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After an absence of four months in the Woods I returned hither on the evening of the 10th instant; and this is the first opportunity of acknowledging the receipt of your letter of the 13th ult. A few days before I left the Woods , I received from a friend in Philadelphia, your pamphlet concerning the conduct and character of President Adams. You say the press teams with replies. I have yet...
You no doubt have seen my pamphlet respecting the conduct and character of President Adams. The press teems with replies, and I may finally think it expedient to publish a second time. In this case I shall reinforce my charges by new anecdotes. My friends will no doubt be disposed to aid me. You probably possess some which are unknown to me. Pray let me have them without delay. You will...
I have at this instant received your letter without date, but stamped at the postoffice in NYork May 14. I intended to have done precisely what you suggest, respecting Mr Adams journal &c. (very little of which I had ever read) but there was not time. Last saturday morning I received a summons to resign , and a desire that I would myself name the day. But I did not incline to accept this...
I perceive that you as well as McHenry are quitting the Administration. I am not informed how all this has been, though I conjecture. Allow me to suggest, that you ought to take with you copies and extracts of all such documents as will enable you to explain both Jefferson & Adams . You are aware of a very curious journal of the latter when he was in Europe, a tissue of weakness and vanity....
Diverse Causes and considerations essential to the Administration of the Government, in my Judgment requiring a Change in the Department of State you are hereby discharged from any further Service as Secretary of State. MHi : Timothy Pickering Papers.
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States, letters and voluminous documents relative to calumnies formed and propagated in St. Domingo, chiefly by Jacob Mayer, the American Consul at Cape Francois, against Doctor Edward Stevens the Consul General; connected with which are said Mayer’s base insinuations and open slanders against the President of the...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter dated last Saturday, stating that “as you perceive a necessity of introducing a change in the administration of the Office of State, you think it proper to make this communication of it to the present Secretary of State, that he may have an opportunity of resigning, if he chooses:” and that “you would wish the day on which his resignation is to...
The inclosed letter dated February 26. 1800, from Jacob Mayer, Consul of the United States at Cape Francais, should have accompanied the Secretary of State’s report made to the President this morning, relative to the Consul General, Doctor Stevens, and the Consul Mayer. The Secretary stated that he had not received from the Consul Mayer an answer to his (the Secretary’s) letter of the 18th of...
As I perceive a necessity of introducing a change in the Administration of the office of State, I think it proper to make this communication of it to the present Secretary of State that he may have an opportunity of resigning, if he chooses. I should wish the day on which his resignation is to take place to be named by himself. I wish for an Answer to this Letter on or before Monday Morning...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States a letter from Wm. H Harrison Esqr. represented in Congress, from the N. Western Territory, such persons as have occurred to him as best qualified for the appointments of General Officers for that Territory. as Mr. Harrison is himself a Candidate for the office of Major General of the Hamilton Division of...
We have considered the question of renewing the commercial intercourse of the United States with the ports and places in the island of Hispaniola, from Montechristi, on the north, round by the east end thereof, as far as Jacmel, on the south, inclusively; and respectfully submit, to the President of the United States, our opinion, That it is expedient, and for the interest of the United...
The Secretary of State has the honor to inclose Mr. Rawles’ resignation of the office of Attorney of the United States for the district of Pennsylvania . MHi : Adams Papers.
The President of the United States requests the attention of the Secretary of State and all the heads of Department to the report of the Secretary of the Navy on ship yards & dock yards & their opinions & advice concerning it, as it is necessary a decision should be soon made MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
I send you the paragraph of a News Paper just published. I hope it is an Electioneering lie—but as it is likely to do mischief I will thank you by return of Post to inform me whether you have any thing to confirm or refute & particularly whether you have heared of the list with which Commodore Truxton’s name is connected. Yrs. truly ALS , Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston. The enclosure...
[ Philadelphia, April 25, 1800. Pickering’s endorsement on Hamilton’s letter to him dated April 24–25, 1800 , reads: “answd. 25th.” Letter not found. ]
The President of the United States proposes to the Consideration of the heads of Departments a Subject which although at first view it may appear of inconsiderable Moment, will upon more mature reflection be found to be of some difficulty but of great importance to the honor Dignity and Consistency of the Government. In every Government of Europe I believe there is a Gazette in the Service of...
I have considered Mr. Harrisons letter to you of the 10th. & in consequence of his opinion & the intimation of the judges, you may prepare a pardon for William Durelle, for all the sentence, except what relates to the security for future good behavior. I wish however that I had more information of the nature of the libell. You will please to write Mr. Harrison & inform him, that I leave...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President sundry recommendations of Joseph Forman of Baltimore to be appointed a Consul in France. Mr. Lloyd, Senator from Maryland, knowing that the Consulate of Rotterdam is vacant, by the death of John Baeldemaker, informs that that place would be accepted my Mr. Forman, and solicited that the nomination might be made. MHi : Adams Papers.
