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    • Pickering, Timothy

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Documents filtered by: Period="Jefferson Presidency" AND Correspondent="Pickering, Timothy"
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When in Philadelphia, last winter, Mr. James Yard of that city, reminded me of an assurance given to Edward Stevens Esqr. Consul General for St. Domingo, that he should be indemnified for becoming bail for Mr. Bunel, the Agent of General Toussaint . The facts were these. After General Toussaint took upon himself the administration of the Government of St. Domingo, being desirous of renewing...
Mr Joseph Dennie, now of Philadelphia, has more than once observed to me, that he had never the happiness of being known to you. He repeated the observation, as I lately passed thro’ that city. And manifesting an earnest desire to be introduced, requested me to write to you for that purpose. Of Mr Dennie’s genius and literary talents, you will judge from his writings. These have appeared...
13 June 1801, Easton, Pennsylvania. Forwards a packet of papers pertaining to the claims of the heirs of a French officer who served in the Revolution, Jean-Baptiste de Gouvion. Money is due them from the U.S., but he has advised the heirs not to permit the funds to go to a French government official; Pickering’s recollection is that he suggested the remittance be made through bankers in...
The assertion of the Jacobins, that you are an aristocrat & a Monarchist, is not new: But at a late meeting of the sect in this town, one of their leaders declared “That General Hamilton proposed (&, it was understood, advocated) in the general Convention, That the President of the United States, and the Senators, should be chosen for life: That this was intended as an introduction to...
I will make no apology for my delay in answering your inquiry some time since made, because I could offer none which would satisfy myself. I pray you only to believe that it proceeded from any thing rather than want of respect or regard. I shall now comply with your request. The highest toned propositions, which I made in the Convention, were for a President, Senate and Judges during good...
I hoped to have seen you on my way hither; but the distance at which you were from the place of crossing the Hudson, & my engagements with my travelling companions, prevented. I duly received your letter of Septr. 16th. relative to the proposition you made in the General Convention. It was obvious, that those, with the propositions of others, were presented for consideration and discussion, to...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering, and has searched without success in Hutchins’s Topographical Description of the Western country for the passage relative to the Northern boundary of which mr Pickering spoke to him yesterday. he imagines therefore he mistook the pamphlet to which he referred, and therefore asks the favor of the loan of it. RC ( MH ); addressed: “The...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering and returns him Hutchins’s book with thanks for the use of it. that on Louisiana he had never before seen or heard of, and it has furnished him the first particular information of the line agreed on by the Commrs. under the treaty of Utrecht , he has ever been able to obtain. he had, the last summer, while among his books at Monticello,...
Mr. Pickering presents his respects to the President, and requests the loan of Crozat’s grant of Louisiana from Lewis XIV. Mr. P. acknowledges the receipt of the President’s observations on the northern boundaries of the U. States & Louisiana; and if any further examination of the subject should present a different view of it, to Mr. Pickering, he will take the liberty to offer the same to the...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to mr Pickering and will send him tomorrow Louis XIVth.’s charter to Crozat , the book having been sent to the Secy. of state’s office to have copies of the charter made out, and the office being closed till tomorrow. he will thank mr Pickering for the return of the paper sent him, when perused, as it was a rough draught & no copy retained, and these...