not be consider’d as abusing your Excell. condescendence, in devoting few moments of your precious time to an old client, who may boast of your Excell. esteem, continued in different Situations of life Since twenty years. Maÿ I...
As your Letter of the 29 of Jan—afforded me a Sensible pleasure, I will procure meself another in writing you again. God be praised, that your health is unimpaired—it must continue so manÿ daÿs, if the warm wishes of your Relatives and friends obtain their accomplishments—our own interests—mÿ Dear Sir! prompts this wish. I spent this winter verÿ agreablÿ—partlÿ with mÿ old Classick friends...
I will not delay to Send you a few lines—in answer to your favour of June 24th—with which I was gratified—at my return from a Short excursion to the Oneyda Lake—when I went to bid a last farewell to a friend, decaying in mind and body—He can not be long here, neither is it desirable either for him or his Children—It is mr J. Bernhard—who followed my Steps from Europe; and whose worthy Son...
I intended at first to have answered your kind favour of July 16—last week—but I was everÿ daÿ So much fatigued in the evening—having—after my gardens were cleared thoroughly, been engaged in, Sawing and Splitting oven-wood, that I rather found it requisite—to take Some amusement, in re–perusing your letter—or taking a book, while an unexpected visit of mr Varick from utica, and mr Childs of...
It is with an inexpressible delight, that I received and perused your affectionate Letter of the first of this month after a long Silence. I cannot expect, that I Should more often receive similar favours—I Shall continue thankful, if I am permitted to See these now and then. I mentioned the name of your grand Son George, the Son of the Judge, not knowing that he was already engaged in...
Although much indisposed duty compells me to Send you a few lines—and as I feel allways Somewhat reliev’d, when I write to you, it may now have the same beneficial Success—and So I Shall reap the reward of my Labour, even before hand. Now I am nearly certain to know—why in Such a vast course of time I did not receive a Single letter from Quinceÿ. The New-york Spectator of last Saturdaÿ—informs...
Often when I labour in my garden,—and I do so usually from sunrise till its setting—I expatiate with you and your son in your delightful mansion. Soon everything around you shall brighten, you shall revive a while, when the president your son visits you. Indeed your last days appear to me your best days. Printed Source--Francis Adrian Van der Kemp, An Autobiography, Together with Extracts from...
Although I am not perfectlÿ free from head-ache a fixed oppression in the forehead which leaves a disagreable Stupor, and without whose removal I shall be unable to return to my charge with usual alacrity, I got in so far the better of it, that I take up mÿ pen and I hope, ere long it shall again be in mÿ power to expel everÿ gloomÿ thought by plunging head long in Philosophical enquiries:...
How Shall it be in my power, to paÿ you mÿ Sincere thanks for the favours with which you continue to honour me—even above mÿ warmest expectation. I was not vain enough to attend at So much condescendence from your part, to offer mÿ Inset —with your own hand—to your illustrious Academÿ—by which I received the most unequivocal pledge of your high approbation—a more than equivalent reward for my...
I am again favoured with your kind letter of Jan. 23. It bears with it the usual Stamp of Serenity and health of bodÿ and mind. Maÿ both be continued as long you become not entirely dissatisfied with your abode here—and maÿ everÿ occurrence, which might distress either be long time averted! I presume—neither I think, that I presume too much, that if you visited once Smith’s valleÿ—you would...
Is it not Strange, that this year—I Should not have received one Single line from those—whom I So highly respect, at Boston? No—not even of Montezillo? It cannot be—that you are indisposed—or any of the family—your promising George would have mentioned it to me—The last notice I obtained of the family was from Fish-kill—and will the 4th of march your’s was of 18 Febr—Could it be possible, that...
Although I hear no more of Montezillo than of Boston—Yet I trust, that it is not unacceptable to receive again a—few lines—and the N. papers tell us—from time to time—that He—whom we love and respect—continues to enjoy health and happiness—and yet Sometimes—from a foul mouth ed an adders tongue endeavours to poison those who are less acquainted with them whom we respect and admire—and it may...
It is certainlÿ a long while, that you received not a line from me, and this nothwithstanding I was So highly gratifiede, and as it were buoy’d by your kind favour of 30 Nov. last—But—how could I do else, as I wrote not even to mÿ Son—labouring Since the three last months under an increasing debility, which Seemed to threaten the total destruction of the machine. As long however it was only a...
