You
have
selected

  • Recipient

    • Pickering, Timothy
  • Correspondent

    • Pickering, Timothy

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 24

Period

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Recipient="Pickering, Timothy" AND Correspondent="Pickering, Timothy"
Results 1-30 of 516 sorted by date (descending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Yours of the 4th. inst: inclosing a continuation of your printed letters on the improvement of our native breed of Neat Cattle has been duly received. The subject well merits the attention bestowed on it; and I shall cheerfully comply with the request to put the past & the ensuing nos. into the hands of a Gentleman to whom I doubt not they will be acceptable, & whose judgment & public spirit...
I have recd. Sir, your letter of the 7th. instant, inclosing Nos. 5 & 6. of the New England Farmer. I have not now the title which you supposed, to this mark of attention. Finding that I could not attend the Meetings of the Agricultural Society of Albemarle, held at a considerable distance from me, I made way, by resignation, for a successor to the presiding office who might do more justice to...
Your favour of the 2d instant has prescribed a dismal plan, which I was never very well calculated to execute, but am now wholly incapable. I can write nothing which will not be suspected of personal vanity, local prejudice or Provincial & State partiality. However, as I hold myself responsible, at this age, to one only tribunal in the Universe, I will give you a few hints at all hazards. As...
I have recieved, Sir, your favor of the 12 th and I assure you I recieved it with pleasure. it is true as you say that we have differed in political opinions; but I can say with equal truth, that I never suffered a political to become a personal difference. I have been left on this ground by some friends whom I dearly loved, but I was never the first to separate. with some others, of politics...
The President of the United States to Timothy Pickering, Senator for the State of Massachusetts. Certain matters touching the Public good requiring that the Senate shall be convened on Saturday, the 4th day of March next, You are desired to attend at the Senate Chamber in the City of Washington on that day; then and there to receive and deliberate on such Communications as shall be made to...
I have received your letter of the 23d current, accompanied with a report of the committee, on the subject of Gun Boats, in which you desire my opinion of their utility, that part of the message of the President of the United States, which relates to the defence of the sea port towns and harbours. I am now, as I ever have been of opinion, that a great commercial marine, such as the merchants...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments & thanks to mr Pickering for the accomodation offered of his copy of Knight’s book. the bill which he had recieved from the gentleman who was to procure him a copy had expressly stated it was not to be bought in London; and this was all Th:J. knew of the matter when he had the pleasure of seeing mr Pickering: but this morning the gentleman called on Th:J....
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to the honble mr Pickering and returns him the paper on the subject of boundary with thanks for the communication. he acknoleges the ingenuity of the views it presents, but thinks they can be combated on very solid ground, and that it is our duty to meet them. he thinks it impossible that an express stipulation that we shall go to the N. Western point of...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering and sends him an office copy of Crozat’s grant, prepared to be sent by mr Bearing, of which he will therefore ask the return. RC ( MHi : Pickering Papers). Not recorded in SJL . Enclosure: copy of 1714 charter to Antoine Crozat (see TJ to Pickering, 15 Jan. ).
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering and will send him tomorrow Louis XIVth.’s charter to Crozat , the book having been sent to the Secy. of state’s office to have copies of the charter made out, and the office being closed till tomorrow. he will thank mr Pickering for the return of the paper sent him, when perused, as it was a rough draught & no copy retained, and these...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering and returns him Hutchins’s book with thanks for the use of it. that on Louisiana he had never before seen or heard of, and it has furnished him the first particular information of the line agreed on by the Commrs. under the treaty of Utrecht , he has ever been able to obtain. he had, the last summer, while among his books at Monticello,...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering, and has searched without success in Hutchins’s Topographical Description of the Western country for the passage relative to the Northern boundary of which mr Pickering spoke to him yesterday. he imagines therefore he mistook the pamphlet to which he referred, and therefore asks the favor of the loan of it. RC ( MH ); addressed: “The...
I will make no apology for my delay in answering your inquiry some time since made, because I could offer none which would satisfy myself. I pray you only to believe that it proceeded from any thing rather than want of respect or regard. I shall now comply with your request. The highest toned propositions, which I made in the Convention, were for a President, Senate and Judges during good...
You no doubt have seen my pamphlet respecting the conduct and character of President Adams. The press teems with replies, and I may finally think it expedient to publish a second time. In this case I shall reinforce my charges by new anecdotes. My friends will no doubt be disposed to aid me. You probably possess some which are unknown to me. Pray let me have them without delay. You will...
