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J. Madison with his thanks to Mr Van Buren for the Copy of the Presidents Message of the 22d. reciprocates his congratulations on the event, which terminates the difficulties with France. It is a happy denouement of an embarrassing controversy, apparently working itself into a knot, for which the sword alone might be a match. The following ommitted [None perhaps, rejoice on this occasion, more...
I have recd. Sir your letter of the 16. inst. requesting such information as I might be able to give pertaining to a Biography of your father in Law the late Chief Justice Ellsworth. My acquaintance with him was limited to the periods of our cotemporary services in public life, and to the occasional intercourse, incident to it. As we happened to be thrown but little into the familiar...
J. M. with his respects to Professor Rogers, returns many thanks for the Copy of his Report on the "Geological Reconnaissance of the State of Virginia." Unskilled as he is in the subject; he cannot but regard the Report as an able & instructive commencement of a task, which if duly prosecuted under the auspices it merits, cannot fail to amplify greatly the resources of the state, & to afford...
J. Madison with friendly salutations to Mr Southard thanks him for the copy of his speech on the 25th of Jany. In his present condition he can read but little. He has however borrowed from other claims on his attention, the time required for a perusal of the Speech. Whether regarded as a test of debating powers, or as a material for the political history of our Country, it is a Document, that...
James Madison having reason to believe, that in the Autograph lately furnished to Mr. Freeman, there was a lapsus of attention, in the reference to the year of his age, which instead of 84th. ought to have been 85th. which will soon be completed from the date of his birth in March 1751. Mr. Freeman will be so good as to alter the figure 4 into 5, after which this note may be destroyed. RC...
Your letter introducing the Earl of Selkirk was duly delivered and I soon found that his intelligence, and social merits—justified the reception asked for him. Mrs. Madison and myself cannot forego the occasion to thank you for the kind & friendly terms in which you express your sentiments towards us, & to assure you that there are affectionate reminiscences between the two families which will...
I beg leave to refer you to the foregoing statement of the organization of our Society, and of its objects; and also, respectfully to ask leave to present your name, at our first quarterly meeting, (on the first Monday in March,) as an Honorary Member. Yours, &c. RC and enclosures (DLC) . Enclosures are printed documents from the American Historical Society of Military and Naval Events.
I have received fellow Citizens, your letter inviting me to a public dinner, at Cincinnatti, on the 4th. of March, to celebrate the expiration on the preceding day, of the Charter of the U. S. Bank; and requesting from me, if unable to attend, an appropriate sentiment to be given in my name, by the Company. Retaining as I do, my convict<ion> heretofore officially, and otherwise expressed, that...
I have recd. your letter of the 6th. instant. The number relating to my religion addressed to me from diversified quarters, led me long ago to adopt the general rule of declining correspondences on the subject, the rule itself furnishing a convenient answer. I will not however withhold the expression of my sensibility to the friendly interest you take in my welfare here and hereafter; and your...
In attempting to write the Life of my Father in law, the late Chief Justice Ellsworth, I am under the necessity of resorting for materials to the small remnant yet with us, of that venerable band of Patriots and Statesmen who were colabourers with him in the organization of our Government—For that purpose I take the liberty to address you at this time—And were it not for the great distance...
In acknoledging the receipt of your letter of January 30. and thanking you for your kind wishes, which are sincerely returned, I comply with your request of an autographic line. Being written near the close of my 84th. year, with fingers crippled by Rheumatism, my name is added, as familarly written previous to the causes of the change. RC (owned by H. Spencer Glidden, Andover, Mass.); draft...
J. Madison has duly received the Copy of the President’s Message of the 8th. inst., enclosed by Mr. Van Buren and respectfully thanks him for the interesting communication. FC (DLC) .
Private I have just received your letter of Feby. 4th. The petition to Congress was returned with my signature two days ago. I think the postponement of the public invitation of plans for the Monument was very proper for the reasons you give. I doubt the expediency of the proposed application to the Legislature of Virginia without more knowledge than I have of its dispositions on the subject...
I have received your letter of the 3d. Instant, enclosing a copy of your speech on the right of petition &c; which certainly contains very able and interesting views of the subject. I do not wonder at your difficulty in understanding, the import, of the passage cited from my speech in the first Congress, under the present Constitution, being myself at a loss, for its precise meaning, obscured...
I feel extremely obliged to you for the polite manner in which you have been pleased to notice my letter. I will further add I was induced to address you on the subject as the President of the society, not thinking at the moment I was addressing one of the framers of the Constitution, although a moments reflection would have told me that was the case, which makes your silence on the subject...
Permit a friend & relative, though a stranger, to address you upon a subject deeply interesting to every child of Adam. Before entering upon it, I would remark as a part of my apology that I am by profession a minister of the Gospel of the Presbyterian Church, & a little allied to your family. My mother is a sister to Col. James Madison of Prince Edward now in the legislature, with whom I...
