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    • Parsons, Samuel Holden
    • Washington, George

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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Parsons, Samuel Holden" AND Correspondent="Washington, George"
Results 61-110 of 174 sorted by date (descending)
I did not call at Westpoint on my Way to this place as I thought it of Importance to be with the assembly before the End of their Session; in which I was disappointed the Session being over. I immediately waited on the Governor and Council: and find the assembly have order’d One Thousand five Hundred Men for the Continental Army and apportion’d this Number to the Towns; Two Thousand five...
I am honor’d with your Excellency’s Letter of the 12th Inst.; in which I am desird to join the Army as soon as I can make it convenient, in Consequence of which I intended to have joind my Brigade next Week; but at present I am unable to undertake so long a Journey being troubled with Disorders which prevent my riding any considerable Distance, but I hope within ten or fifteen Days to be able...
I have recd your favr of the 6th and am pleased to find that the Legislature are at length taking measures to satisfy their Officers and Soldiers—It is to be wished that their want in respect to Cloathing and other matters could be immediately supplied, but I am in hopes they will wait patiently a while longer, when they see that proper steps are pursuing to make provision for them. I had,...
By Letters from Colo. Sherman & other Officers I am informd of the Distresses of the Connecticutt Line of Officers, for Want of Clothing and should be happy if I could give them fairer Prospects of Supplies from this State. the Legislature have voted Monies for that Purpose and appointed their Agent to purchase, but the Monies are not collected nor is any Clothing yet procurd; the Truth is,...
The Assembly of this State were delay’d by the severe weather near a Fortnight, and since they have conven’d have not taken up the Subject of recruiting the Army; I have applied to the Governor as well as the Gentlemen of the Assembly on the Subject, and am inform’d that neither your Excellency or Congress have made any Requisition to this State for that Purpose. I am induc’d to beleive the...
I have sent by a Gaurd Wm Davenport and Samuel Marsh, two Persons taken by the Patroles from woodbridge last night: Davenport was imployd in the Service of the States in 1776, and joind the Enemy on the Retreat through Jersey in that year; and since that Time has been imployd in the Se[r]vice of the Enemy, and was about 6 weeks since in Arms with a Party of the Enemy in Jersey: and is...
I am inform’d that the Fleet which had fallen down to the Hook Saild Yesterday at 2 o’Clock P.M. and consisted of near 100 sail under Convoy of 1 Ship of 74 Guns & 1 of 40 Guns & one of 36 Guns bound to Europe, No Troops on Board —The Fleet with Troops are still at the Watering Place ’tis expected this Fleet will fall down to the Hook about the forepart of next Week —The Horse on Staten...
I received Yesterday both Your Letters of that date. The Note Mr Tilghman gave was only intended to authorise Hatfield to meet his Brother once, whom he expressed a desire of seeing and from which occasion he expected he might obtain some interesting intelligence. From the information I have had of the character of this family of people—I am by no means satisfied that they would answer any...
I am inform’d that forty Sail of Transports fell down to the Narrows last Fryday said to be a fleet for England, no Troops on Board, but Transports with Troops have been faling down every Day since; Genl Clinton’s & Ld Cornwalli⟨s’s⟩ Baggage I am informd (so that I think it cannot be doubted) Are imbarkd—Yesterday a Conversation was had among their Officers on whom the Command would devolve on...
Letters not found: from Brig. Gen. Samuel Holden Parsons, 22 Dec. 1779. GW wrote Parsons on 23 Dec.: “I received Yesterday both Your Letters of that date.”
I have recd your favr of the 16th—I am fully of opinion that those people who undertake to procure intelligence under cover of carrying produce into New York, and bringing out Goods in return, attend more to their own emoluments than to the Business with which they are charged, and we have generally found their information so vague and trifling, that there is no placing dependance upon it....