I perceive that you as well as McHenry are quitting the Administration. I am not informed how all this has been, though I conjecture. Allow me to suggest, that you ought to take with you copies and extracts of all such documents as will enable you to explain both Jefferson & Adams . You are aware of a very curious journal of the latter when he was in Europe, a tissue of weakness and vanity....
Diverse Causes and considerations essential to the Administration of the Government, in my Judgment requiring a Change in the Department of State you are hereby discharged from any further Service as Secretary of State. MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
As I perceive a necessity of introducing a change in the Administration of the office of State, I think it proper to make this communication of it to the present Secretary of State that he may have an opportunity of resigning, if he chooses. I should wish the day on which his resignation is to take place to be named by himself. I wish for an Answer to this Letter on or before Monday Morning...
The President of the United States requests the attention of the Secretary of State and all the heads of Department to the report of the Secretary of the Navy on ship yards & dock yards & their opinions & advice concerning it, as it is necessary a decision should be soon made MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I send you the paragraph of a News Paper just published. I hope it is an Electioneering lie—but as it is likely to do mischief I will thank you by return of Post to inform me whether you have any thing to confirm or refute & particularly whether you have heared of the list with which Commodore Truxton’s name is connected. Yrs. truly ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. The enclosure...
The President of the United States proposes to the Consideration of the heads of Departments a Subject which although at first view it may appear of inconsiderable Moment, will upon more mature reflection be found to be of some difficulty but of great importance to the honor Dignity and Consistency of the Government. In every Government of Europe I believe there is a Gazette in the Service of...
I have considered Mr. Harrisons letter to you of the 10th. & in consequence of his opinion & the intimation of the judges, you may prepare a pardon for William Durelle, for all the sentence, except what relates to the security for future good behavior. I wish however that I had more information of the nature of the libell. You will please to write Mr. Harrison & inform him, that I leave...
The President desires the Secretary of State to send him as soon as possible a number of sea letters and Mediteranean passes for signature, sufficient for the years consumption that this cumbrous business may be out of the way. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The bearer of this, Mr. DuPont, formerly Consul at Charles Town, is personally known to you. He comes with the rest of his family to establish themselves in the United States. They are desirous of being favourably viewed by our Government and my intervention for this purpose has been requested. Inclosed is a letter from General Pinckney which speaks for itself. All that has come to my...
In answer to your letter of yesterday I take this———early opportunity to inform you, that the determination of the President, is not at present to remove Mr. Pintard from his consulship at Madeira. I return you to be filed in your office, the respectable recommendations of Mr. Lamer & have the honor to be Sir / your most obedient MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The Attorney General has left with me and I now Send to you a Project of an explanatory Article or Treaty and a Project of a Letter to Mr King, defining an Ultimatum. There is no Business before the Government at this time of more importance than this and I pray you to turn, your Attention to it, and prepare a Draught of a Letter to Mr King, to be considered if possible on Monday Evening at...
The President requests the Secretary of State to send him a copy of Mr. Patric Henry’s letter in which he declines his appointment, to be laid before congress with the other papers relative to the mission to France. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course; and the manner in which you proposed to dispose of my letter to Mr Murray, was perfectly agreeable to me. Knowing nothing of the writer of the enclosed letter, and unwilling to be hasty in encouraging proposals of this sort, without some information of the characters who are engaged in the Work; I take the liberty of enquiring, through...
I think it will be expedient to lay before congress, on the second day of the session, all the papers which relate to the embassy to France, that they may be printed together, & the public enabled to judge from correct and authentic documents. To this end I request you to order copies to be made of your letter to Mr. Murray & his answer, of his letter to Talleyrand & his answer which should be...
I have just now, recd. your favour of the 6th. I am glad Mr. Winchester has accepted his Commission. I return your Sons Extract from Liancourts Travels. Who could have put into his head, falsehoods so absurd and so gross? It could not be Simcoe. Absurd as he often was he could not have been guilty of this folly which is almost too palpable for our own Jacobinical Prints. Why have We no Copy of...
I am this moment favored with yours of this date, & thank you for the information it contains. It was proper to publish the news in Mr. Humphry’s letter. I return you Mr. Kings, as well as his. The assurances you propose to convey through Mr. King to the court of Denmark, that their consul will be cordially received are very agreeable to me.—I hope to meet you in Philadelphia on the course of...