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    • Pendleton, Edmund
    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Pendleton, Edmund" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 21-30 of 35 sorted by date (descending)
If the contents of the Newspapers of this place find their way into the gazettes of Richmond you will have learnt that the expedition of Genl: Lincoln against the insurgents has effectually dispersed the main body of them. It appears however that there are still some detachments which remain to be subdued. & that the Government of Massts. consider very strong precautions as necessary agst....
Your favor of the 9th. Ult. has been so long on hand unanswered that I can not now acknowledged it without observing in apology for the delay that I waited for some measures of which I wished to communicate the event. The district bill of which I formerly made mention, was finally thrown into a very curious situation, and lost by a single voice. I refer you for its history to Col. Pendleton,...
I thank you For yr. Favr. of the 30th. past and For your kind concern about my health, which has been better than usual For about three Weeks past, but in truth rises and falls like the flame of an expiring Candle in the Socket, & seem[s] to forbid all hopes of so radical a cure, as I am sure yr. Plan For accelerating the Admon of Justice, if carried into effect would prove to the present...
Your favor of the 19th. inclosing a bill for amending a defective law gave me particular pleasure as it involved a proof of more health than report had allowed you. I anxiously wish that a blessing the smallest degree of which in your hands is always producing good to your Country may in the fullest manner be re-established. You are not wrong in supposing apprehensions in many of danger from...
Letter not found. 19 November 1786. The calendar of Pendleton’s letters (DLC: Madison Miscellany) apparently prepared by a clerk for Peter Force around 1850 cites this letter. The annotations indicate the one-page letter included comments on the attempted reform of the county court system and “Congratulations on reappointment to Congress.” Enclosed was a draft of a bill for amending the county...
A severe Paroxism of my old disorder having deprived me of the pleasure of seeing you this Session, I take the liberty of submitting to your consideration a Bill I drew some time ago to amend the Act for reforming the County Courts, as it Occur’d to me that considerable delays might happen in the quarterly returns of process instead of Monthly, especially where the first process was not...
Letter not found. 18 December 1784 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) indicates Pendleton wrote a letter from Edmundsbury on this day that was an “Appeal for the family of Philip Davis; a forger of tobacco notes.” The punishment for forging tobacco notes was death ( Hening, Statutes William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the...
I am unwilling at all times to intermeddle with the business of the legislature, & particularly concerned when under a necessity of making application to a particular friend of that body, but when I am impelled to it by the situation of a distressed Neice, & a family of her small Children, I know your own feelings will suggest my Appology. She is the unfortunate wife of Philip Davis, who is...
Summary ( LC : Madison Miscellany). The summary is in a calendar, probably prepared about 1850 by Peter Force’s clerk. He noted that the letter was addressed “To James Madison” and that the manuscript was “1 page 4°.” Madison’s retirement from Congress. Congress has fixed its permanent residence in the woods of the Jersies. The importance of Madison taking a seat in the Virginia Assembly....
I am now, probably for the last time, to pay you my respects, as the time approaches fast (too fast) when you are to quit Congress, & return to yr. Countrey & friends—pray accept my warmest acknowledgements for the pleasure you have afforded me in continuing a long Correspondence, upon such disadvantageous terms, as my Sterile returns occasioned: however I did my best, & you accepted it; and...