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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Mason, John"
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A large Family now growing up about me, and every day impressing more and more strongly on my mind the necessity of giving my whole attention to my own concerns, has determined me to divest myself, for that purpose, with as little delay as possible of the public trusts with which I have been honoured. I therefore beg leave to offer my Resignation of the office of Superintendant of Indian...
¶ John Mason to Dolley Madison. Letter not found. 8 June 1814. Described as a two-page autograph letter in Anderson Catalogue No. 995 (1913), item 162. Asks her opinion of a “plaister cast” of JM taken “from a Die, cut after the bust made by the Italian artist last year, and intended to impress medals for the Indians.”
I have recd. your letter of the 24th. instant with its several inclosures. My answer to your preceding one renders it unnecessary to do more than express my approbation of the very proper reply you have given to the letter from the British Commissary General of Prisoners. The persevering detention of our Seamen who were on board British Ships, when war was declared, will engage particular...
Letter not found. 24 September 1813. Acknowledged in JM to Mason, 29 Sept. 1813 , which suggests that Mason’s letter probably enclosed copies of British commissary general of prisoners Thomas Barclay’s letter to Mason of 17 Sept. 1813, and of Mason’s 22 Sept. 1813 reply. Barclay enclosed a copy of an undated letter from British Rear Admiral Edward Griffith stating that he had authorized the...
I have this day reccd. your letter of the 21t. instant, with the letters & papers from our Agent for prisoners of War at Halifax. The encouragement which the Enimy seem to derive from our reluctance to retaliate their cruelty towards our military citizens in captivity, requires that an appeal should be made without delay, to their feelings for their own unfortunate people, as they have none...
Letter not found. 21 September 1813. Acknowledged in JM to Mason, 23 Sept. 1813 , which suggests that Mason’s letter probably enclosed a 3 Sept. 1813 letter to Mason from John Mitchell, U.S. agent for prisoners at Halifax, and a copy of Mitchell’s letter of the same date to Lt. William Miller, British agent for prisoners at Halifax. In the latter, written at 8 a.m., Mitchell requested that...
14 May 1813, Washington. In accordance with “the second Section of the act entitled ‘an act to ascertain the Compensation of Public Ministers,’ passed May 10th 1800,” certifies that John Mason has expended $19,000 under JM’s direction “for the Contingent Expences of foreign intercourse the particulars of which expenditure it is not deemed advisable to specify.” Given as a voucher so Mason can...
M r John Eliason , Merchant of this Town, proposing to visit you on some matter of Business, has requested me to mention him to you. I shall take the liberty to do so with pleasure, altho’ I cannot speak otherwise than generally on the Subject, having latterly been much withdrawn from mercantile business, I have had but few Transactions with Mr Eliason . I can however assure you Sir, that his...
I take the liberty to send you a letter I received today—the writer Mr. Ricketts is a wealthy and respectable Man—living in the Country near Alexandria, and altho’ illeterate, of strong sagacious mind—& a firm friend to your administration—as it appeared to me he had taken a pretty correct view of the Subject of which he treats I really thought it my Duty Sir to send it you; in which if I have...
9 March 1813 , “ Indian office .” “In conformity with the law of 2d. March 1811 —I have the honour to transmit a statement of the salaries of the agents assistant agents and Clerks at the several trading houses with the Indian tribes—from the 1st. day of april 1812 the day to which payment was last made for them from the treasury for one year amount $10383.28 and to sollicit that you will be...
I entreat you to attribute the Subject of this letter to it’s true motive—the most honest and sincere desire to do public good, in however small a degree it may be in my power to contribute toward it. You will receive Sir, by this same mail a letter from Mr Rush, which has been written after several earnest and anxious conversations between him and myself, as to the present Crisis, and...
I have the honour to state that William M. Stewart appointed by you on the 10th. Inst. to be assistant Indian agent at Fort Madison, has declined the acceptance of that office because on account of the Illness of his father he is not able to leave his family, as promptly as the occasion requires. It being a matter of importance in the present state of the Indian country that the person...
10 August 1812, Indian Office. Recommends assistant agent Robert P. Bayly for the office of Indian agent at the trading house on Chickasaw Bluffs, left vacant by the death of John B. Treat. Recommends William M. Stewart as assistant agent at Fort Madison, to fill the vacancy left by the resignation of Asa Payne. RC ( DLC ); letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 75, Letters Sent by the Superintendent of...
8 July 1812 , “ Indian Office .” “By the Law of the 2d. March 1811 relative to trading Houses with the Indian tribes, the manner of drawing the money, for the payment of the salaries of the Agents, assistant agents and Clerks at the trading Houses having been altered, on application to the Secretary of the Treasury in the month of December last—I learned from him, that when the requisite...
24 July 1811, Indian Office. Informs JM that Samuel Tupper, factor in the trading house at Sandusky, has asked permission to resign and suggests that Jacob B. Varnum of Massachusetts be appointed in his place. RC ( DNA : RG 75, Letters Received by Superintendent of Indian Trade); letterbook copy ( DNA : RG 75, Letters Sent by Superintendent of Indian Trade). RC 1 p.; with JM’s notation,...
