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    • Pickering, Timothy

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You will recollect that Gibbon, in his history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, treats of the Christian Religion; and thus he assigns five secondary causes of its prevalence, & final victory over the established religions of the earth. Among these, one was “the miraculous powers ascribed to the primitive church.” It seems plain that Gibbon considered the miracles ascribed to Christ...
Mr. Pickering is requested by Major Burnham to present the inclosed bill to Mr. Jefferson, for the Corn-Sheller , and to receive the amount: For that purpose, Mr. P. has signed the receipt. —Mr. P. is informed by Major Burnham that he has sent a letter of advice to Mr. Jefferson. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Pickering presents his compliments to Mr. Jefferson, and thanks him for the ear of Osage corn. On chewing two or three kernels, Mr. Pickering finds the corn of precisely the same texture, and nearly insipid taste, with what in Pennsylvania is called flour-corn ; only the latter grows into a much larger ear than the present sample of Osage corn; but the latter may perhaps ripen earlier. If...
Accustomed to act as a sense of duty urges; as most would think, with too little regard to personal consequences: particularly, having sometimes expressed my sentiments to public and to private men, on subjects of public moment, or of their individual interest, at the hazard of giving them offence: and impelled by the dangers of a measure of great national concern , the interdiction of all...
Mr. Pickering begs leave to inform Mr. Jefferson, that on returning yesterday to his lodgings, he was told by Mr. Davenport, who had enquired for it, that Knight’s treatise on the culture of the apple & pear was not to be purchased in the city of New-York. If therefore Mr. Jefferson wishes either to read it again, or to recommend the printing of an American edition, Mr. Pickering will, with...
Agreeably to the conversation of last Saturday, Colo. Pickering presents for Mr. Jefferson’s perusal, Knight’s treatise on the culture of the Apple & Pear, and on the making of Cider & Perry; persuaded that he will derive some useful information from his facts and practical details, and much pleasure from his ingenious theories. The interesting fact (however to be accounted for) that the old...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President, and returns the copy of Crozat’s grant from Louis XIV. with his thanks. The grant is not what Mr. P. supposed, of the province of Louisiana, but a monopoly of its commerce , for 15 years; with some specific property therein, the value of which, and its tenure, were to depend on his labour and expence in cultivation and improvement. But in...
Mr. Pickering has the honour to return to the President his memoir on the northern boundary of Louisiana. A close examination of the subject since, has convinced Mr. Pickering that the idea he took the liberty to suggest to the President, which is the basis of the memoir, and which arose in Mr. Pickering’s mind on the perusal of Mr. Hutchins’s observations on the treaty of Utrecht, is...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President of the United States, and submits to his consideration the inclosed inquiry concerning the Northern boundaries of Canada & Louisiana. If Mr. Pickering does not extremely mistake the facts, and their necessary consequences, all dispute with Great-Britain concerning boundaries, will be forever closed, by a ratification and execution of the...
An inquiry concerning the Northern Boundaries of Canada & Louisiana  By the tenth article of the treaty of Utrecht, (in 1713) Great Britain and France agreed as follows  France shall restore to Great Britain “the bay and streights of Hudson, together with all lands, seas, sea coasts, rivers and places situate in the said bay and streights, and which belong thereunto, no tracts of land or of...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President, and requests the loan of Crozat’s grant of Louisiana from Lewis XIV. Mr. P. acknowledges the receipt of the President’s observations on the northern boundaries of the U. States & Louisiana; and if any further examination of the subject should present a different view of it, to Mr. Pickering, he will take the liberty to offer the same to the...
Since I had the honor of seeing you, I have conversed with the Secretary of the Treasury, from whom I learn that the suit against Mr. Randolph is still pending—that he claims a credit for the nine thousand dollars which Mr. Short desired him to lay out in the purchase of public Stock, saying it was a private transaction; and that as the issue depends on the judgement of the court, it will be...
Since sending you this morning a concise statement of Mr. Short’s claim for nine thousand dollars , as it appeared from the books in my office , I have received from the Secretary of the Treasury the following memorandum: “Mr. Jefferson has had a conversation with Mr. Harrison, Auditor, in which it was understood that Mr. Randolph had applied Two thousand pounds for Mr. Short’s use, for which...
I have the honor to inclose a copy of the President’s proclamation for convening the Congress of the United States at this city on the 15th of next May; and to be with great respect your most obt. servant RC ( NNPM ); at foot of text: “The Vice-President of the United States.” FC ( Lb in DNA : RG 59, DL ). Recorded in SJL as received 8 Apr. 1797. Enclosure: Proclamation by President Adams...
On the 11th. instant I delivered the inclosed packet to Mr. Bloodworth, son of the Senator from North-Carolina, to deliver to you with his own hand. To-day it was returned to me by the father with the inclosed note. I also wrote you by the mail which left Philadelphia last monday, to communicate the copy of the certificate of your election to the office of vice-President of the United States,...
