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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Pendleton, Edmund

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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Pendleton, Edmund"
Results 31-40 of 71 sorted by date (ascending)
Letter not found. 15 January 1791. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 13 Feb. 1791 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that the letter consisted of three pages and calendars it as follows: “British debts. The Bank system. The Judiciary. Direct taxes. Impost. Disposal of the Public Lands. The public debt. The Militia bill. Meeting ⟨of?⟩ debtors to British...
I have just received yr. very obliging favr. of the 2d. & have particularly to thank you for yr. Judicious Ansrs. to my several queries on the Subject of British debts, which I can truly say will have great weight with me; whether they will prove Satisfactory in removing my doubts, my head is not in a condition to decide, being just got through a Violent fever, with which I was taken on my...
Since the receipt of your favor of the 15 Jany. I have had the further pleasure of seeing your valuable observations on the Bank, more at length, in your communications to Mr. White. The subject has been decided, contrary to your opinion as well as my own, by large majorities in both Houses, and is now before the President. The power of incorporating can not by any process of safe reasoning,...
Letter not found. 14 March 1791. According to the list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany), Pendleton wrote a one-page letter to JM this day. The summary reads: “Stock speculations. Should a member of Congress be a Bank Director. The succession to the Presidency.”
The letter with which you were pleased to favor me—dated the 9th instt—overtook me at Littlepages bridge the 11th. The hurry into which I was thrown by a variety of occurrances at Richmond, prevented my acknowledging the receipt of it before I left that City. I now do it, with assurances that it gave me sincere pleasure to find by it that you were well. The general arrangement of the Surveys...
I take the liberty of troubling you once more in behalf of my Nephew Nathaniel Pendleton junr. of Georgia, who wishes to succeed Mr. Rutlidge in the Office he has resigned as a Judge of the Supreme Fœdral Court. He supposes a resident in the Southern district will be appointed, and that from Georgia, as the Carolinas have been already gratified; in which case he hopes his present rank of...
Caroline, 13 July 1791 . He has just received a letter from his nephew, Nathaniel Pendleton, Jr., of Georgia, informing him of the resignation of Mr. Rutledge as “one of the Judges of the Supreme Fœdral Court” and asking his influence in being appointed. He hands TJ his pretentions founded on supposition that the vacancy will be filled by a citizen of the Southern District; that, as North and...
I recieved duly your favour of the 13th. and communicated it to the President. The titles of your relation were unquestionably strong of themselves and still strengthened by your recommendation. But the place was before proposed to another whose acceptance will probably fix it. The President is indisposed with a tumour like that he had in New York the year before last. It does not as yet seem...
… Having spent 6 days in Richmond in hearing two Gent’n on each side argue the great Question respecting the recovery of British debts, I have for y’r amusement thrown together what I recollect of the General head of the Argument, which may not comprehend the whole of those since I took no notes, & give it from a faulty memory. They spake well on both sides, but Mr Henry was truly Great, & for...
Having spent 6 days in Richmond in hearing two Gentn. on each side argue the great Question respecting the recovery of British debts, I have for yr. amusement thrown together what I recollect of the General heads of the Argument, which may not comprehend the whole of those since I took no Notes, & give it from a faulty memory. They spake well on both sides, but Mr. Henry was truly great, & for...