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The two nominations of an associate judge of the supreme court to fill the seat vacated by the death of Judge Cushing, having failed; will you permit me to bring to your recollection a man whom you knew in the House of Representatives, in Philadelphia—Jeremiah Smith of New Hampshire? He is a federalist; but one of great distinction as a lawyer; at the same time, amiable, moderate &...
The President of the United States to Timothy Pickering, Senator for the State of Massachusetts. Certain matters touching the Public good requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Saturday, the 4th day of March next, You are desired to attend at the Senate Chamber in the City of Washington on that day; then and there to receive and deliberate on such Communications as shall be made to...
I have received your letter of the 23d current, accompanied with a report of the committee, on the subject of Gun Boats, in which you desire my opinion of their utility, that part of the message of the President of the United States, which relates to the defence of the sea port towns and harbours. I am now, as I ever have been of opinion, that a great commercial marine, such as the merchants...
I have just received from your office a letter covering a copy of one dated the 10th instant from the French Minister, relative to the claims of the owners of the vessels detained by the Ship of War L’Eole; by which they are referred to the French Consul at Baltimore to obtain the adjustment of those claims. Having no documents in my possession, I must request you to send me those which were...
Mr. Pickering is requested by Major Burnham to present the inclosed bill to Mr. Jefferson, for the Corn-Sheller , and to receive the amount: For that purpose, Mr. P. has signed the receipt. —Mr. P. is informed by Major Burnham that he has sent a letter of advice to Mr. Jefferson. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Pickering presents his compliments to Mr. Jefferson, and thanks him for the ear of Osage corn. On chewing two or three kernels, Mr. Pickering finds the corn of precisely the same texture, and nearly insipid taste, with what in Pennsylvania is called flour-corn ; only the latter grows into a much larger ear than the present sample of Osage corn; but the latter may perhaps ripen earlier. If...
Accustomed to act as a sense of duty urges; as most would think, with too little regard to personal consequences: particularly, having sometimes expressed my sentiments to public and to private men, on subjects of public moment, or of their individual interest, at the hazard of giving them offence: and impelled by the dangers of a measure of great national concern , the interdiction of all...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments & thanks to mr Pickering for the accomodation offered of his copy of Knight’s book. the bill which he had recieved from the gentleman who was to procure him a copy had expressly stated it was not to be bought in London; and this was all Th:J. knew of the matter when he had the pleasure of seeing mr Pickering: but this morning the gentleman called on Th:J....
Mr. Pickering begs leave to inform Mr. Jefferson, that on returning yesterday to his lodgings, he was told by Mr. Davenport, who had enquired for it, that Knight’s treatise on the culture of the apple & pear was not to be purchased in the city of New-York. If therefore Mr. Jefferson wishes either to read it again, or to recommend the printing of an American edition, Mr. Pickering will, with...
Agreeably to the conversation of last Saturday, Colo. Pickering presents for Mr. Jefferson’s perusal, Knight’s treatise on the culture of the Apple & Pear, and on the making of Cider & Perry; persuaded that he will derive some useful information from his facts and practical details, and much pleasure from his ingenious theories. The interesting fact (however to be accounted for) that the old...