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    • Shaw, William Smith
    • Adams, John Quincy

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Shaw, William Smith" AND Correspondent="Adams, John Quincy"
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The Secretary of State has just informed the President, that he was writeing to you and would be happy in incloseing any letters from him. The Presidents engagements, being such, as not to allow him to improve the present opportunity, desires that I would write you a few lines. We left Quincy on the 30 Sept. and arrived in this city on the 10th of Oct. By letters from my Aunt of the 6th we...
To receive the money, from John Green—and settle with Captain Brazier for the blinds. To receive the monies on the Accounts of Mr: Poor, of Newbury-Port. of Mr: W. Coolidge P. C. Brooks. of Mr: McIntire of Captn: Fenno. To attend to the Exon: of H. College vs Simpson. Do:—on the actions at Dedham. To receive on the 18th: of Novr: $140:89—for Rent of the House in Court Street, and $150 every...
I see by the newspapers that a tenth assessment has been made on the Neponset Bridge Shares; of $38 on each share; which of course makes my shares chargeable with $228—for the payment of which I will thank you to receive, Whitcomb’s quarter’s rent due 1. January next;—this will be $200—and the balance, please to pay from any balance you may have in your hands—If you have none, I will send you...
I have received under cover from you two letters for Mr Stokes, which I delivered as soon as received The inclosed letter Mrs. Whitcomb gave me yesterday—The letter from Russel & Cutler I transmit at this request Mr Russels request You will probably have seen Ben Russell’s paper of last Saturday, a scrap of which I now send you, containing an extract of a letter, pretending to be from...
I received last evening with much pleasure your favour of the 5th: instt:—I had been so long without any intelligence from home, that I began to be uneasy—And even now, I cannot but wish you had said something about the family at Quincy—I believe it is more than a month since I have heard from thence, at all—I am anxious particularly to know the state of health of my dear mother. I am much...
I received yesterday your favour of the 13th: instt: inclosing a strip from the Centinel for the history of which I am much obliged to you—I had already seen it and have written a long letter to Mr: Hall, containing my observations upon it, which I presume he will communicate either in tenor or substance to you—I do not impute either the writing or the publication of those remarks to a...
I have particular reasons for requesting you to inform me who the member of Congress was, from whom Mr: Russell received the letter he shewed you, containing remarks on my conduct with points of admiration, and the quotation from Virgil—The knowledge of his name will in every probability enable me to make such explanations to him as will be entirely satisfactory to him and to me.—As Mr Russell...
On my return last evening from Atkinson where I have passed the last eight days in company with your brother Thomas I had the pleasure to receive your letters of the 23 & 24 ult. with Mr. Tracy’s speech for which I am much obliged to you At present I have only time to say that Mr Stedman was the writer of the letter alluded to in mine of the 13th—Russel when he shew me the letter did not...
I yesterday submitted three resolutions to the consideration of the Senate, of which it is probable you will hear more, and perhaps to some federalists in your quarter, they will be thought as wonderful and as lamentable, as one or two of my votes on former occasions. They were rejected by the Senate, with no small degree of indignation express’d by the majority—The yeas and nays, on the two...
I inclose you two bills, now pending before the two Houses of Congress, which I wish may be immediately published in the newspapers at Boston, as one or the other of them will in all probability pass in some shape or other, and I apprehend will be productive of important consequences not only to the commerce but to the peace of the United States. The zeal upon this occasion is of such burning...