The Embarkation in New York was not completed this Morning, by information of a Gentleman who left the City this Morning. The Number designd to be imbarked is said to be 8400; Ld Rawdon’s Corps, and Skinner’s Brigade except Buskirk’s Regiment, and two british Regiments left Staten Island the 14th for New York said to be designd as part of the present Embarkation, the Object is understood, in...
the objects of the detachment under your command are to cover the Country from Newark to Perth Amboy and the Magazines of Forage in the Vicinity—to give protection to the well affected Inhabitants and restrain the others by preventing all kind of intercourse with the Enemy—and to obtain by every means in your power the best intelligenc[e]s of their movements and designs—I leave it to your own...
Colo. Lamb informs me that there are some men in the Connecticut line who had been inlisted for three Years who would now reinlist for the War in the Companies of Artillery raised and adopted by the State, but that you did not conceive yourself at liberty to allow such a measure without order. I am clearly of opinion that if those Men will not reinlist in the Corps of Infantry to which they...
Lieut. Colonel Gray waits upon your Excellency for your Directions concerning a Quantity of Goods in his Hands, seis’d last Winter from One Scudder who had Plunderd them from the Inhabitants of Long Island, the particulars of which you was made acquainted with and approv’d of Col. Gray’s Conduct in the Affair. agreable to your Directions the Admiralty Court in Connecticutt tried the Justice of...
Letter not found : from Samuel Holden Parsons, 1 Aug. 1779. On 1 Aug., GW wrote Parsons: “I return you my thanks for the intelligence contained in your letter of this date.”
I return you my thanks for the intelligence contained in your letter of this date & shall be ob[l]iged to you, to communicate any thing further that may come to your knowledge—especially if it should be of importance. I have not the least objection to your employing the corporal & six men as you propose. If Mr Pomroy has accepted the appointment you mention, he cannot hold, his rank in the...
last Night I receivd the inclosed Depositions of the Savage Conduct of the British Troops at New Haven; these are but a small Number of many Instances of similar Barbarities in that Town, the Depositions from Fairfield I expect every Hour when they arrive I will transmit them. I am Yr Excellencys Obedt Servt ALS , DNA:PCC , item 152; copy, DNA:PCC , item 169. GW enclosed the ALS in a letter to...
The Supposd Strength of the Enemy, and our own Numbers and Preparations as Stated by your Excellency to the Council will in my Opinion oblige Us to adopt a defensive System until our Army is considerably increasd in Numbers and other Preparations for offensive Operations; the Posts in the Highlands are of so much Importance as ought to induce Us to defend them at every Hasard; for that Purpose...
Inclosd is a Report of the Number of Houses Stores &c. burnt at Norwalk the 11th Inst. the Enemy were so necessarily attentive to their own Safety whilst they remaind in Town and retird with so much Precipitation when they began their Retreat, as left them no Time to perpetrate those Acts of Cruelty & Brutal Savageness they were guilty of in other Places. they had however Opportunity to...
I have this Moment returnd from Sawpitts & Kingstreet, where I am informd that the Enemy have advancd a Party of Horse & Foot this afternoon to Harrison’s Purchase; and that the greater Part of the Troops movd Yesterday afternoon from Maroneck towards White Plains. the Fleet after lying about Twelve Hours before this Town have gone Westward to Day and are now at Anchor nearly Opposite New...
your Excellency’s Letter of the 13th I receivd this Morning and shall pay a particular Attention to procure an exact detail of the Mischiefs done by the Enemy at the different Places both on the Persons & Property of the Inhabitants, the Movments of the Enemy and the apparent Prospects of a speedy Descent upon Stamford has hitherto so far ingagd my Attention as to prevent my paying that...
I received yours of the 11th last night, and I beg you will present my particular thanks to Capt. Betts and such others of the Officers and men, as well of the Militia as of the Continental troops, who distinguished themselves upon the present occasion—I shall be obliged to you to take the speediest measures to procure me an exact detail of the mischief done by the enemy at the different...
It is probable that the public may have occasion or at least wish to know at some period—the extent of the Enemy’s depredations and cruelties; indeed it is right that the World should know ’em. I therefore request that you will endeavour as far as Opportunity will permit to ascertain, as precisely as you can, what number of Houses they have destroyed in their expedition up the sound,...
