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It appears by an endorsement of M r Jefferson on the assumpsit of Ed: Pendleton & Peter Lyons, that the following sums were rec d by him on acct of W m Short. viz: Nov. 21 st 1798. £500 Dec 3. 300. 1799. Jan: 14. 400. It appears from the books of Gibson & Jefferson in the hand writing of Geo: Jefferson dec d that in nov. 1800 M
29 November 1810, Richmond. Reports the death “some time today” of Joseph Scott, U.S. marshal for Virginia, and offers himself for the post. Will not discuss his pretensions to office but refers JM to “our friend” Robert Taylor of Orange. RC ( DNA : RG 59, LAR , 1809–17, filed under “Pendleton”). 1 p. Edmund Pendleton, Jr., was the grandnephew of Judge Edmund Pendleton. His father, Edmund...
The money due from the late William Tompkins for a tract of Land purchased by him of the Trustees of Col o Bernard Moore deceased has all been paid to me as Agent for the Administrators of the Estate of John Robinson Esq r deceased; the particular quantity of Land will be ascertained and described in a Deed to be prepared by Gen l Jn o Minor for your signature as surviving Trustee. RC
I had the honor of addressing a letter to the President not long since recommending to his consideration the appointing of my son Mr. Edmund Pendleton jr. to the first vacant Office attached to the Federal Government in this State, not in the Judiciary department. I can with truth say to you Sir, as I did to Mr. Jefferson, that his qualifications, both mental and moral, fit him for the correct...
Permit me, tho’ at this late hour, to express my happy feelings at the issue of the Election of Chief & second Majestrates, and the consequent changes in the principal Executive Offices, which promise Us a wise, Constitutional, & Eocomical [ sic ] Administration of the Federal Government for at least four years; & I hope much longer, which will be the case, if the Republican Citizens do not...
When I view the date of yr. favor of April 19th., I am ashamed of having so long delayed to acknowledge it’s reciept & comply with your small request. my Answers to your queries are now inclosed, which I fear will be a poor compensation for the delay, or for your trouble in forming the Questions. The truth is that when your letter came to hand, I was engaged in a very disagreable piece of...
In Committee. The paper before a committee, whether select or of the whole, may be either such as originates with themselves, as a draught of an address a bill to be framed Resolutions or a bill referred to them. in every case the bill or other paper is first read by the clerk, & then by the chairman by paragraphs. Scob. 49. pausing at the end of the paragraph, & putting questions for amending...
The bearer hereof mr Alexander Woolcot proposing to go on to Virginia, and from a great respect for your patriarchal & republican character, expressing a great wish to be made known to you, I take the liberty of giving him a line of introduction. he is himself a strong republican, a man of understanding and of good character; which I affirm partly on my own knolege of him, but state more on...
My duties here require me to possess exact knolege of parliamentary proceedings. while a student I read a good deal, & common placed what I read, on this subject. but it is now 20. years since I was a member of a parliamentary body, so that I am grown rusty. so far indeed as books go, my commonplace has enabled me to retrieve. but there are many minute practices, which being in daily use in...
Permit me to introduce to you my friend Mr. John Hoomes jr., son of Mr. Hoomes of the Bowling Green whose respectability you are no stranger to. The young Gentn. (worthy of such a father) is in the Mercantile line and about to go to Europe; and as it is possible that he may be taken & carried to France; Or that he may incline to viset that Countrey before his return, he judges that in either...
Mr. Taylor informed me that you wished to have sent you the several Letters I was favored with whilst you was at Congress, which are accordingly furnished by him. I know I preserved them all, but am not sure I have collected the whole: should I find more, they shall be added. I congratulate my Countrey on your return to our state Counsels in this important crisis. Present my most Affecte....
Your letter of Feb. 24. which was intended to have reached me at Philadelphia, did not arrive there till I had left that place, and then had to follow me to this, which must apologize for the delay in acknoleging it. in the mean time I had seen in our papers the one with your signature , and seen it with great satisfaction. omitting one paragraph of it, I may be permitted to give to the...
My blessings for my Countrey, such as they are, are not, like the old Patriarchs, confined to one, but as numerous as the Stars in the firmament—their inefficacy, and the difficulty of their diffusion, is not so easy to overcome—I set about a 2d. Essay , but a train of interruptions, added to the feeble state of my mental powers, & more feeble motion of my Pen, having no Clerk, delayed my...
Since my last which was of the 14th. a Monsr. Leblanc, agent from Desfourneaux has come to town. he came in the Retaliation, and a letter from Desfourneaux, of which he was the bearer, now inclosed, will correct some circumstances in my statement relative to that vessel which were not very material. it shews at the same time that she was liberated without condition. still it is said , but I...
I wrote you a petition on the 29th. of Jan. I know the extent of this trespass on your tranquility, and how indiscreet it would have been under any other circumstances. but the fate of this country, whether it shall be irretrievably plunged into a form of government rejected by the makers of the constitution or shall get back to the true principles of that instrument, depends on the turn which...
