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It being too late personally to wait on the President, Colonel Pickering respectfully informs That a Committee of Congress on the Military Establishment have wished a communication of the ideas of Colo. Pickering on that subject. The Comtee deemed it improper to ask those of the President; at the same time it seemed apparent that they would be glad to know them. The Committee proposed to meet...
On the petition of John Etienne Guenet —The Secretary of State respectfully reports to the President of the United States That as soon as he received the petition, he obtained a copy of Mr Guenet’s conviction and enquired into the circumstances of his case, and was thence induced to think him not entitled to the pardon he so earnestly solicits. To be the advocate of Mercy is far more grateful...
The Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President the opinion of the Attorney General, just received, upon the threatened intrusions on Indian Lands as stated in Governor Blount’s letter. He has suggested some amendments which appear important; and which if the President pleases the Secretary of State will communicate to the Committee Who have lately reported a new bill for...
I have the honor to request your order on the Secretary of the Treasury for two thousand five hundred dollars, to enable me to pay accounts and bills presented to me by Thomas Fitzsimons Esqr. Chairman of the Committee of Merchants, for expenditures in procuring copies of papers from the British Admiralty Courts in the west Indies in the cases of the captures of American vessels; and to be...
I have not found it easy to form a satisfactory judgement of the situation on the Potowmac most eligible for an arsenal. Several places will very well accommodate such an establishment: but an attentive consideration of all the information I am possessed of, leads me to conclude, that at the fork of the Potowmac and Shenandoah the greatest number of advantages will be united. I now beg leave...
I have this moment recd from Mr Wolcott the inclosed letter to Mr Adet, which this morning I left at Mr Wolcott’s office for his perusal and remarks. He approves of it entirely. I called at Mr Lee’s in the morning for the like purpose, but he was not at home. However, his letter to me (also inclosed) which I received yesterday, shows a concurrence of his opinion in every principle advanced by...
Portland , in the District of Maine .—The works consist of a fort, a citadel, a battery for ten pieces of cannon, an artillery store, a guard house, an air furnace for heating shot, and a covered way from the fort to the battery. The works are substantially executed, excepting the covered way; to complete this, the earth on the spot being of a bad quality, with the necessary supports of stones...
I do myself the honor of enclosing to you, a letter from the Vice Consul of the French Republic (resident at Norfolk) complaining of improper purchases making in this State, by the British Consul and his agents; and calling on the Executive of Virginia for their interference to prevent the injury which those operations threaten to the interest of the French Nation. If the Subjects of the...
Colo. Pickering incloses to Mr Dandridge a memorandum of the Director of the Mint, of copper he has purchased; for the payment of which Mr Dandridge will be so good as to make out an order in the usual form, & present it to the President for his approbation & signature. 6495 lbs. at 2/4 amount to Dollars 2020 67/100. AL , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s...
The Secretary of State has the honour to lay before the President of the U. States a letter received to-day from Mr Deas with a copy of the ratification of the treaty on the part of his Britannic Majesty. Also a letter from Mr Fenwick, one from Mr Cathalan jr consul at Marseilles, & one from Mr Adams. ALS , DNA : RG 59, Miscellaneous Letters; LB , DNA : RG 59, GW’s Correspondence with His...
Mr. Cutting has given to me a perusal of his papers, respecting his agency in revealing our seamen from British impress. He wished my opinion professionally respecting the validity of his claim, which I declined to give, because it would contradict certain maxims I have prescribed to myself with regard to public questions pending while I was part of the administration. But there are reasons...
Colo. Pickering incloses the proceedings from Winchester, with the draught of an answer under the same cover, which Colo. Pickering wrote a number of days since & locked up in a closet at the office of state, where it lay unnoticed till this forenoon. Mr Dandridge will also find inclosed two letters received to day from Mr Monroe, which Mr D. will have the goodness to lay before the President....
At a meeting of the Commissioners of the Sinking fund on the 26th day of December 1795; Present, The President of the Senate, The Secretary of State, The Secretary of the Treasury. A Report of the Secretary of the Treasury was read, as follows. “That to provide for the payment of the Interest on the public debt which will fall due at the close of the present year, it will be necessary to...
By The President’s direction B. Dandridge respectfully transmits to the Secy of State a Memorial of sundry merchants of New York—The President requests the Secretary to return an answer to the Letter from the Committee, which accompanied the Memorial, informing them that the most pointed & strong remonstrances have been made against the Conduct of which they complain. B.D. also encloses a...
I have examined the inclosed papers from the Director of the Mint relative to the purchase of copper for making cents. From the representation of the Director & the conversation I have had with Mr Francis the Purveyor, I believe the terms to be very eligible: I mean the terms on which he proposes to agree with Mr Bilsland. The law of May 8th 1792, requires the President’s approbation of any...
