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Mr. Adams’s Compliments to Mr. Van der Kemp and asks the favour of his Company this Evening at the golden Lyon, to Spend the Evening and Sup with a chosen few of honest Americans. RC ( PHi : John Adams Letters). For François Adriaan Van der Kemp, a Mennonite minister and supporter of the U.S. and Patriot causes, see JA, Diary and Autobiography Diary and Autobiography of John Adams , ed. L. H....
I have received your agreable favour of the fifth of this Month, Commodore Gillon was absent, when your Letter came to hand, and for many days after. As soon as he returned, I took the first Opportunity to Speak with him, on the subject of your Friend the Clergyman. The Commodore has no Chaplain and his Crew is composed of People of various Religions, the greatest Part however are Frenchmen...
I am this moment honoured with your Letter of Yesterdays date and I thank you for your kind Congratulations, on the News from America. May Great Britain ever Send to America, while she continues to send any, only such brave, able, active and enterprizing Generals as Cornwallis and Burgoine. Every Such General will consume them an Army of Ten or Fifteen Thousand Men, every Campain, without...
I have received your Letter, and am much concerned to perceive your Apprehensions that Affairs might take an unfavourable Turn. The Questions you do me the Honour to propose to me, are very difficult to Answer. I have ever been Scrupulous of advising Strangers to emigrate to America. There are difficulties to be encountered in every Exchange of Country. Arising from the Climate soil, Air,...
As I had suffered much anxiety on your account during your Imprisonment, your Letter of the 29. of last month gave me some relief. I rejoiced to find that you was at liberty and out of danger. inclosed are two Letters, which I hope may be of Service to you.—living is now cheaper, than it has been, in America, and I doubt not you will Succeed very well.—You will be upon your guard, among the...
Your agreable Letter of the 9. Jan. has lain too long unanswered.—Mr Mappa, I should be happy to present to the President and to serve in any other Way in my Power. Your Criticisms upon “The defence” deserve more Consideration than I have time to give them. I can say for myself, and I believe for most others, who have ever been called “leading Men,” in the late Revolution, that We were...
Your favour of March 17. is recd.—The French Revolution will, I hope produce Effects in favour of Liberty Equity and Humanity, as extensive as this whole Globe and as lasting as all time.—But I will candidly own that the Form of Government they have adopted, can, in my humble opinion, be nothing more than a transient Experiment. an Obstinate Adhœrence to it, must involve France in great and...
Your letter of the 9. ult. has been a circuit to Philadelphia and returned to me, only on Saturday last. Your friendly Congratulations, on a late Re election, are very obliging. I am as well as you, and have been these Eighteen years a Friend of Governor Clinton: but, although I feel no Resentment at his consenting to stand a Candidate for the office I held, I cannot but regret that he yields...
Before I left The Massachusetts I had the Pleasure of receiving a Letter from you: But I learned from it, with Some Uneasiness that you meditate a Removal to a greater distance from us. I had Yesterday another Letter from you of the 23 of November. I thank you for introducing to me, Major Peter Van Gaesbeek, whom however I have not yet had the Pleasure to see as he happened to call when I was...
I have just now received your kind Letter of the 3d of this month. I read every Thing which falls in my Way, which relates to the French Revolution: but I Suffer inexpressible Pains, from the bloody feats of War and Still more from those of Party Passions. Disgrace to the Cause of Liberty, and a general Depravation of hearts and manners among the rising Generation, is much to be dreaded from...
I received this morning, your kind favour of the 9th. of this month dated at Kempwick at the Oneida Lake. Your Letters always give me Pleasure, both as they contain interesting Reflections, upon public Affairs and as I take an interest in every Thing that relates to yourself and your family, believing as I do, your inflexible Integrity and wishing you every Prosperity. I am very glad, the...
The Reverend Dr Belknap and Dr Morse being upon a Journey into your Neighbourhood I have been desirous that they Should have an Opportunity of Seeing you, and that you Should have an Opportunity of Seeing them. They are clergy men of great Fame and what better of great Merit. I have not add any Thing more , assurances of unva esteem humble sert PHi : John Adams Papers.