As I esteem a peculiar favour that you continue to honour me with your correspondence, for which I chieflÿ am indebted to your friend Ship and condescending kindness; Is deemed a duty to renew from time to time mÿ assurances of high respect, tho’ fullÿ Satisifed, that my gratefulness for received favours never was doubted. Your generosity—if I might Seem to interrupt you too often—will make...
I can not express you—how warmlÿ I am obliged to you for your your last kind favour of May 20th. It Saÿs—nothing that it pleased and instructed—no—it did much more—It relieved mÿ drooping Spirits it dissipated in part the deep gloom, which has latelÿ taken possession of me—listen—mÿ Dear! I have one friend yet left—he would Soothe mÿ Sorrows—was he in the neighbourhood, altho he participated...
Mr. Alex. Bryant Johnson returned me the ms—Had I more time I Should be tempted to write a geogological history of a part of this western world—Say between the little falls and Lakes—but now I give it up, and, nevertheless, can not cease of collecting materials. I lately finished a treatise—on agriculture—I ought rather to Say—its Skeleton—but it remains yet in the brouillon. And now I am...
Never Shall be obliterated the few days, which I enjoy’d at Quincÿ—I fostered allways indeed a faint hope—to See you once more, and know, that I Should meet with a cordial reception—but never my ardent imagination did reach to that which I received—From you I expected all the warmth of an old friend—but—even if I was more presumtuous—I could laÿ no claim whatever on the numerous civilities,...
I hope not, that your Excellencÿ will find me troublesome, that I soo often intrude myself upon you. It is some mere Leisure, this winter, occasioned by mÿ intendeth departure to the Western Parts, which I can spent with my Librarÿ and which affords me if not an opportunity, at least an excuse, for adressing a few Lines to your Excellency. However it would be pardonable, if I did judge, bÿ the...
I delay’d to write you a few lines—to congratulate you cordially on the happy arrival of the 30th of Oct—and join your Relatives and frends in celebrating the anniversary of your 89 Birthday fostering the hope, that before this time I might have Seen a happy desired conclusion in our Legislature—with regard to the Presidential election—But the caucus-cabal thus far disappointed me in my ardent...
At lenght I take again mÿ pen, to assure you of the high respect, with which I am So fortunate to feel mÿ bosom glow for the un-appreciated blessings, which you have bestowed on a dear an ungrateful Countrÿ, for the kindness, which with you continue to honour your old frend—and what less can I return to the man, of whom a Washington declared, that none could more cordially than himself approve...
Much time has elapsed indeed, Since you have favoured me with your last Letters—and more, Since I dropt to you my last line—I do not plead another excuse than my particular Situation—Tho at times I was not in want of leisure, to acquit meself of an incumbent duty, but then mÿ mind was not often enough composed, and a numerous correspondence within and without this continent imposed imperiously...
After your Excellency’s advice, for which I am much obliged, I wrote, by this Sloop, to his Excellency the President, State the affair, and requested his interference so far, as He maÿ think proper, and I flatter my Self, that it wil be promoted bÿ you in the Same manner. But this occasion Sir! is to favourable, not to make use of it, in enlarging—for a moment upon a particular article of your...
At lenght I have been able to peruse Condorcet’s book—It can not be difficult to you, to conjecture, what impression it must have on mÿ mind. If I had bestowed on it onlÿ Superficial attention, its aim wuld not have escaped me, although I had not been assisted bÿ your correct marginal notes—It is a genuine ofspring of the School of the famous Sÿsteme de la Nature. It is not less daring in its...
When I send you last mail Basanistes, I was so much tortured with head–ache—that it was not in my power, to join to it one single line. The Post-master at first objected—if thus the postage comes higher than you might wish, I only executed your orders but should request—in that case to wait rather for a safe opportunity Perhaps—however—his scruples are unfounded. You render me nearly enamoured...
Having in so long a time not received a word from Quincÿ, although I was freed from all anxiety about your wellfare mrs Guild and her amiable sister Catherine, both having informed me, that you continued to enjoy not only a hum cum dignitate, which would be nothing new—but all possible happiness that can fall to the share of human mind, while your excellent Lady’s gratification must have...
