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    • Washington Presidency
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    • Mason, John

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Documents filtered by: Period="Washington Presidency" AND Correspondent="Mason, John"
Results 1-12 of 12 sorted by date (ascending)
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Bordeaux, 11 July 1789 . On Cutting’s information, he informs TJ that the Washington , Capt. Bond, is there, destined in 10 days for Potomac river but can touch at Norfolk: “a fine fast sailing ship of 250 to 300 Tons with excellent accomodations and a very clever Man as Captain.” If TJ wishes to take her it will give him pleasure to detain her. “She goes out in ballast and being an american...
I am honored with your favor of the 11th. and sincerely thank you for the offer of your ship, which I would certainly have embraced, had I been at liberty to go. But I have not yet received permission, and must await that. I beg you to remember me in the most friendly terms to your father. I have put off answering his letter because I expected constantly to make my voyage to America and to see...
I had the Honour to address you twelve or fourteen days agoe by way of Potomac covering a collection of Pamph[l]ets relative to the Revolution we have just experienced in this Country which from their extraordinary nature hoped might have been acceptable —now by way of Phila. I take the Liberty (in case of miscarriage) to send you a Acct of them with an addition of some which have since...
Bordeaux, 8 Sep. 1789 . Regretted extremely to learn from TJ’s letter of July that he was not at liberty to sail then, as “the Ship and Season provided a safe and agreable Passage.” Will be glad to keep him informed about boats sailing from Bordeaux and to make arrangements there.—“I am sorry Sir to be troublesome to you about my little affairs, when you may be occupied about those of much...
In answer to your favor of the 8th. inst. I am to inform you that no premium is as yet decided on for the importation of wheat or flour after the present month. The ministers however are sensible there will be a want of that article, and seem disposed to give a premium. They will take it into consideration very shortly, and make it public if they decide on a bounty. With respect to tobacco,...
I have received your letter of the 14th of August together with its enclosures, for which, as well as for the polite offer of your services, I beg you to accept my best thanks. On the 16th and 25th of August I wrote to the House of Fenwick, Mason and Co. requesting them to furnish me with a quantity of the best claret, which letters, I presume have got to hand. I am Sir, your most obedient...
Having lately heard from France it was probable that, that Government Would make Application to You, to Supply them with the different products of this Country in payment of the American Debt; Embolden’d by a persuasion that my Situation in Commerce (having a House there & another here, & a good experience in Negotiations with that Country) may in the present Juncture enable me to Serve the...
Having lately Seen it was proposed in france to make Applications to the Executive of the United States to furnish in American Produce part of their Debt, and Supposing it probable if such a measure is adopted Some of the purchases might be made to greater advantage on Potomac, Rappahanok and James River than North of them, I take the Liberty thro’ you Sir to Offer my Services (Say those of my...
I have been longer without answering your favor of Apr. 26. than I would have been if the answer could be of any consequence. I knew also that the same information was handed you thro another channel, which I have now to give, and give only in respect to your letter. The government of the US. will not meddle with the investment of the monies they will pay to France. They will pay the cash to...
Being now returned to the neighborhood of Philadelphia, and business resumed in that place, I will pay on sight Mr. Fenwick’s draught: be pleased to accompany it with your own for the little disbursements made for me about the box of books &c. or if you prefer it, write me the amount of the whole, and I will remit you a bank post-note on the collector of George town by the return of the post...
In due course I was honoured with your Letter of 20th. Ulto. It is from our Connection with that City quite as convenient, to receive in Philadelphia at present as here, and not to trouble you with remitting, we send now to our Friends Messrs. Joseph Anthony & Son who will present it—F. M. & Cos. Draft on you for 205 Ds. 42 Cts. We have written to our Friend in Baltimore for the amount of the...
So long ago as June 29. of the last year I inclosed you a draught on Caleb Lownes of Philadelphia for 92 D-80 c the amount of my balance to Mason & Fenwick, and desired Mr. Lownes to answer it out of monies placed in his hands. I was surprised yesterday, on receiving an account from him to find that the money still lies in his hands uncalled for. Apprehending my letter must have miscarried,...