Your patriarchal address to your county is running through all the republican papers, and has a very great effect on the people. it is short, simple and presents things in a view they readily comprehend. the character & circumstances too of the writer leave them without doubts of his motives. if like the patriarch of old you had but one blessing to give us, I should have wished it directed to...
Your favor of April 25. has been duly recieved. were the case of mr Short’s demand one wherein he had left me to decide, I should not hesitate to accept the assurance in your letter in discharge of the US. but mr Short has peremptorily protested against acquitting the US. there was a hesitation on the part of the Secretary of state, whether mr Randolph’s receipt of the money was not by some...
I have received yr. Friendly Card of Salutation , & was much concerned at the information that the Fall of Stock was below all price in Phila.—we have made Enquiry here & find that there is no Market at any price; At the same time we have in Vain endeavoured to borrow the money to accommodate Mr. Short, and it being said that the price at Phila. for 6 pr. Cents was 16/. & so in proportion For...
I have to acknolege the reciept of your favor of Jan. 29. and as the rising of Congress seems now to be contemplated for about the last of this month, and it is necessary that I settle mr Short’s matter with the treasury before my departure, I take the liberty of saying a word on that subject. the sum you are to pay is to go to the credit of a demand which mr Short has on the treasury of the...
Since my last Mr. Lyons hath held a Council with those learned in the Science, who are of Opinion that the present time is very unfavorable for the Sale of our Stock; what is called the market price being very low, & None or very few Purchasers at that; it is supposed that during the Month of April, it will be known whether a rise happens or is in near prospect, & our conclusion is to wait til...
As soon as I shall have communed with Mr. Lyons on the propriety of selling our stock, you shall be informed when payment shall be made of Royal’s decree vs. Robinson’s Admors; the place I suppose will be Richmond. The rise or fall of that market price, probably depends on events rather likely to produce the latter, & may dictate a present sale, but the scarcity of Cash, it is said, will...
I recieved some time ago from mr Edmund Randolph a note signed by mr Lyons & yourself undertaking to pay the amount of a decree of Royle’s admrs v. yourselves as admrs of Robinson, to mr Short or myself as his attorney. this undertaking is perfectly satisfactory, and I only wait your pleasure to be signified as to the time when, and place where it may suit you to make the paiment. as it was to...
However as a citizen I may depricate the consequences of your retirement from the helm of our political barque in the present lowering season, yet as your friend I sincerely congratulate you on having eased your body and mind of that heavy and anxious weight, & returned to a tranquil private life with both in full vigor enabling you to enjoy the sweets of domestic ease and social converse,...
Letter not found. 1796? . Described as a one-page letter about private matters in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC, series 7, container 2).
Your favor of Jany. 6., owing to failures of the Mail South of Baltimore, did not come to hand within the usual time; and subsequent delays in the communication consultation & decision of Mr. Giles & myself, on the manner of publishing & applying your observations on the carriage tax, have brought down the return of my thanks for your favor to the present date. I read with real pleasure the...
Letter not found. 6 January 1796. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 7 Feb. 1796 . Asks JM to edit for publication Pendleton’s essay on the carriage tax, which Pendleton has given to William Branch Giles.
I have to thank you for two favrs. covering some Papers and the Anti-Lee Pamphlet. I recollect to have seen in the course of the Summer a Puff in some paper recommending it to the Voters to chuse representatives of the principles of that Gentn., who had distinguished himself from his Colleagues for true patriotism, but little immagined he would have ventured on a Serious Address to his...
From a long acquaintance with, and a sincere regard for you, I always feel pleasure in hearing from you—and of you—consequently, your letter of the 30th ult. was an acceptable annuity. Notwithstanding you have passed your 73 year, whilst you enjoy tolerable health, and retain your faculties in the vigor they are, I wish as well on public, as on private account, that length of days may be added...
I have recd. your favor of the 30 Ult: and am joined by my partner in the sincerest returns for your kind congratulations and friendly wishes. I hope this will find you in more confirmed health, and enjoying the commencement of a new year with every prospect that can make it a happy one. One of the papers inclosed gives you the latest news from Europe. It is to be hoped that the dawn of peace...
Lest I should suffer the year to expire, & recieve another rap on the knuckles for neglect, I take up the Pen to congratulate your safe return from the Westward, & on your having, as we hope, quelled the spirit of Anarchy & disorder in that quarter, without shedding other blood than what shall be found on a legal trial to have been justly forfeited to the Laws, a circumstance which affords...
Letter not found. 30 December 1794. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 8 Jan. 1795 . Congratulates JM and his wife on their marriage.
Your letter of the 5th instt came duly to hand. I know not from what source a report that, the next associate Judge was to be taken from the state of Georgia, could have been derived. Nothing from me, I can venture to say, gave rise to it; first, because there is no vacancy on that bench at present. 2d because, whenever one does happen, it is highly probable that a geographical arrangement...
Unwilling as I am to trouble you with Applications respecting the Appointments to Public Offices, I feel it a duty I am inclined to fulfill, to mention my Nephew Mr Nathaniel Pendleton, the present Fedral District Judge of Georgia; who, having heard that you intended to supply the next Vacancy in the Supreme Court, by appointment of a resident of that state, wishes to be considered as a...