I have recd your favour of the 10. of Nov. and thank you for the quotations from the Posthumous Works of the late K. of Prussia. The Quotations from Condorcet are Proofs of Insincerity or Inconsistency but the latter may be easily expected from a Person who writes upon a subject he knows nothing of. I am able unfortunately to give you some Extracts of letters concerning a Man of more Sense,...
I have just received your favor of the 20th of Jan. & am sensibly touched with the remembrance of our learned & ingenious friend whom I saw at the red Lyon in Leyden I thank you for his poems. Whether you will find purchasers for the edition of his juvenile poems you meditate I cannot say. My Countrymen I fear do not sufficiently attend to Greek & Latin after they leave College, perhaps not...
I have recd your favour of the 13th and thank you for your Zeal for the honor of my “Defence”. That Work which was begun on the 4 of October 1786 and finished on the 26 of December 1787 was written in haste. It was not the fruit of twenty Years Labour like Montesquieus & Gibbons and as it was written in haste may be supposed to have marks enough of Inaccuracy. I am not yet sensible of any...
I have received your favor of the 13th and thank you for your zeal for the honor of my “defence”. That work, which was begun on the 4th of October 1786 & finished on the 26th of December 1787, was written in haste. It was not the fruit of twenty years labor, like Montesquieu’s & Gibbon’s, and as it was written in haste, may be supposed to have marks enough of inaccuracy. I am not yet sensible...
I last night recd your favour of the 19 Dec, it Should be I presume 19 Jan. The Compliments you make me on this new year, are very flattering to the Vanity of an old Man: but there is one very wicked one among them, I mean when you insinuate that intriguing Individuals, when I am no more, will join in my Eulogies to defame my Successor . When it happens if I know it I shall laugh in my grave,...
I thank you for your favor of 24th Ult. I return the letter with the oration, because they are inseperably connected. I think the latter worth printing, at least as much so, as many others on the same occasion. I return it to you to save you the trouble of again transcribing it. Since you insist upon it, I am willing to think myself young, as long as the admonitions to the contrary are not too...
I had last night your letter of the 12th. the friendly Sentiments of which have tenderly affected me. The Affliction in my family from the melancholly death of a once beloved Son, has been very great, and has required the Consolations of Religion as well as Phylosophy to enable Us to Support it. The Perspects of that unfortunate youth were once pleasing and promising: but have been cutt off...
Your favour of the 20 of June has been long on its Journey. I cannot recollect, in detail, the particulars of the Conversation you allude to at Mr De Neuvilles.—Capellen de Poll was a noble man by Nature. A frank, manly, generous Soul. Wherever I have met such spirits I have always felt them. Capellen was frequently with the Reports fabricated by the Anglomanes, representing the affairs of...
I have recd your favor of the 5th of July with your Letter to Chanceller Livingston on Some Points of the natural History of Buffon and Jefferson, and your other Letter to Gerrit Boon. Col. Lincklain by whom you Sent them has not favoured me with a Visit—if he Should I Shall Shew him all the Civility in my Power. I have read the Letters with great pleasure. There are too many Subjects of...
I thank you for your favour of the 3. oct....I Should be obliged to your friend Mr Mappa if he would commit to writing a description of the Phenomena, he observed in the Eastern Asiatic Seas; and the various species of foam which he saw floating on the waves and thought preparatory matter for testaceous and crustaceous fishes. The Spat, or Eggs of oysters, float on the Waves, and are deposited...
I have recd your favors of the third, and am much obliged to you and to Mr. Mappa for your Observations on the generation of shell fish &c My Privilege of franking extends to all Letters and Packetts. I return your letter to Chandler Livingston with this, and will return that to Mr. Boon, in a short time. I can afford you no ideas on the Subject of the mammoth because I have none. The Spirit...
I now return your remarks on Jefferson and Buffon. If I had your permission I would communicate them to the American Academy of Arts & sciences. I think them valuable. The panegyricks upon these philosophers are however too sublime for the region of New England, and would diminish the useful influence of your observations. I sent your letter to Livingston sometime ago I am as usual MHi : Adams...
I have received your letter of the 1. of June and read your Sketch of the Achaic Republick. It is a valuable Addition to American Litterature, and richly deserves to be printed. It will do Some good. I fear however, that all Men in Power will generally Say with Oliver Cromwell, on reading Harringtons Oceana, that they will not be frightened out of their Power by a few paper Shot. I should be...