I am requested by the Board of Managers of the Washington National Monument Society to ask the favor of your signature, as President of the Society, to the accompanying memorial to the General Assembly of Virginia, if you should approve it; and to give it such aid as in your judgment may be proper, and as it may be convenient for you to give. Permit me, Sir, to congratulate myself upon the...
I had the honor, yesterday, to receive your favor of the 31st. ulto. enclosing a letter from Mr. McCleland of Balto. communicating his ideas respecting the Washington Monument, and shall lay it before the Board of Managers. At the meeting of the Board on the 3d. instant, a resolution was proposed to advertise for plans & estimates; but as we cannot yet form a correct idea of the amount of the...
I beg leave to present to you the accompanying speech, in which I have endeavored to maintain the right of petition, as it is recognised in the Constitution. It is not probable that I should have troubled the House with my views on the subject, but for my knowledge of the debates of 1790 in reference to a very similar occasion, and the reliance I placed on the opinion which you then expressed,...
The friends of free principles in the first Congressional district of Ohio in manifestation of their Joy for the emanicipation of their country from the thraldom of the United States Bank the charter of which expires on the 3d. March next have resolved to celebrate the following as the first day of the second great era of American Independance—And as well in high admiration of your Character...
Your long intimacy with Mr. Jefferson, your accordance with him in the principles of civil government, your cordial co-operation in carrying those principles into effect, and lastly, the kindness with which you have answered my inquiries and guided my researches, make it peculiarly proper that I should address to you the following pages. In submitting to you the biography of that friend of...
I enclose a letter from Mr. McCleland, of whom I have no knowledge, containing a plan for the Washington Monument. I have merely informed him that I should do so—with an intimation to address to you his further communications on the subject. It has I believe been the practice abroad in such cases to invite a competition from men of genius and taste. With my respects and cordial salutations FC...
I have received Sir your letter of Jany 23d. containing a plan for the proposed Washington Monument. When my appointment as President of the Society was made known to me, I intimated that my acceptance of it was merely as an evidence of the interest I felt in the object, and that in my present condition the appointment could be but honorary. This being every day more and more the case I shall...
I have received the copy of your address to the two branches of the Legislature, which I have read with much pleasure. It is what I should have taken for certain it would be, a very able document, and of a character appropriate to the occasion. I am not sure however, that I ought to congratulate you on the event, which led to the address, since it withdraws your services from a wider theatre,...
I return with thanks the papers you kindly favored me with an opportunity of perusing. They are not without interest tho’ superseded by the mass of information now before the public. I am sorry to find from this, that so much uncertainty still clouds the issue of the controversy with France. Should it fail of an amicable adjustment by the parties themselves, it is quite possible that Great...
Sir as the society for the purpose of raising a Monument (called the National Monument society and of which you are President) to the father of our country have set forth their views upon that subject and is their wish it should be commenced within a few months and finished in the course of eight or ten years and that their desire is it should be like him who it is meant it should commemorate...
J. Madison, with his best respects to Mr. Van Buren, thanks him for the Copy of the President’s late Special Message and the Documents accompanying it. He wishes he could have found in the posture of the controversy with France less of a remaining cloud over the desired issue to it. RC ( CLjC ); draft (DLC) .
William Allen is authorized to receive my share of the dividend lately declared by the Swift run gap Turnpike Company. FC (DLC) .
I received Sir in due time your letter of Septr.—with the Volume accompanying it. But such has been my decrepit condition, the effect of age, and chronic disease, that I have not been able to do more than dip occasionally into the work. This very partial view of its contents, has however satisfied me, that it affords information on curious & not uninteresting subjects, which spare to readers...
I have received a few days ago No. 36 of the Quarterly Review, the preceding no. 35 was omitted or miscarried—You will be so good as to forward that no. with respect. FC (DLC) .
I have received Sir your letter of Decr. 27th. requesting autograph names to repair the loss of a collection you had made for a gentleman of distinguished standing in the British Parliament. On recurring to my files, I find they have been so far exhausted by applications of a like sort, that I can promise from them no aid for your purpose. With respect FC (DLC) . Addressed to Fitzwilliams in "...
Sovereignty It has hitherto been understood, that the supreme power, that is, the sovereignty of the people of the States, was in its nature divisible; and was in fact divided, according to the Constitution of the U. States, between the States in their United, and the States in their individual capacities that as the States in their highest sov. char. were compent to a surrender of yr whole...
A sketch never finished nor applied. As the weakness and wants of man naturally lead to an association of individuals, under a Common Authority, whereby each may have the protection of the whole against danger from without, and enjoy in safety within, the advantages of social intercourse, and an exchange of the necessaries & comforts of life; in like manner feeble communities, independent of...