I have read the letter of General Morgan &c. & the Frederick County Resolutions; and the answer which those papers, combined with present circumstances, dictated, I have the honour to inclose. I was led to express my own feelings, upon the ungrateful conduct of many, and the shameless slander of others, respecting the first magistrate of the Union. If the sentiments expressed do not meet your...
The printer of Mr. Randolph’s vindication advertises that it will be published next Friday. The translation of Fauchet’s letter will be in it. This translation was made by Mr. Taylor at Randolph’s request; but Mr. Taylor, who desired the use of mine, told me that he had made but few variations. Now if I have mistaken the sense in any material passages, it is highly probable that they will be...
The Secretary of War prays Mr Dandridge to lay before the President, the reports No. 1. 2. 3 & 4, for the two Houses of Congress. No. 5, on the frigates I shall myself present to the President in perhaps half an hour. No. 6. on the fortifications will require a further examination; but will be ready to-morrow morning. The reports of the Directors of the mint will be ready to send in this...
By the direction of the President of the United States, I have the honour to present herewith—No. 1. A Statement of the present military force of the United States; No. 2. A report of the measures which have been pursued to obtain proper sites for Arsenals; & No. 3. A report of the measures which have been taken to replenish the magazines with military stores; No. 4. A report of the measures...
I learn with concern that the statements from the War department referred to in my speech to Congress, are not yet handed in, & that some Members are ascribing delay of business to the want of information which has been promised, & which they have been expecting. I request that they may be presented without delay. I am always yrs &c. Copy, MHi : Pickering Papers; ADfS , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW ....
The Director of the Mint has prevailed on Joseph Richardson of the city of Philadelphia to accept of the office of Assayer. He has been well recommended to him by the President of the Bank of the United States & others, as well for his skill as his perfect integrity. He will serve until the United States can provide a substitute. The Director requests, if the President approves of him, that...
Some further demands against the Department of State have been presented relative to the expences of procuring documents from the British vice Admiralty Courts in the spoliation cases amounting, with the former, to Dollars 2163.80 On the President’s first order I have received 1000.   remain to be provided for 1163.80 To which I must add the sum due to Captn George Smith (one of the early...
The Secretary of War respectfully lays before the President of the United States the accompanying letters & papers received lately from Govr Blount & Mr Seagrove—the latter yesterday. AL , DLC:GW ; LB , DLC:GW . Pickering may have enclosed a copy of Southwest Territory governor William Blount’s letter to him of 2 Nov., which, in part, reported that “Peace now actually exists between the United...
Topics which have occurred to the Secretary of War as proper to be noticed at the opening of the ensuing session of Congress. 1. The treaty of peace effected by General Wayne with the Indians northwest of the river Ohio. 2. The continuance of peace with the Cherokees. 3. The formal agreement entered into by Mr Seagrove and the Chiefs of the Creek Indians for putting an end to their...
The inclosed instructions to Mr Price, who is to manage the Indian trading store in Georgia, and to Captain Eaton who is to command the troops destined to St Mary’s river, I pray you to lay before the President for his inspection, and approbation or correction. I have this moment finished them. I will wait on the President to receive his orders concerning them either this evening or as early...
I duly received your letter of the 17th. which needed no apology as it will always give me pleasure to comply with any wish of yours connected with the public service, or your personal satisfaction. Good men, in the idea of your appointment to the office of Secretary of State, will find many consolations for your removal from one in which your usefulness was well understood. I wish it was easy...
In my communications to Congress at the opening of the ensuing Session, I shall refer to the department of War for information on the following subjects. A statement of our present Military force—terms of its enlistment —and the disposition thereof—generally. A statement of the fortifications, and defences of the several harbours, agreeably to acts of Congress passed for that purpose. The...
The Secretary of War received yesterday the inclosed letter from Mr Kinlock, desiring the extract from Mr Huger’s letter might be laid before the President: you will have the goodness to present it. Captain Kalteisen, who is an old officer now in the corps of artillery & who has been commanding at Fort Johnson, in Charleston Harbour, being in town, wishes very much to pay his respects to the...
The interest you take in all public measures of importance, and the peculiar solicitude you must feel at this time of general agitation, when so many are busy apparently to undermine the government which you so effectually laboured to establish, and have so eminently contributed to maintain—induce me, with that sincerity which I trust has ever marked my character, and that frankness which an...
The Secretary of War respectfully informs the President of the United States that Henry Abeel, the Cornplanter’s son, is going home, expecting to set off to-day. It has some time been evident that he could derive no advantage by continuing here: I therefore made no objection to his going home; and have fitted him out to his satisfaction. He will wait on the President within half an hour to...