On the petition of David Steward & other respectable citizens of Baltimore, praying the President to order a nolle presequi in the case of Captain Levin Jones, late master of the American Brigantine called the David Stewart, who has been indicted for the crime of murder committed, as alledged on the body of William Davis one of his crew, on the high seas. The Secretary of State, in obedience...
We have had the honour in obedience to your commands maturely to consider the papers and subject referred to us in your letter dated 29 January Ultimo, and the law of Tennessee passed the 26. October 1799 and a letter from the Governor of the said State to William Cocke and Joseph Anderson Senators and William Charles Cole Claiborne Representative of the State of Tennessee in the Congress of...
The President desires the Secretary of State to send him as soon as possible a number of sea letters and Mediteranean passes for signature, sufficient for the years consumption that this cumbrous business may be out of the way. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
The bearer of this, Mr. DuPont, formerly Consul at Charles Town, is personally known to you. He comes with the rest of his family to establish themselves in the United States. They are desirous of being favourably viewed by our Government and my intervention for this purpose has been requested. Inclosed is a letter from General Pinckney which speaks for itself. All that has come to my...
The Secretary has the honor to lay before the President 1. Mr. Liston’s note of Feby. 2. 1800 with papers referred to relative to the rescue of three American Vessels from the hands of the British captors, and for the restoration of which he is instructed by his government to apply. 2. Mr. Liston’s note of the 4th of February, together with his project of a treaty for the reciprocal delivery...
The Secretary of State has the honour to lay before the President the petition of Robert Fisher of Harford County, Maryland, committed to gaol in Baltimore for theft committed in the Island of Cuba , praying a Nolle prosequi may be entered. Governor Howard has just been here with the father of the young man who anxiously waits your decision. On the enquiries of the Secretary, two letters were...
The Secretary of State begs leave to inform the President of the United States, that the Georgia Commissioners are desirous of meeting those appointed by the United States, without delay, on the subject of the claims of Territory. As Mr. Sitgreaves is gone for London, the Secretary respectfully proposes that another Commissioner should be appointed in his place; and submits whether it would...
The Secretary of State has prepared, as directed, and now respectfully submits to the President of the United States, copies of the papers, which probably were contemplated by the House of Representatives, in their resolve of the 4th. instant: Altho’ no requisition, as the resolve supposes, has ever been received, nor any communication made to the Judge of the District Court of South Carolina,...
In answer to your letter of yesterday I take this———early opportunity to inform you, that the determination of the President, is not at present to remove Mr. Pintard from his consulship at Madeira. I return you to be filed in your office, the respectable recommendations of Mr. Lamer & have the honor to be Sir / your most obedient MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Not knowing the President’s determination respecting the Consulate of Madeira, the Secretary of State respectfully lays before the President a letter of the 24th instant, just received, from some respectable citizens, recommending Mr. Marien Lamar for Consul in that island. Mr. Lamar is the nephew of the late Henry Hill Esqr. of Philadelphia, & has resided some time at Madeira, in Mr. Hill’s...
I have the honor to lay before you the letters I have prepared for Tunis and Tripoli. With the latter every thing appears to be adjusted. The Bey of Tunis demands a present of Jewels, the amount about 40,000 dollars. In his letter to you he persists in the demand. Upon a second reading and deliberate examination of Mr. Eaton’s communications, the present appears to me indispensable: our peace...
The Secretary of State has the honor to lay before the President of the United States a statement of the claims of American Citizens adjusted by the board of Commissioners under the 21st. article of our treaty with Spain; and a letter from Matthew Clarkson Esquire, the commissioner on the part of the United States, dated the 2d. instant, informing that the commission terminated on the 31st. of...
The Secretary of State respectfully proposes to the President of the United States, that there be allowed to Samuel Sitgreaves, going to London on the business of the sixth article of the treaty, of amity &c. with Great Britain, A continuation of his salary as one of the Commissioners under that article; And the expences which shall be necessarily incurred for his voyage to and from London,...
The Secretary of State has the honour to inform the President, that he received Mr. Pintard’s papers here inclosed, from Mr. Wolcott—read & handed them to Mr. McHenry—& has this moment received them back from Mr. Stoddert. It appears that Mr. Pintard himself first gave them to Mr Lee. The Secretary of State sees no remark upon them from any of the gentlemen; nor has he any to make himself. MHi...
Agreeably to your direction the papers which were laid before you respecting John Marsden Pintard Esqr. Consul of the United States for the Island of Madeira, including his own communications to you, have been committed to the Heads of Departments and Attorney General for their examination and consideration: and their opinions thereon I presume will be submitted to you immediately: by own I...