I have just received yours of yesterday—I am happy to hear of the spirited behaviour of the Militia. They have certainly done themselves great honor; if the opposition they give is not absolutely effectual, it serves to discourage the enemy and make them sick of such excursions—I shall be glad to learn they have met with a proper reception at Norwalk. Before this reaches you, you will have...
In my last, I informd that the Enemy landed last Night: at four this Morning the Enemy on their Advance were met by the Militia & some Skirmishing insued, but without any considerable Effect on either Side; at about Six o’Clock the Troops under Genl Wolcott, & my Small Detachment of 150 Conl Troops were joind & took possession of an Emminece the North End of the Town. the Enemy advanced in our...
I have received Your favors of the 9th from Luddington’s & Redding. It gives me ⟨g⟩reat concern to hear of the ravages of the Enemy. The conduct of the Militia at New Haven does them the highest honor. I had heard of it before thro several channels. I have written to Genl Heath to move with ⟨th⟩e Two Connecticut Brigades towards the Enemy, ⟨b⟩y the way of Crompond in the first instance ⟨a⟩nd...
I arrived here last night and find the fleet which transport the British Incendiaries is returned to Huntington Bay opposite to this Town where they now are. The Troops employd for these purposes are, by the best information I can get, about 2,000 commanded by Governor Tryon. At New Haven the few Militia gathered in season to oppose the enemys progress, behavd with great resolution and...
Letter not found : from Brig. Gen. Samuel Holden Parsons, 9 July 1779. GW wrote Parsons on 10 July: “I have received Your favors of the 9th from Luddington’s & Redding.” The letter that Parsons wrote from the location of Henry Ludington’s mills and home in Dutchess County, N.Y., is the one that has not been found.
I have this Moment arrivd here after a Tour of Sixty Miles Since 11 o’Clock last Night: The few Militia at New Haven behavd exceeding well, repulsd the Enemy several Times & considerable Loss was sufferd by the Enemy; they burnt a Number of Houses at East & West Haven & plunderd New Haven: they have destroyd Fairfield, almost every House: the Abuses of Women, Children & Old Men are unparaleld:...
Letter not found : from Brig. Gen. Samuel Holden Parsons, 8 July 1779. GW wrote Parsons on this date: “I have yours of this day.”
A day or two ago, you expressed a desire to go towards the Sound on some private business—At present you may Unite this object with the public service—It is probable from different accounts the enemy have made an incursion into Connecticut; if so you may be useful by taking the direction of the militia which may be assembling to oppose them, if you can arrive in time—You have therefore my...
General Patterson joind his Brigade last Evening and is now on the Point; when the public Service will admit I shall be happy to join my Brigade at such Place as will most conduce to the general Welfare. Your Excellency was pleasd to desire my Opinion of the Disposition to be made of the Army. Under all Circumstances I think 3000 Men should be assignd for garrisoning this Post, by which, I...
In Answer to your Question by Cpt. Christie of 3d Pensylvania Regt I have deliver’d him a general Information of the State of this Garrison which will be explaind by the Proper Key The Garrison is in high Spirits and are very desirous to receive the Enemys Attack. I cannot promise the Post will be defended, but I am certain every Exertion will be made by the Troops to secure the Possession of...
Your favours of the 11th and 15th instant came duly to hand with Lieut. Jackson’s and Ensign Tuttles resignations. I have on several occasions expressed my sentiments on the policy of preventing as much as possible all plundering parties. I would only observe on the present that the Officers are to persue my former instructions on this head which I beleive extends to all cases where the...
I have inclosd the Commission and Resignation of Lt Hitchcock of the 8th Regiment, and request your Excellency to discharge him. I am Satisfied the good of the Service and Peace of the Regiment require it. I hope your Excellency will not be troubled with many more from my Brigade. I expect Two or three will resign which I beleive will close the Scene. By your Excellency’s Last Letter I suppose...
Letter not found : from Samuel Holden Parsons, 15 May 1779. GW wrote to Parsons on 28 May : “Your favours of the 11th and 15th instant came duly to hand.”
You will find by my last letter of the 11th instant, that I considered the circumstances of your brigade on the receipt of my orders for its march, as a sufficient reason for the measure you took on the occasion. I mention this in answer to your favor of the 6th instant. In case the brigade is at its old post, you will continue it there, agreeable to my instructions on this subject—but should...
