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    • Pendleton, Edmund

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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Pendleton, Edmund"
Results 21-30 of 71 sorted by date (ascending)
Letter not found. 2 April 1790. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 13 Apr. 1790 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) notes that the letter consisted of one page and calendars it as follows: “Further objections to Hamilton’s plan. The progress of liberty in Europe.”
I should have sooner acknowledged yr. obliging favr. of March 4th., but was taken wth. a Cold about the time of it’s receipt, which, as usual, brought on a fever & short breathing, from which I am but now relieved. I thank you for your Attention to Dr. Murrow’s application. The Secretary’s Plan of finance is really too deep for my comprehension, I cannot however accord with his position that...
You will see by the papers herewith covered that the proposed assumption of the State debts continues to employ the deliberations of the House of Reps. The question seems now to be near its decision, and unfortunately, tho’ so momentous a one, is likely to turn on a very small majority, possibly on a single vote. The measure is not only liable to many objections of a general cast, but in its...
I thank you for your favor of the 2d. instant. From the sentiments expressed in it you will hear with pleasure that the proposed assumption of the State debts, was yesterday negatived, after many days deliberation, by 31 vs 29. We hoped that this vote would have been mortal to the project. It seems however that it is not yet to be abandoned. The other part of the Secretary’s Report has been...
I am further Obliged by your Favr. of the 4th. & two Packets of papers accompanying it. I congratulate you on having that ill-judged & improper measure of Assuming the State debts, ’ere this determined; & tho’ a large Majority on so important a Subject, was desirable, yet I shall be glad to hear it is finally negatived even by a decis[i]on from the Chair. It has fix’d a Suspicion of a...
I thank you very sincerely for the readiness with which you have complied with my troublesome request on the subject of the Stamp-Act. I made it on a supposition that you had been present at the proceedings of the Virga. Assembly, which I find was not the case. But, knowing the accuracy & extent of your intelligence on all such interresting occurrences, I consider the particulars with which...
The pressure of business as the session approaches its term, the earlier hour at which the House of Representatives has for some time met, and the necessity of devoting a part of the interval to exercise, after so long a confinement, have obliged me to deny myself the pleasure of communicating regularly with my friends. I regret much that this violation of my wishes has unavoidably extended...
… I am happy to find that Potowmac stands on so good grounds as the Permanent seat of Congress. I could not help wishing that the temporary Residence had remain’d at New York, as a recompense for their expence in y’r Accommodation; to save the expence & trouble of a double removal of the Public Offices, and from a conviction, that Philadelphia is in bad order for y’r reception, & must incur a...
I am indebted to you for two or three Letters, besides Packets of papers, An Arrear probably as convenient to you in yr. Congressional Engagements, affording little liesure for reading uninteresting letters, as it was unavoidable by me, having been for more than 3 weeks closely confined in Attending the Court of Appeals, wherein we dispatched much buisiness [ sic ], none worth communicating as...
Previous to my leaving N. Y. I recd. a letter from you which was not then answered, because the subject of it required more consideration than could then be spared and because an answer was not prompted by any thing agitated or proposed on the subject, in Congress. I am afraid that notwithstanding the interval which has passed I am still not sufficiently prepared to do justice to your queries,...