The Attorney General has left with me and I now Send to you a Project of an explanatory Article or Treaty and a Project of a Letter to Mr King, defining an Ultimatum. There is no Business before the Government at this time of more importance than this and I pray you to turn, your Attention to it, and prepare a Draught of a Letter to Mr King, to be considered if possible on Monday Evening at...
The President requests the Secretary of State to send him a copy of Mr. Patric Henry’s letter in which he declines his appointment, to be laid before congress with the other papers relative to the mission to France. MHi : Adams Family Papers, Letterbooks.
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 3 Dec. 1799. GW’s letter of 24 Nov. to Pickering is docketed by Pickering, “answd Decr 3d.”
Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course; and the manner in which you proposed to dispose of my letter to Mr Murray, was perfectly agreeable to me. Knowing nothing of the writer of the enclosed letter, and unwilling to be hasty in encouraging proposals of this sort, without some information of the characters who are engaged in the Work; I take the liberty of enquiring, through...
Agreeably to the President’s direction, the Secretary of State respectfully offers the following notices of matters appearing to him proper to be communicated to Congress, at the opening of their approaching session. “It appearing probable; from the information I had received, that our commercial intercourse with some ports of the Island of St. Domingo might safely be renewed: Conformably to...
I think it will be expedient to lay before congress, on the second day of the session, all the papers which relate to the embassy to France, that they may be printed together, & the public enabled to judge from correct and authentic documents. To this end I request you to order copies to be made of your letter to Mr. Murray & his answer, of his letter to Talleyrand & his answer which should be...
I have just now, recd. your favour of the 6th. I am glad Mr. Winchester has accepted his Commission. I return your Sons Extract from Liancourts Travels. Who could have put into his head, falsehoods so absurd and so gross? It could not be Simcoe. Absurd as he often was he could not have been guilty of this folly which is almost too palpable for our own Jacobinical Prints. Why have We no Copy of...
I received your letter of last evening; & have written to Mr. King on the subject of a Danish Consul—The letter to go by the British packet, which will not sail till next Saturday. To-day I received a letter from Mr. Winchester, acknowledging the receipt of your commission, constituting him Judge of the Maryland District. He concludes—“Be pleased, sir, to communicate to the President my...
I am this moment favored with yours of this date, & thank you for the information it contains. It was proper to publish the news in Mr. Humphry’s letter. I return you Mr. Kings, as well as his. The assurances you propose to convey through Mr. King to the court of Denmark, that their consul will be cordially received are very agreeable to me.—I hope to meet you in Philadelphia on the course of...
By the inclosed letter of July 30 from Mr. King, it seems that the King of Denmark intends to name a Consul to reside in the United States; but desires first to know whether it will be agreeable to the American Government. With your permission I will communicate to Mr. King the requested assurance that such an appointment will meet your approbation. The inclosed letter of Sept. 6th from...
Letter not found: from Timothy Pickering, 5 Nov. 1799. GW wrote Pickering on 24 Nov. : “Your favour of the 5th instant came to hand in due course.”
Your private & confidential letter of the 24th Ulto came duly, and safely to hand. Its contents, I confess, surprised me. But as men will view the same things in different lights, I would now , fain hope that the P——has caught the true one; and, that good will come from the Mission, which is about to depart. These are my wishes, and no one is more ardent in them; but I see nothing in the...
The Secretary of State presents to the President the inclosed letters received last evening from Morristown, announcing the dissolution of the Circuit Court—with the reasons stated by the Judges. MHi : Adams Papers.
(Private) (& Confidential) Sir, Trenton [N.J.] Oct. 24. 1799 I am this evening honoured with your letter of the 20th. When I last wrote you, I had grounds to expect, on the President’s arrival; that the mission to France would be suspended, until the fate of its government should be known. This great question I supposed (& my colleagues had formed the same expectation) would be a subject of...
Private Dear Sir, Mount Vernon Octr 20th 1799 Your letters of the 29th Ult. and 9th instant, have been duly received; and for the information given in them, I feel myself obliged. In a note which I have just recd from Mr Stoddert, to whom I had occasion to write on business, is added in the close thereof “The President has decided that the Mission to France shall proceed without delay. The...
As the Session of Congress draws nigh, I pray you to favour me with your sentiments concerning the Communication necessary to be made to Congress of the State of the Nation, and particularly a concise narration of the Proceedings with St Domingo and the Isle of France. It may be doubtful however whether any thing need be said at present, on the last. A very succinct Account of the Invitation...
I request you to order fair copies of the instructions, as corrected last evening, to be prepared and delivered to Judge Elsworth & Govenor Davie, with another for Mr. Murray without loss of time, & to write a letter to those gentlemen, as Envoys Extraordinary to the French republic, expressing with the affectionate respects of the President, his desire that they would take their passage for...