I have recd yours of Aug. 1802. I agree with you that “the deadly infection has not Spread thro every Limb.” But what Shall We Say when Such a Writer as Mr Callender, can write down the Administration of Washington, write up an administration of Jefferson and then write it down again. The Editors of Newspapers, have no Check, and yet have Power to make and Unmake Characters, at their Will; to...
Looking over, this morning what I wrote yesterday, I thought I would extend a little what was said of France. I wish our good Men who write so much about Barrel and Robertson , would make themselves acquainted with La Harpe. He has written 14 or 15 volumes of a course of Litterature, at the Lycæum, in which is a great deal concerning the French Revolution. I have read the work. If you have...
"Il ne vaut pas un sou d’etre votre ami" Said Count Sarsofield to me, on day in London.—Upon a curious occasion which I will explain to you another time. Mean while I believe you will find that he estimated my Friendship at as much as it was worth. My Correspondence is not worth one groat. I am more occupied in gathering Seeds and preparing Fields than you are if I may judge by the fruits of...
I have recd your favor of the 15th of December.—I am not disappointed, through I regret the answer you have received from Mr Mifflin. I believe it impossible to get a Printer in America to undertake the publication of your Work. Such Studies are not to the Taste of our People. There is a Gentleman in Philadelphia, Mr Joseph Dennie, Editor of the Portfolio, who I believe would print it by...
I received your favour of July 17th. on Saturday. I received and read with pleasure your Essay on the use of Copper among the Greeks and inclosed it immediately by the Post, to Mr Bordley of Philadelphia as you directed. The Remarks on Jefferson and Buffon I presented with my own hand to the Accademy at their last Meeting, which was in May. It was referred to the Committee, to whose...
Last night I recd your favor of 15 of Feb. At the two last Meetings of our Academy I made Inquiry concerning your Manuscript, and found that the committee had referred it to a Sub committee who were not then present and had not reported. I will endeavour to get this matter settled at the next meeting, in May. Buffon, I presume from all that I have heard or read of him believed in nothing but...
I have received your favor of October 15 and all the others that you mention, I believe, although I have not been able regularly to acknowledge the receipt of them. I thank you for the two Lectures. I have not been able to procure any information relative to the N.W. Coast, which might be usefull to you. Mr Barrell is no more and I never could learn whether Mr Ingrahams Journal has been...
I have, after so long a time, been favored with a loan of four Volumes of Captain Joseph Ingraham’s Journals of his voyage to the North West Coast of America, round Cape Horn, in the Brigantine Hope of Seventy Tons burthen. He sailed from Boston on the 16th. of September 1790. In these he often Speaks of a voyage he made the year or two before, in the Columbia, and refers to his Journal of it....
Until your wishes & enquiries shall be known concerning, Ingraham’s Journal, I see nothing more likely to afford you amusement, than that part in which he seems to believe, that he had added somewhat to our Stock of Geographical Knowledge. In the 2d. volume the first page of which he has marked 52 or book 2 ch:4, he says—"1791 April 19, We steered NNW from the Island of Dominica and at 4...
This day I recd your favour of the 15 of last month you and I are in the same predicament. You are buried and forgotten as you Say in the Western Wilderness, and I am buried and forgotten at Mount Wollaston: But I believe you are happier than you were when bustling in Holland, and I am very Sure I have been happier for these four years passed than I ever was in any four of forty years before...
Your favor of Feb. 25th. is recd.—Ingraham, I think, must be no further North than the 56th: degree, but when I can find a little time, I will read his Journal again and if I find any thing that will entertain you, perhaps I may transmit it. Rumphius, whom you quote is unknown to me. If what he says, which corresponds with my Observation in the generation of shell fish on the Surface of the...
Having lamented for sometime, the loss of my Correspondent at Barneveldt, I was, this morning unexpectedly gratified with your favour of the twenty second of December. I return with pleasure the Compliments and congratulations of the Season. I can sincerely unite with you, in humble Thanks to the Almighty for the Blessings of the past year on you and your Family as well as on me and mine.—But...
