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    • Spafford, Horatio Gates
    • Jefferson, Thomas

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Spafford, Horatio Gates" AND Correspondent="Jefferson, Thomas"
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It is with sentiments of very great respect, but with extreme diffidence, that I offer to obtrude upon thy retirement, & invite again thy labors in the field of science. I ask thy aid. To a mind so constituted, & so long accustomed to exertion in every mean of usefulness to mankind;—I know that, having relinquished thy public employments, the more active exertions of private research will...
I have duly recieved your favor of Apr. 3. with the copy of your General Geography, for which I pray you to accept my thanks. my occupations here have not permitted me to read it through, which alone could justify any judgment expressed on the work. indeed as it appears to be an abridgment of several branches of science, the scale of abridgment must enter into that abridgment judgment....
I am perfectly sensible that my acknowledgement of the due receipt of thy Letter of May 14, 1809 , ought not to have been postponed to this time. As it has been, however, I hope the delay will be attributed to the proper cause. It is but justice to say that, I receive the favor as I ought, & shall certainly not fail to improve the next edition of my Geography, by thy candid corrections....
Could I make thee fully sensible of the sentiments of esteem, & a regard almost reverential, with which I feel impressed on taking my pen to address thee, thou wouldest feel the more disposed either to receive my trifling communications with friendship, or to blame a degree of forwardness in my manner, not reconcilable with propriety, unless on the score of sentiments of good-will, & an ardent...
My Gazetteer of the State of New York being nearly out of press, I seize an occasion which my ardent wishes afford, p to present my respects, & enquire how I can forward thee a copy, without too great expense. Pardon me, my venerable friend, should the truth seem like folly; for, on this occasion, I can hardly refrain from tears. Addressing one of the venerable Fathers of our Republic, & one...
Your favor of the 2 d inst. is duly recieved and I thank you for the mark of attention it expresses in proposing to send me a copy of your new Gazetteer. it will come safely to me under cover by the ordinary mail. but I owe abundant additional thanks for the kind expressions of respect which the letter conveys to me. at the end of a career thro’ a long course of public troubles, if my...
Thy favor of the 15. inst. , is duly received, & I hasten to send the book , by the Mail. I hope it will arrive safe, & find thee enjoying good health, & all the consolations that belong to a liberal benefactor to his country, in the evening of a well spent life. After thou shalt have examined the Gazetteer, I should be glad to hear thy opinion of its merits. The preface tells of the expense &...
I was duly favored with thy obliging favor of last autumn , & immediately sent the Gazetteer as directed. Did it arrive safe? & how dost thou like it? But, this is only a minor cause of my writing at this time, though I confess myself anxious to learn thy opinion of my Work. I am tired of this unceasing jargon of politics, with which I am surrounded, this warring of principle against no...
I am so frequently asked, ‘how does President Jefferson like the Gazetteer ,’ or ‘what does he say of it,’ that I hope thou wilt excuse my anxiety to learn. Possibly it may not have reached thee. I sent one in the Mail , a long time since. If that miscarried, I would send another. I must not trouble thee with a long Letter, but permit to add assurances of my wishes for thy health & happiness....
I am an unpunctual correspondent at best. while my affairs permit me to be within doors, I am too apt to take up a book, and to forget the calls of the writing table. besides this I pass a considerable portion of my time at a possession so distant, and uncertain as to it’s mails that my letters always await my return here. this must apologise for my being so late in acknoleging your two favors...