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I duly recd. your letter of the 17th ulto. in answer to mine of the 7th; informing me that you had relinquished the presidency of the Albemarle Agricultural Society, & had other demands on your time, and other reading tasks in which you were in arrears, which abridged your reading works on husbandry. I shall nevertheless continue to address to you my letters in relation to the improving of our...
As you are the President of an Agricultural Society, you doubtless read some Agricultural papers, and among them, the “American Farmer,” a paper peculiarly adapted to the husbandry of the Middle States. In that you will have seen the writings of Mr. John Hare Powel, in three numbers, called a “Reply to Colonel Pickering on Native Cattle.” On that subject I wrote four letters, first published...
I duly received, and am greatly obliged by your interesting letter of the 6th in answer to mine of the 2d inst. Should any other questions occur on of importance enough to authorize me to interrupt your repose, I shall use the liberty you allow me, to propose them. In recurring to the early opposition to British taxation of the Colonies, you some two or three years since mentioned your own...
As no act of the Congress of the Thirteen United American Colonies was so distinguished as that by which their Independence of Great Britain was declared, the most particular history of that transaction will probably be sought for; not merely as an interesting curiosity, but to do substantial justice to the abilities and energy of the leaders in that great measure. By the public journals it...
You will recollect that Gibbon, in his history of the decline and fall of the Roman Empire, treats of the Christian Religion; and thus he assigns five secondary causes of its prevalence, & final victory over the established religions of the earth. Among these, one was “the miraculous powers ascribed to the primitive church.” It seems plain that Gibbon considered the miracles ascribed to Christ...
I have repeatedly applied to the secretary of the navy to obtain the discharge of a minor of the name of Chase, whose father, Aquila Chase, of Massachusetts, demands his release, & has furnished the requisite evidence of his being a minor; but am not informed that the discharge has been directed. The last time I called at the Navy Office, Mr. Jones being absent, his chief clerk promised to...
The two nominations of an associate judge of the supreme court to fill the seat vacated by the death of Judge Cushing, having failed; will you permit me to bring to your recollection a man whom you knew in the House of Representatives, in Philadelphia—Jeremiah Smith of New Hampshire? He is a federalist; but one of great distinction as a lawyer; at the same time, amiable, moderate &...
I have just received from your office a letter covering a copy of one dated the 10th instant from the French Minister, relative to the claims of the owners of the vessels detained by the Ship of War L’Eole; by which they are referred to the French Consul at Baltimore to obtain the adjustment of those claims. Having no documents in my possession, I must request you to send me those which were...
Mr. Pickering is requested by Major Burnham to present the inclosed bill to Mr. Jefferson, for the Corn-Sheller , and to receive the amount: For that purpose, Mr. P. has signed the receipt. —Mr. P. is informed by Major Burnham that he has sent a letter of advice to Mr. Jefferson. MHi : Coolidge Collection.
Mr. Pickering presents his compliments to Mr. Jefferson, and thanks him for the ear of Osage corn. On chewing two or three kernels, Mr. Pickering finds the corn of precisely the same texture, and nearly insipid taste, with what in Pennsylvania is called flour-corn ; only the latter grows into a much larger ear than the present sample of Osage corn; but the latter may perhaps ripen earlier. If...