I have the honor to inform you, that pursuant to the request of the Senate communicated to him yesterday, the President of the United States has directed me to transmit to you the inclosed certificate, under the hand and seal of the present Vice-President, of your being elected, agreeably to the Constitution, Vice-President of the United States of America. The bearer, Mr. Bloodworth, son of...
I have this day committed to Mr. Samuel Bloodworth, son of the Senator from North-Carolina, the original certificate of the President of the Senate, of your being elected Vice-President of the United States, which he is specially charged to deliver to you in person. But for the greater certainty of your receiving this notice, I have thought it expedient to convey to you a copy of the...
Mr. Miller, the postmaster at Charlottesville, has signified his desire to resign his office; and waits only for the appointment of a Successor. Permit me to ask the favour of you to name a Suitable person, and who will accept the Office. Altho’ the Commission of 20 per Cent may not be a motive with any one, perhaps the privilege of franking his own letters, not exceeding half an ounce in...
If there be any spare copies of the Census of the Inhabitants of the UStates in the office of the Secretary of State, the postmaster General requests Mr. Jefferson to favour him with one: it being proper to attend to the population of the country in forming an opinion upon applications for new post-roads. RC ( DNA : RG 59, MLR ); endorsed by TJ as received [26] Dec. 1793 and so recorded in SJL .
To remove objections at the auditors office to the settlement of my demand for the repayment of the money paid S. Bradshaw who went express to Kentuckey for the return of the election there of President and Vice-President—be pleased to favour me with a certificate that I employed and paid him at your request. I am respectfully sir Your most obedt. servt. RC ( DLC ); at foot of text: “The...
I am honoured with your letter of yesterday’s date, respecting the delinquency of the post rider between Richmond and Charlottesville. Mr. Davis had some time ago informed me of his irregularities and defects: but soon afterwards wrote me that it appeared he had been so poor as to be unable to provide suitable horses: tho’ he had then accomplished it; and expected such assistance as would...
Mr: Bradshaw has just returned with an Answer to your letter to the Judge of the district Court of Kentucky. He says he arrived at Lexington, on the 27th: of January. Mr: Innes being from home, Bradshaw was detained until the 8th: of February; and then waited three days for company through the wilderness. The bearer Mr: Bradley will present to you the receipt for the fifty dollars which I...
I have received your note of this date . It will certainly be most eligible for the Messenger destined to Georgia to take a passage from New-York in a vessel bound to Savannah or Charleston—perhaps preferably to Charleston, where on his arrival he can find a vessel destined to return to New York by the time he can go to Augusta and get back to Charleston—the trade of Charleston requiring so...
As I shall leave town before the papers relative to an intended sale in France of Virginia lands, will be ready to be executed, I have committed the conduct of the business, so far as it respects myself, to my friend Mr. Samuel Hodgdon. He will wait on you with the papers, when completed, to receive such certificate as you shall think proper to give relative to him, Mr. Levi Hollingsworth, and...
I was last week honoured with your letter of the 9th instant, inclosing a letter from the governour of Massachusetts relative to the hire of the ox-teams raised in that state, to serve with the army in the year 1781; and requesting me to give all the information in my power, respecting the nature and circumstances of the contract mentioned in the letter, and relative to the subject thereof in...
I am this moment honoured with your Excellency’s letter of the 15th ulto. informing of the appointment of Major Claiborne to be deputy quarter master for the state of Virginia. This was unexpected, and I fear may produce some difficulty. In consequence of your Excellency’s letter of November 21st, informing me of your having written to Major Forsythe, offering him the place of DQM for...
Newburgh [ N.Y. ] , 15 Dec. 1780. Acknowledges a letter in which TJ stated his intention of appointing Maj. [Robert] Forsyth deputy quartermaster for Virginia. Forsyth had already requested this appointment and he is very acceptable to Pickering. RC ( PHi ); 2 p.; signed: “Tim: Pickering Q.M.G.”; addressed and endorsed. FC , in Pickering’s hand ( DNA : RG 93). TJ’s letter acknowledged by...
I was honoured with your letter relative to a deputy quarter master for the State of Virginia, and from the information it contained expected Colo. Finnies arrival in Philadelphia before I left it; but I have not seen or heard from him, And as I was so soon going to the Army I suspended my answer till I should have an opportunity of enquiring of the Gentlemen from your State if they could...
Philadelphia, 21 Aug. 1780 . Having been appointed by Congress to “an important and at this time a most difficult and ungratefull office,” that of quartermaster general, Pickering is obliged to request the governor and Council of Virginia to appoint a deputy quartermaster general for Virginia. Has consulted the Virginia delegates in Congress and requested them to recommend a proper person, but...
We did ourselves the honour of writing to your Excellency on the 20th ulto. when we expected to be able to send you 2000 cartridge boxes: but we have been disappointed; and Major Peirce has received at present but between six and seven hundred: nor, are we certain how soon the rest can be furnished. But as the whole number will be incompetent to the demands of your state, we beg leave to...