Your two favors of the 2d & 3d instant with their inclosures have been duly received. It was my intention that your brigade should have reinforced the highland posts in the first instance; however as it was under circumstances on the receipt of the order, which made it expedient for Gen: Huntington’s to march, his need not be recalled; and yours will remain on its present ground till my...
Letter not found : from Samuel Holden Parsons, 11 May 1779. GW wrote to Parsons on 28 May : “Your favours of the 11th and 15th instant came duly to hand.”
by the inclosd Copy of a Letter from Mr Hubbard your Excellency will be able to form a Judgment of the Embarasments in the Way of my Brigade’s marching so early as I could wish. This is no Neglect of mine: on the 23d of April the Day I received your Excellencys Letters of the 17th & 19th I sent to Mr Hubbard desiring him to send in the Horses and Teams belonging to the Brigade and forward the...
On reviewing my Letter of Yesterday I find I have not fully expresd my Intentions respecting the March of the Brigade under my Command. I suppose from the Tenor of your Excellency’s Letters an immediate Danger is apprehended at the North River and in that Case it becomes necessary to reinforce those Posts sooner than it will be possible to collect my Baggage & out Guards and march my Brigade;...
Your Letter of the 28th Ulo directed to the Commanding Officer here came safe to me about four o’Clock this Morning. according to your Excellency’s former Orders of the 23d I had given Orders to General Huntington’s Brigade (whose Tour of Duty it is mine having perform’d the last) to hold themselves in Readiness to march on the Shortest Notice and on receiving Inteligence of the Embarkation of...
Your letter of the 25th April has been duly received with its several inclosures. I am pleased to find every thing wear so much the appearance of preparation for motion. I shall take immediate measures with Genl Knox to have the deficiencies in the arms, and accoutrements furnished the Troops in your quarter. At the same time I cannot help regreting that so great deficiencies should occur...
your Excellency’s Letter of the 23d Inst. with the Inteligence from Genl Maxwell inclosd I receivd this Afternoon. I have receivd Information that about the 22d Inst. a large Number of Empty Waggons came up to Fort Washington; the Enemy for about a fortnight past have Prohibited all Passing over King’s Bridge and observe the greatest Secrecy in their Transactions at that Post. The Accounts we...
I have the Honor of your Excellency’s Letters of the 12th, 17th & 19th Inst. I have in Consequence of your Directions to Put this Division of the Troops in Perfect Readiness to march by the 10th of May next, orderd the Detachments made from the Division to New London and other Places remote from Camp to join the Division immediately and hope Nothing will prevent the Troops being ready to march...
I have been duly favored with your letters of the 8th and 16th instant. In cases of resignation the officer is to transmit me a proper certificate of his having settled all regimental or public accounts; accompanied with his commission; which latter will be returned him (if an old commission), with his resignation indorsed. I would observe on that of the 8th—that the security of our army, and...
An Officer sent to Long Island returnd the 14th and informs the Enemy’s Troops at the East End of the Island have their Baggage pack’d Up, and that One Regiment have marchd Westward by the South Road. That a Packett has lately arriv’d in New York from England, and tis reported that the Ships in the Sound are orderd to New York. He says there are very few Troops on Lloyd’s Neck and about Thirty...
I receiv’d a Letter Yesterday from Colo. Gray of which the following is an Extract. “This Moment Lt Tiffany returnd from Long Island who informs me that a Body of Hessians are marching from the Westward, but were not so far up the Island as Huntington: that Officer’s Baggage every Day is transporting toward the East End, that the Militia of the two western Counties are to assemble this Week at...
I was last Week on my return from this Place to Camp; but on receiving Inteligence of the Enemy’s moving toward this Place have returnd. the Commander in Chief of the Enemy’s Forces is said to be at Southampton, a Fleet of Thirty Sail of Ships and other Vessels have arrivd at Sagg Harbour through the Sound. Thirty Ships have arrivd Yesterday at Newport; a Fleet of Twenty five Vessels left...