Altho’ the Legislature of Virginia at a late Session declared almost unanimously, that South Carolina was not supported in her doctrine of nullification by the Resolutions of 1798 it appears that those Resolutions are still appealed to as expressly or constructively favoring the doctrine. That the doctrine of nullification may be clearly understood, it must be taken as laid down in the Report...
I thank you, tho’ at a late day, for the pamphlet comprizing your address at New-York. The address is distinguished by some very interesting views of an important subject. The Absolutists on the "Let alone Theory" overlook the two essential prerequisites to a perfect freedom of external Commerce, 1. that it be universal among nations. 2. that peace be perpetual among them. A perfect freedom of...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Woodbury thanks him for his interesting Report from the Treasury Department. The exuberant prosperity of our Country is a happy illustration of the beneficent operation of its political Institutions; and with the anticipated rate of its growth in population, in productive capacities, and in resources for protection, not only on its borders, but on the Ocean,...
Though I regret that I have not the honor of knowing You personally, I trust you will excuse the liberty I now take in making you a request I collected with the greatest care & labour a curious collection of autographs for a gentleman of distinguished standing in the British Parliament who is passionately fond of the relics of men who have rendered themselves illustrious by their virtues...
I have received your letter of Decr. 22d. covering a communication from Mr. Hodges. Had you found it convenient to deliver it in person, it would have afforded me an agreeable opportunity of welcoming you to my abode. I very sincerely express my sensibility to the friendly views you have taken of my public Career—and I pray you to be assured of my cordial respects and good wishes. FC (DLC) .
I have this day drawn on you in favor of Walter S. Chandler for two hundred dollars which you will please to meet by a sale of as much flour as may be requisite. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. your letter of the 15th. with the Tobacco seed it refers to. I tender the thanks due respectively to Mr Vaughan and yourself for the obliging attention to which I am indebted; and will take measures for turning the seed to the best account. I was favored many years ago by Col. G. Mason with a sample of the like seed, and had hills enough planted from it to test its character in...
It would have given me great pleasure to have delivered the inclosed communication in person—but the gratification is denied to me— I beg you to be assured of the deep respect, and most enduring regard of one, who has always sustained your principles, and venerated your character Your most ob. Sert— FC (DLC) .
Until a few weeks ago, I counted with certainty on making my usual pilgrimage to Montpellier during this visit to the U. States. But circumstances beyond my control have put it out of my power, and I am now hastening to New Orleans, by the Way of Charleston, Augusta & Mobile, in company with Septimia Randolph, who has already suffered such effects from the cold weather as to make her friends...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Van Buren thanks him for the copy of the President’s message on the 7th. instant. It is a very able Document, and in some of its aspects particularly, interesting. The mode in which it disclaims any threats to France seems well adapted to the occasion. Its effect on the sensibilities of the French Executive, should these be involved in the sequel, may...
Since my arrival here I received from Mr Charles Vaughan of Hallowell, State of Maine, a paper of the finest kind of Cuba Tobacco Seed, which has been recently sent to him by a friend at the Havanna—and he desired me to distribute it in any way that I thought it could be most gratifying and useful—enjoining it upon me at the same time, that I should first present a portion of it to You as a...
I have your letter & am glad to find, that the information you request, will have probably reached you thro’ the Newspaper which contain it as notified from the authoritative source. I have only therefore to express my hopes, that your exertions on the occasion have the success they merit, & tender the respects I pray you to accept Draft (DLC) . Written on the same page with a draft of JM to...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr. Minor thanks him for his Address on "Education &c". before "The Institute of Education of Hampden Sidney College". He has read it with the pleasure which could not fail to be imparted, by the instructive and impressive views it takes of a subject vitally important to our popular Institutions. FC (DLC) .
I have recd. yours of the 27th. Ulti. Should the whole of my little stock of Coke Devon do well you can be furnished here in the spring with a pair. Should the Bull Calf fail, you can be accomodated at least, by temporary management that will give you the initiating service of a grown Bull. It is desirable, if convenient; that you should replace your lost female from another source; that being...
It gives me great pleasure to acknowledge your kind favour of this day, the payment of twenty doll : on your subscription to the Coll’g We hope not to fail in our present struggle, but still are quite liable to—Yours, Sir With the deepest Respect— RC (NjP) .
I received a few days ago under a blank cover a copy of Mr. Binney’s Eulogy on Chief Justice Marshall: a slip of paper being inserted; with the printed words "from the select and Common Councils of the City of Philadelphia". As the communication has the appearance of being somewhat circular, it may be a question whether an acknowledgment of the favour be, or be not due or expected. I wish not...
Your letter of Novr. 17. having been directed to Petersburg which is very distant from me, was not recd. till yesterday. I am sorry that I cannot give to it the answer that would be most agreeable. Unwilling as I am to obtrude my private affairs on others, the occasion requires me to say that for a number of years past the drafts of various denominations on my resources, have so far exceeded...