You
have
selected

  • Period

    • Adams Presidency
  • Correspondent

    • Pickering, Timothy

Author

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 7

Recipient

Sort: Frequency / Alphabetical

Show: Top 10 / Top 11

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Period="Adams Presidency" AND Correspondent="Pickering, Timothy"
Results 1-10 of 478 sorted by date (ascending)
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
The President of the United States requests the Secretary of State to take into his Consideration, the following Questions, and make report of his Opinion in writing. 1. Whether the refusal to receive Mr. Pinckney, and the rude orders to quit Paris, and the Territory of the Republic, with Such circumstances of Indignity, Insult and Hostility, as we have been informed of are Bars to all further...
The pressure of business in the last days of my administration, occasioned my dispatching the enclosed Instrument to the Commissioners of this City without the Seal of the United States (as certified); and I should not have known it wanted this evidence, had not those Gentlemen (upon my arrival here) informed me of the omission. I now forward it for the purpose of having this defect remedied;...
On the 18th I was honoured with your letter of the 14th covering an instrument directing the transfer of the streets and public lots in the City of Washington from Messrs Beall & Gantt to the Commissioners for that city: The seal of the United States has been affixed to it; and by to-morrow’s mail I shall send it to the Commissioners, as you desire. Dr Edwards has handed me the inclosed...
It is now ascertained that Mr Pinckney has been refused and with circumstances of indignity. What is to be done? The share I have had in the public administration added to my interest as a Citizen make me extremely anxious that at this delicate Crisis a course of conduct exactly proper may be adopted. I offer to your consideration without ceremony what appears to me such a course. First. I...
On the 25th I was favoured with your letter of the 22d. The first measure of calling Congress together had been determined on by the President the preceding evening; and I had the draught of the proclamation inclosed, in my hand, to present to him, when I received your letter. Some other of the measures suggested had been contemplated; and all will receive attention from me & my colleagues. I...
I have the honor to inclose a copy of the President’s proclamation for convening the Congress of the United States at this city on the 15th of next May; and to be with great respect your most obt. servant RC ( NNPM ); at foot of text: “The Vice-President of the United States.” FC ( Lb in DNA : RG 59, DL ). Recorded in SJL as received 8 Apr. 1797. Enclosure: Proclamation by President Adams...
The post of yesterday brought me your letter of the day before. I regret that the idea of a Commission extraordinary appears of doubtful propriety. For after very mature reflection I am intirely convinced of its expediency. I do not understand the passage you cite as excluding the reception of a special extraordinary Minister but of an ordinary resident Minister. It seems impossible that the...
I believe I mentioned in my last, that I was going to sketch a state of facts relative to Mr. Pinckney’s mission for publication. I now inclose it. That the facts should be known to our citizens was deemed important. I thought it highly important that the Representatives should come together impressed with the sentiments of their constituents on the reprehensible conduct of the French...
I have received your letter of the 30th. with the statement inclosed. I do not believe that its publication would have any influence upon the question of a rupture with France; but yet, as it seems that those who surround the President are not agreed in the matter—as an opinion is industriously circulated that too much fuel has been added by the publications of the Government—as it is...
I received your letter of the and accord with your opinion that the proposed publication of the intelligence from Genl. Pinckney should be omitted. The “emigrant” we conclude to be Perigord, formerly bishop of Autun. Sometime since, I was informed that he left this country with signs of enmity towards it; and the Directory would naturally place great confidence in his opinion: and yet it is so...