I indulge once more in the gratification—of Sending you a few lines, in the hope, that you enjoy So much health as generally has fallen to my Share—if I except, my weakened Sight, which renders—reading at night nearly impracticable, while it requires my utmost exertions by day light to decypher the Records—and a nearly three weeks confinement, in consequence of a Severe contusion of my right...
Since the 7th of Febr—I did not receive a line from my frend—but having been honoured with two Letters of your Ladÿ, without a hint, that your health was not So good, and having read in the N. papers—that you were present at a festival at Boston, I presume, that other more Serious occupations kept you employ’d—or that Letter writing became rather to you a penible task, whenever you could not...
How can I make a return for your favors which you continue to bestow upon me—as having nothing to offer besides an unfeigned gratitude. Had I an higher opinion of mÿ Letters, whose acceptance I chiefly owe to your indulgent kind partiality: and would saÿ with Horace—Gaudes Carminibus, carmina possumus Donare—Now I have not even this plea—but I have three of your Letters before me— I have been...
I will trÿ to answer your very kind favour of Sept. 3—as the chilly weather and a violent pain in my Shoulder, occasioned by having yesterday worked to excess, and imprudently exposed myself to rain, without changing cloaths, when returning home, for which I now do penance, forbids to do a great deal in mÿ garden. Was your residence nearer I would Soon forget pain, recruit my Strenght, and...
I thank my God, that I enjoy the high gratification in congratulating you with the tribute, paid, so handsomely, by your enlightened fellow-citizens—to your talents virtues and Character;—to render my bliss perfect, and this may not be expected here—I ought to have been at your side, at Montezillo, and seen you, which crowns the Splendid Eulogÿ of New-England—possessing yet—firmness enough, to...
Again a few lines from your old friend, who continuallÿ receives fresh proofs of your unabated attachment. I owed to your distinguishing friendship, that I have been honored once more with a valuable Letter of your Ladÿ, which filled my breast with joÿ, and makes me nearly belief, that I must possess Something, worth noticing—to have in So far attracted her notice—I do not longer Suspect that...
Mÿ occupations in gathering seeds—and preparing my fields and garden for ensuing spring have thus far prevented my answering the favour, with which I was honored bÿ you last month—Tho’ mÿ hope of receiving, before this time, a decision about the Achaic Republick, had influenced this delaÿ. I sent it to Philadelphia, where my correspondent J. Mifflin will charge himself with super intending the...
I Shall now make an experiment, if I can dispell a malignant Spirit of gloom, which hovers about me, without any other incantation besides acknowledging your both Favours of the 4th and the 9th of april with which I was So kindly honoured by you. Indeed—Sir! this intercourse is nearly the only pastime left me in my deep retreat and then mÿ Situation imperiously often forbids me to indulge...
Long time since I should have acknowledged your favour of 12 March had I not hesitated, to interrupt your Excellency’s dignified retirement. To continue, however, in Silence could Seem, that I undervalued the honor, of your Excellency’s condescending, in communicating with me his ideas about a Subject, intended, to promote the Public good. Encouraged by your Excell: flattering opinion, I...
yes, I am thankful—I am Sensible of my high obligations towards you—how few can follow your example! to remember a friend—in the days of prosperity deserves praise, but to do So in the hour of Sorrow—to Set this a Side to Sooth his anguish is not common—I knew—you did So, and if it was possible, that I could doubt it, the few affectionate lines from your own hand would have dispelled it—She is...
It is Long ago, that I was honoured with your favour of Dec. 6 and April 18—in which your Excellency communicated with me the unhappy situation of the worthy Luzac, worthy indeed the high encomiums, which you have bestowed on him, and more so to have merited in such high a degree your Excellency esteem and adprobation. I should have sooner accused this favour, had I not feared to interrupt...
My Sending the wreath unaccompanied bÿ a Single line was occasioned bÿ a Short excursion to Sacket’s Harbour—to take a view of the boasted powerful defence of our frontiers, after the Surprise of Ogdensburg, courted So long bÿ the iterated incursions on the defenceless and peaceble Canadiens. It was indeed a Severe retaliation from which the Inhabitants Shall not recover in manÿ years—although...