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    • Price, Richard
    • Franklin, Benjamin

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Price, Richard" AND Correspondent="Franklin, Benjamin"
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ALS (mutilated): American Philosophical Society I was in some expectation of seeing you last night in Crane-Court; but not having had this Pleasure I take the liberty to write this to you to put you in [mind] of doing me a favour which I think you gave me Some [reason?] to hope for the last time I Saw you, I mean dining [ torn ] on Holy-thursday, or next thursday Sennight. [Dr. Hawk]esworth,...
Facsimile of ALS : Catalogue of Charles Hamilton Sale, Dec. 13, 1966, p. 95, no. 284. Last Night I received a Letter from Dr. Robertson, acquainting me that the University of Edinburgh have on my Recommendation conferr’d the Degree of Dr. in Divinity upon the Revd. Mr. Cooper of Boston: an Event, that when I last had the Pleasure of seeing you, you may remember I was desirous of waiting for,...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Supposing that the foreign literary Journals do not fall in your Way, I send you the following Account of your late Work, as given in the Bibliotheque des Sciences et des beaux Arts , for January February and March. 1767. After reciting the Title, the Authors say, “On devoit déjà a Mr. Price un excellent Traité sur les principales Questions de la Morale....
Printed from the Royal Society, Philosophical Transactions , LIX (for 1769; London, 1770), 89–125. The document that follows is only in form a letter to Franklin. Price addressed it to him, presumably as a way of acknowledging the latter’s work on population; Franklin transmitted it to the Royal Society, where it was read on April 27 and May 4 and subsequently printed in the Transactions . How...
Printed in the Royal Society, Philosophical Transactions , LX (for 1770; London, 1771), 536–9. I Cannot doubt but that the observation made by your ingenious friend in the paper you sent me is right. The aberration of Venus must, I think, affect the phases of a transit, by retarding them, and not by accelerating them. This retardation is 55½″; for that is the time nearly which Venus, during a...
ALS and draft: American Philosophical Society Permit me to thank you, not only on my own Account for the Book itself you have so kindly sent me, but in Behalf of the Publick for Writing it. It being in my Opinion, (considering the profound Study, and steady Application of Mind that the Work required, the sound Judgment with which it is executed, and its great and important Utility to the...
ALS : American Philosophical Society Inclos’d I send you Dr. Priestly’s last Letter, of which a Part is for you, he says, but the whole seems as proper for you as for me. I did not advise him pro or con , but only explain’d to him my Method of Judging for my self in doubtful Cases, by what I called Prudential Algebra . If he had come to town, and preach’d here some times, I fancy Sir John P....
ALS : American Philosophical Society I have Sent you enclosed Dr. Priestley’s letter to you, together with another which I received from him last night. Indeed I don’t know whether to be glad or Sorry on account of his rejection of Lord Shelburne’s proposal. I love him and am heartily concerned for him and wish he was better provided for. I think myself extremely obliged to you for mentioning...
AL : American Philosophical Society The writer of this presents his best respects and wishes to Dr. Franklin, whom he always thinks of with particular regard. He begs the favour of him to convey the inclosed letters to the persons to whom they are directed. He Supposes Dr. Franklin has frequent opportunities for sending to New: England; and, therefore has taken the liberty to trouble him with...
AL : American Philosophical Society The writer of this presents his best respects to Dr. Franklin. Mr. Brown, the Bearer, is he believes an honest man. Identified by the handwriting.