The Resolutions of the Inhabitants of the County of Caroline, transmitted to me by you, were received with peculiar pleasure; because no Citizen of the United States can have a more sincere desire than I have to see all attempts at subverting or violating the Constitution or Laws of the Land, frustrated; and it gives me much satisfaction to be assured of the firm support of my Fellow Citizens...
With very sincere pleasure I received your private letter of the 11th instant. This pleasure was not a little enhanced by your reiterated assurance of my still holding that place in your estimation which, on more occasions than one, you have given me the most flattering testimony—highly gratifying to my mind. This assurance came opportunely, as I had begun to conceive (though unable to assign...
I am Hond with the Commands of a very respectable body of Citizens, my County men, to transmit to Yr Excellency the inclosed Copy of certain Resolutions which they yesterday judged it wise & necessary to enter into, declaratory of their Sentiments on certain Political Subjects. I can truly say that the Numbers, their information as to the Subjects discussed, but above all their pure...
Being called to a public communication with you, I feel an Indispensible duty & inclination to pay you my personal respects at the same time, if it were only to reiterate, which I hope is unnecessary, sincere Assurances that neither time, or the dirty scriblings with which the public has been lately pestered, have produced the smallest abatement in my private Affection for you, or my unlimited...
Since we had the pleasure of Col: Taylor’s arrival I have left in his better hands the trust of keeping you supplied with whatever communications might interest or amuse you. As the political scene here, is however soon to be suspended, I can not refuse myself the last opportunity I shall have before a dispersion of the dramatis personæ takes place, of enjoying the pleasure I always feel in...
As you find an amusement in our Newspapers I inclose two of the last; which however contain little of consequence, except a new report from the Treasury Dept. The Mover of the reference which gave birth to it declared he did not mean to authorize a proposition of new taxes, and it appeared that some at least voted for the Motion on that idea. You will find however that a different construction...
I am just favored with yours of the 28th. Ult. I wish I could remove your anxiety for the French. The last accounts are so imperfect & contradictory that it is difficult to make any thing of them. They come also thro’ the Brussels & English channels, which increases the uncertainty. It appears on the whole that the combination agst. the revolution, and particularly agst. their new republic, is...
Letter not found. 28 November 1792. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 6 Dec. 1792 . Expresses concern over the fate of the French.
Your favr. of the 14th. with the Packet of papers by Mr. Hoomes was a banquet indeed for which you’l please to accept my warmest Acknowledgements. It was the more so, as my Appetite for that kind of food had not been gratified for the Summer past, in consequence of my having taken it into my head that the tax on papers was unconstitutional, as tending to give Government a power over the...
I make use of the opportunity afforded by the return of Col. Hoomes to inclose a parcel of the late newspapers, which may contain some things not in the other papers you get. You will find in them all the particulars known here concerning the affairs of France; and sketches of the business as yet brought before Congress. The Presidents Speech & the two answers are I believe also in the...
… The Presidents getting the Representation Bill placed on constitutional ground by his Negative, and the stand made by the Judge against an unconstitutional Law, seem [to] give Gen’l pleasure, some few present Members of our Assembly & those who have imbibed prejudices there formerly, excepted as to the Judges. An Impeachment is said to be talked of, they don’t seem to approve so much the...
I know not whether this will find you in Phila. but I steal a moment to acknowledge, & thank you for 2 Packets received since I came here. The Presidents getting the Representation Bill placed on constitutional ground by his Negative, and the Stand made by the Judges agt. an unconstitul. Law, seem [to] give Genl. pleasure; Some few present Members of Our Assembly, & those who have imbibed...
You will find by the inclosed papers that the President’s Negative has saved us from the unconstitutional allotment of 120 Reps. proposed by the Bill on that subject. The contest is now to be between a ratio of 1 for 30, and 1 for 33 thousand. If the next bill should begin with the former, I think it most likely to end in the latter, this being most favorable to the Northern part of the Union,...
Your favor of the 14th. came to hand yesterday. You were right in saying “that the Northern Cocks are true game” but have erred in adding “that they die hard on the Representation bill.” Their perseverance has gained them a final victory. The bill passed on friday last in the form in which it was sent from the Senate; that is with the distribution of 120 members among the States, and the...
Letter not found. 14 March 1792. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 25 Mar. 1792 . Says “ ‘that the Northern Cocks are true game’” and “ ‘that they die hard in the Representation bill.’”
I am further Obliged by yr. Esteemed favr. of the 21st. & the Papers, a feast to a recluse shut up from Intelligence for a long spell of frosty weather. Yr. sudden Animadversions on the Subject of bounties to Classes of men in a few States, prove you needed not any hints from me on the Occasion, nor had I a conception you did, when I hazarded my thoughts on that important affair, or do so, on...
Your favor of the 8th. did not come to hand till this afternoon. I thank you for the very just & interesting observations contained in it. I have not yet met with an oppy. of forwarding the Report on Manufactures; nor has that subject been yet regularly taken up. The constitutional doctrine however advanced in the Report has been anticipated on another occasion, by its zealous friends; and I...