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    • Smith, William Loughton
    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Smith, William Loughton" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 1-10 of 21 sorted by date (descending)
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13 September 1801, Lisbon. No. 54. Obtained an audience of leave on 9 Sept. after “a pressing renewal of my application”; encloses a copy of his address. Plans to depart for Falmouth within a day or two. Has settled his accounts with Bulkeley, whom he has introduced to João de Almeida, the minister of foreign affairs, as the agent of communications from the U.S. Transmits a letter from the...
16 August 1801, Lisbon. No. 53. Has assured Portuguese minister of foreign affairs that closing of American mission was not motivated by unfriendliness or disrespect. Portugal has canceled plans to send a minister to Washington. Has not yet had audience of leave. Treaty between Spain and Portugal has been printed in Spain; stipulations have not yet been fulfilled by either party as British...
28 July 1801, Lisbon . No. 52. Acknowledges receipt, on 25 July, of JM’s letter of 1 June informing him that the American legation in Portugal will be closed as an economy measure. Has applied for an audience with Portuguese foreign ministry to take leave. Comments on the constitutional prohibition against his receiving gifts from the government. Notes that Portuguese minister to U.S. is about...
21 July 1801 , “ Cintra, near Lisbon .” Reports “that our little Squadron arrived at Gibraltar the 1st. of this month: it’s arrival is very opportune & I trust will be attended with great advantages.” Gives an account of recent British-French naval battle at Algeciras. Notes that Portuguese remain on war footing because French have yet to ratify peace signed at Badajoz. Speculates on Spanish...
14 July 1801, Lisbon. No. 51. Acknowledges JM’s letter of 21 May and reports that he has notified Portuguese foreign ministry of impending arrival of U.S. naval force in Mediterranean. Discusses peace negotiations between Portugal and Spain and likelihood that Britain will be forced to surrender its influence with Portuguese. Understands “from good authority” that Anthony Merry’s mission to...
6 July 1801, Lisbon. Reports a British naval force cruising between Lisbon and Cádiz. Its purpose is probably to prevent Spain from reinforcing Egypt or attacking Portugal and perhaps to transport Portuguese royal family to Brazil. Discusses French troop movements in Spain, the likelihood that Napoleon will demand more favorable terms than his brother Lucien exacted from Portuguese at Badajoz,...
30 June 1801, Lisbon. No. 50. Transmits official word to U.S. government of the death of the prince of Beira. Speculates that Napoleon will refuse to ratify peace treaty signed at Badajoz. Encloses copy of letter received from O’Brien, dated 24 May, but does not share O’Brien’s hope that dey of Algiers will be helpful in mediating U.S. conflict with Tripoli. Fears that some American...
20 June 1801, Lisbon. No. 49. Reports that peace agreement signed at Badajoz has been sent to Paris for ratification by first consul and is being considered in Lisbon. Speculates on details of treaty and comments on Portuguese resistance, which he believes was “the best defence that could be expected, considering the actual scarcity of provisions, the smallness of their numbers and their want...
12 June 1801, Lisbon. Announces signing of peace treaty between Portuguese and Spanish-French, which reportedly contains provisions removing British from Portugal and placing French troops in key garrisons. Hopes soon to have a copy to transmit. Reports death of prince of Beira (age seven) and recent birth of a child to the wife of regent. RC ( DNA : RG 59, DD , Portugal, vol. 5). 1 p.; marked...
5 June 1801, Lisbon. No. 48. Received on 24 May, from Humphreys, enclosed communications from Barbary “of an old date,” along with O’Brien’s 5 Apr. circular letter; observes of war with Tripoli: “I entertain a hope that the Evil will not be very extensive, and that by the chastisement of that Regency we shall consolidate our peace with those of Algiers and Tunis.” Encloses translation of...