That showers of hot stones or cold stones may have fallen, in the neighbourhood of Volcanoes, is not impossible, nor improbable: but it is impossible that, any projectile force of exploding Mercury or any mixture of Sulphur Nitre and carbon, or any Vapour, could drive these stones to any great hight in the air, or ever ballance them in the Air so as to allow them to sail about in it like...
I have never doubted, that America would be added to the vast Catalogue of Nations, who would not be Saved by Precepts nor Examples. Nothing but a ballanced Government can Save any nation from the Tyranny of the many the few or the one, and no Nation ever was long united in understanding or preserving a ballance. England has preserved it longer than any nation ever did before, and England but...
I have always believed that the Afra Avis, was the Guinea Hen, but have lately heard it was the Turkey. You say “Alass poor Europe” – I say “ alass poor human nature.” I am as weary, as my friend the Abby Raynall, with contemplating the Stupidity of one part of Man kind and the Villany of the other: but I cannot say with him, if they are never to be wiser and better may they be annihilated....
In your Letter of the seventh of July, you flatter me, with very high Eulogies, and compleat the Climax of them, with the opinion of Washington.—For the future I pray you to spare yourself the trouble of quoting that great Authority in my favour. Although no Man has more settled opinion of his Integrity and Virtues than myself, I nevertheless desire that my Life Actions and Administration may...
Upon my Word and honour, if I know myself, and for any Thing I know to the contrary, I am Alive, and wide awake, and in as good health as usual, and have been So for Several years past, excepting now and then Such a Cold as that which you cured with a Bottle of Old Hoch and a pound or two of Veal Cutletts for Supper three Evenings Successively. Pray tell me.—Is it actionable or indictable to...
you have Spent your Winter with delight as well as Industry. My Moments have neither produced pleasure or improvements to be compared to yours. I am obliged to be very œconomical of my sight. Though I can See very well, with Glasses, or without them My Eyes cannot bear fatigue as they did when they were young. you have Sett me a Task that will infallibly make me blind before it will be...
I sympathize with you in all your Expressions of grief in your favour of Nov. 1st. at the melancholly Catastrophy of so many worthy persons your friends at Leyden and elsewhere. You derive consolation from the only source from which it can be drawn.—If I knew of any other I would joyfully administer it to you, as well as to myself.— Hunc solem et Stellas et decedentia certis Tempora momentis,...
You were a Letter in my debt, when you wrote yours of March 17th but you did not know it. I wrote you Some months ago, and asked the favour of you to inform me, what is the Christian Name the Place of Residence, and the present Titles of our Friend Mr De Gyselaer, formerly Pensionary of Dort. I had particular reasons for this Inquiry which you would not disapprove, though I am not at present...
You have puzzled and confounded me, by your Letter of the 3 of Aug.—After allarming me with Some Suggestions or Suspicions of Infidelity in the Post office you Say “I Suppose the Crime is perpetrated in Massachusetts. Look at the inclosed Sealing. it is from you?” I thought this gave me a Right and made it my duty to open it, and Lo! a lovely Letter from your amiable Daughter to your worthy...
The inclosed Letter came under cover, to me in a letter from your father dated the 3d. of August. After hinting that there had been some unfair play in the Post Office he says “I suppose the Crime is perpetrated in Massachusetts—Look at the inclosed sealing. It is from you?” I looked at the sealing and concluded there was something within to unriddle the mystery. I accordingly clipped the...
In answer to your kind Inquiries concerning my health, in your favour of the 14th, I can inform you that I enjoy as good health as a Man in his fifteenth Lustre, can reasonably expect, except a little paralytic trembling in the hands, which does not much incommode me however in Writing. I have been engaged this Summer as you have in reading History. Voltaires Moeurs et Esprit des Nations and...
I have yours of the 18. Jan. When you receive your Diploma you will have no fees to pay. We have not yet adopted any regulation which requires fees from the Members elected. Perhaps it would be prudent in future to adopt Such a Measure and give a Salary to our Secretary. Our Officers are now Men of So much Business and So dependent on their Business for the Support of their families that they...
I have received your kind Letter of 28. of November and another Some time ago that I have not answered. I rejoice with you in all your Prosperity, particularly in the happy Marriage of your Son; and sympathize in all your Sorrows, more especially in the Misfortune of your son Friend Vreede, whom I remember well. Happy are you in your various Learning and the Enjoyment of your Books. I can read...