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    • Jefferson, Thomas
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    • Thomson, Charles
    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Author="Jefferson, Thomas" AND Correspondent="Thomson, Charles" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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Your letter of Nov. 20. 1779. came safe, tho lately, to hand. The future acts of our assembly I shall take care regularly to transmit, as also such of those past since the institution of the commonwealth as can be procured: for they are become scarce. I have in my own collection of pamphlets some few duplicates which I will also forward to you as soon as I shall be able to examine them, for...
I received notice from the secretary of the American Philosophical society some time ago that they had done me the honour of appointing me a counsellor of that body. The particular duties of that office I am quite a stranger to, and indeed know too little of the nature of their institution to judge what objects it comprehends. In framing answers to some queries which Monsr. de Marbois sent me,...
I received your favor of the 16th. last night. I was out when it was delivered, so know not how it came; a circumstance no otherwise important than as I am at a loss how or where to enquire for the packet which should have accompanied it containing the commissions, instructions &c. I shall immediately however make the enquiry. I am obliged to you for the order for the journals. I shall make...
I am to acknowlege the receipt of your favour of June 18. You will learn by the letters &c. which go in this packet that this world is all going to war. Thank god our’s is out of their vortex. Holland and the emperor are the only powers which appear as yet: but I have no doubt that the spring will lead France, Prussia and the Porte into the feild on one side and Russia on the other. England...
[ Paris, 8 Feb. 1785 . Entry in SJL reads: “Chas. Thomson. Receipt his of Oct. 26.—send letters by Fr. packet. If secret, and not cyphered desire N. J[amieson] to confide to passenger. Span. incroachment not probable—peace and war doubtful—Bav. & Austr. neth.—consequence of repeated lies of Eng. papers towards lowering respect to us. Important to recover their respect—paiment of debts,...
Your favour of Mar. 6. is come duly to hand. You therein acknowlege the receipt of mine of Nov. 11. At that time you could not have received my last of Feb. 8. At present there is so little new in politicks, literature, or the arts that I write rather to prove to you my desire of nourishing your correspondence, than of being able to give you any thing interesting at this time. The political...
By Mr. Houdon I send you a copy of my notes. I also send 100 copies of the paper I left with you on our coinage. Printing is so cheap here (they cost me but a guinea) that I thought it worth while to print as many copies as would enable you to put one into the hands of every member of Congress when they should enter on the subject, and to do the same at any succeeding session when they should...
The last letter received from you was of Mar. 6. Since that I have written one to you of June 21. by Mr. Otto, and another of July 14. by Mr. Houdon. In yours of Mar. you express a wish of an opportunity of getting the Cylinder lamp. Colo. Senf going to America furnishes me an opportunity of sending you one, which you must do me the favor to accept. There is but one critical circumstance in...
In one of your former letters you expressed a wish to have one of the newly invented lamps. I find them made here much better than at Paris, and take the liberty of asking your acceptance of one which will accompany this letter. It is now found that any tolerable oil may be used in them. The Spermaceti oil is best of the cheap kinds. I could write you volumes on the improvements which I find...
Having written to you on the 22nd. Ult. from London, I should not so soon have troubled you again but for a special case. A particular Botanical friend of mine at this place has written to Charlestown, to one Watson (the Bartram of that place) for a number of plants and seeds. The former will be sent next fall, the latter perhaps earlier. There being no direct conveiance between Charlestown...
This will be handed you by a Gentleman of the Family of Lecoutoux who is going with his wife to Settle himself as a farmer in Someone of the middle States of America. As his Establishment will not be great, it is the more important that it be judiciously made. Being acquainted with his family, they have asked of me lettres of recommendations for him. Knowing no person better acquainted than...
A dislocation of my right wrist has for three months past disabled me from writing except with my left hand, which was too slow and awkward to be employed but in cases of necessity. I begin to have so much use of my wrist as to be able to write, but it is slowly and in pain. I take the first moment I can however to acknowlege the receipt of your letters of Apr. 6. July 8. and 30. In one of...
Your favor of April 28. did not come to my hands till the 1st. inst. Unfortunately the boxes of plants, which were a day too late to come by the April packet, missed the packet of June 10. also, and only came by that of July 25. They are not yet arrived at Paris, but I expect them daily. I am sensible of your kind attention to them, and that as you were leaving New York you took the course...
The bearer hereof is Mr. Warville who is already probably known to you by his writings, and particularly that on France and the United states. He is moreover a person of great worth, politically and morally speaking, and his acquaintance will give you great satisfaction. Permit me therefore to introduce him to the honour of your acquaintance, and to ask for him those attentions and civilities...
The bearer hereof Monsieur le Chevalier de Saint-Trys is strongly recommended to me by Monsieur de Meusnier author of the part of the new Encyclopedie which relates to Economie—politique et diplomatique, of which I sent a copy to Congress. I am sufficiently assured of his worth to take the liberty of recommending him to your notice, and civilities, which will be greatly gratifying to him, as...
Mr. Madison and myself have been in the constant purpose, as soon as the roads should get a little smooth, to ride out some morning and pay our respects to you: the late rains have disappointed us in that respect. The Philosophical society have appointed a committee, of which you are named, to collect materials for forming the natural history of the Hessian fly, the best means of preventing or...
I see by the newspapers your translation of the Septuagint is now to be printed, & I write this to pray to be admitted as a Subscriber. I wish it may not be too late for you to reconsider the size in which it is to be published. folios & Quartos are now laid aside because of their inconvenience. every thing is now printed in 8vo. 12mo. or petit format. the English booksellers print their first...
I thank you, my dear & antient friend, for the two volumes of your translation which you have been so kind as to send me. I have dipped into it at the few moments of leisure which my vocations permit, and I percieve that I shall use it with great satisfaction on my return home. I propose there, among my first emploiments, to give to the Septuagint an attentive perusal, and shall feel the aid...
An acquaintance of 52. years, for I think ours dates from 1764. calls for an interchange of notice now & then that we remain in existence, the monuments of another age, and examples of a friendship unaffected by the jarring elements, by which we have been surrounded, of revolutions, of government, of party & of opinion. I am reminded of this duty by the receipt, thro’ our friend D r Patterson...
I learnt from your last letter , with much affliction, the severe and singular attack your health has lately sustained; but it’s equally singular and sudden restoration confirms my confidence in the strength of your constitution of body and mind, and my conclusion that neither has recieved hurt, and that you are still ours for a long time to come. we have both much to be thankful for in the...