I fear you will have thought me negligent, in not haveing sooner replied to the letter I had the pleasure to receive from you last month—I beg you will be assured Sir I lost not a moment in prepareing for a Satisfactory Reply— I had taken from me, this Spring, by the Teeth of the ground Mouse, a little animal very numerous and troublesome here, all the Seed Turnips of every kind I had set out:...
You were so kind, when I left Washington , as to give me some seed of the Swedish turnep. I sowed it carefully, but a drought from the middle of July till autumn, prevented a single plant from coming to perfection. can you give me a few seeds now, & inform me when you plant them. M c Mahon directs it in April or May . but this is so different from the season of sowing other turneps that I am...
I had the honour to intimate to you in conversation the other day that remonstrances had been made by some of the agents for Indian Trade in the Upper Mississippi against the facility with which british Traders obtained licences to trade in that quarter. On that subject, it has occurred to me to be my duty to communicate to you Sir a letter lately received from the agent at Fort Madison. Mr....
1 February 1810. Recommends that Nathan Lufborough and Walter S. Chandler be appointed as magistrates for the northwest part of the county of Washington. RC ( DNA : RG 46, President’s Messages, Executive Nominations, 11B-A2). 1 p. Signed by Mason and twenty-one others. On 6 Feb. 1810 JM nominated Lufborough and Chandler to be justices of the peace for Washington County in the District of...
24 July 1809, Georgetown. Has been solicited to write a letter of recommendation for Alexander Scott, who seeks appointment as judge for District of Columbia. Admits he knows little of Scott’s legal background but can assure JM of the applicant’s respectable “connections and standing in life.” Moreover, “his political principles have been uniformly & soundly republican.” RC ( DNA : RG 59,...
The letter which I have now the honour to enclose, came to my hands yesterday, under cover with a letter of business, relative to his accounts, from Mr Rodolph Tellier (late agent at the indian trading house which was established at the cantonment at Belle Fontaine near St Louis, now discontinued) and to which was the following postscript—“I intended to send the enclosed to his Excellency the...
The republicans and friends of the late administration, of George Town , animated by the purest sentiments of gratitude and affection, beg leave to express to you those emotions inspired by the interesting crisis of your departure from public life. Devoted as you have been for so long a period of time, to the service of your country, endeared by your unceasing cares for our national...
Th: Jefferson has recieved the seeds which General Mason has been so kind as to send him, and returns him many thanks for them. they will be a valuable acquisition to him. he is very sensible of the kind sentiments expressed in his note and assures him he reciprocates them sincerely to mrs Mason & himself, and that at whatever distance withdrawn from them, the information of their welfare will...
J. Mason presents his Respects to the President, and with very great pleasure sends him the garden seeds asked in his note of the other day, in addition to which he begs his acceptance of a few of the Buda-Kale—an excellent kind of Cantaleup—Spanish Tomatoe (very much larger than the common kind)—and Estragon, from the plant the President was so good to send JM. a year or two agoe, which has...
Th: Jefferson presents his compliments to Genl. Mason and being about to retire to a country life, where his garden will be a principal amusement, he is making up his emplettes of seeds. he has to beg of Genl. Mason some seeds of the egg plant; to which he must add a little of the Ruta baga, or Swedish turnep, he knows that this last is to be had at the shops, but he has remarked that which...
In consequence of the intimation made by you, when I had the honor to converse with you a few days ago on the subject of the capture of a parcell of Peltries the property of the United States on board the Ship Little William of Philadelphia, I have obtained the testimony of the two Gentlemen who were clerks in this Office at the time of the shipment in question and an attestation by them of...
I enclose you your note for $500 Paid at the Bank of Columbia on the 30th. Ulto. by your Check on the office of Disct: and Deposit then sent me, for that purpose, as also your acct: with me on the Transaction of your Discts. at sd. Bank, on notes endorsed by me, stated, for Your Information, from the beginning; Balc. due me, the last discount only, $ 4 75/100. The result of this negotiation...
I beg leave to represent that in the month of June last, there was shipped by my Predecessor in Office, Genl. John Shee, on board the american Ship Little William, of Philada. Capt. Harrison, destined for Tonningen, a parcell of Peltry, the property of the United States and consigned for sale on their account, to Mr. Chas. F. Nagel Merchant at that place, value on board at Philadelphia Dollars...
Mr. Theodore Mansfield of New York will do himself the honor to hand this Letter, he has been introduced to me as a very respectable Man by one of my Friends in that City—He is desirous of obtaining leave to send a Ship to Europe, under circumstances which he will explain himself—I beg permission, Sir, to present him to you— With very great Respect I have the honor to be Sir Your mo ob Servt...
Th: Jefferson presents his salutations to Genl. Mason & sent him this morning his plant of Terragon, not doubting that the best measure to preserve it is to place it in his hands. when he shall have multiplied the stock, Th:J. will ask for some plants to carry to Monticello. MBBS .