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Documents filtered by: Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 4101-4150 of 28,044 sorted by date (ascending)
At the request of Mr. R. Harrison, who is well acquainted with the Bearer Mr. James H. Hooe, I introduce this Gentleman to your civilities. He is charged with some business interesting to a friend of Mr. Harrison, which it is supposed may be aided by your advice, and perhaps claim your official attention. These considerations will more than apologize for the liberty I have taken, and will...
Before Mr. Monroe left America he desired me to write to you if I found it necessary. If you have his papers, or know where they are, I think some letters may be found among them which may be useful to the Suit in Chancery with J. Kortright. Old Mr. Kortright not long before he died, which was in February 84 —wrote to Mr. Monroe to settle for him his concern in lands at Smiths Clove with Judge...
I recd. yesterday your favor covering a letter to Monsr. Liancourt which I have put into the hands of Noailles who will attend to the delivery of it. I inclose a copy of the P’s speech. The Senate have answered it, as was to be expected. You will see the first fruits of their open doors in the debates it produced. The answer of the House of Reps. will be reported tomorrow. It has been delayed...
I received yesterday your favor covering a letter to Monsr. Liancourt which I have put into the hands of Noailles who will attend to the delivery of it. I inclose a copy of the P’s speech . The Senate have answered it, as was to be expected. You will see the first fruits of their open doors in the debates it produced. The answer of the House of Reps. will be reported tomorrow. It has been...
Letter not found. Ca. 16 December 1795. Mentioned in Jones to JM, 21 Dec. 1795 . Discusses the prospects of proceedings in the House of Representatives on the Jay treaty. Encloses Thomas Knox’s 12 Dec. letter to JM requesting papers concerning the estate of Lawrence Kortright.
Document not found. Ca. 18 December 1795. Presented by JM to the House of Representatives, 18 Dec. 1795. Reported in Philadelphia Gazette , 19 Dec. 1795.
I lately returned from my trip to Loudoun and Albemarle—what was doing in the Assembly I mentd. in my letter to you before I set out and you have seen the subsequent proceedings in the papers which is all I have seen or heard myself respecting the business I left them engaged in. In my way to Albemarle I called at Col. Madisons but he and his Lady were on a visit to Mr. Hites. The commencemt....
The last of your favors come to hand bears date Sepr. 8. 1795, of which a duplicate has also been received. The others which it may be proper to acknowledge or reacknowledge, are of Novr. 30th. 1794. which was opened at Halifax, & forwarded to me in that state. Decr. 18. 1794. covering a copy of one of same date to Mr. Randolph —Feby. 18. 1795. covering a copy of one of Feby. 12. to the same....
On my return a few days past I wrote you a letter and requested you wod. take the trouble to obtain from Mr. Beache and transmit me his acct. that I might inclose the amount to you or him in bank paper. I wish also to know whether he or myself according to his terms are liable for the postage. I was apprehensive from the vote of the House changing their Speaker the majority of that Body wod....
Letter not found. 24 December 1795, Richmond. A circular letter from Gov. Robert Brooke to Virginia’s delegation in the House of Representatives. Listed in Executive Letterbook (Vi). Encloses copies of the Virginia General Assembly’s joint resolutions proposing four constitutional amendments (possibly the printed version, In the House of Delegates, Saturday, December 12, 1795 … [(Richmond,...
Mr. R’s pamphlet is out & will be forwarded by the first oppy. Altho’ I have kept up an enquiry, I have not been able to collect the impression it makes. As it relates to the P. nothing seems to be said: and as it relates to parties in general very little. By Fenno’s & Webster’s papers, it appears that an effort will be used to run down Mr. R. & if necessary for the purpose to call in the...
I have delayed writing to you hitherto, on the supposition that you might not be returned from Frederick, as well as on acct. of a pressure of other writing on my hands. We had on the whole a convenient journey and arrived safe & in due time. All the articles sent by water have since got safe also, and will fully answer the purpose we had in view. To the articles sent from Orange, was added...
Mr. R’s pamphlet is out and will be forwarded by the first opportunity. Altho’ I have kept up an enquiry, I have not been able to collect the impression it makes. As it relates to the P. nothing seems to be said: and as it relates to parties in general very little. By Fenno’s and Webster’s papers, it appears that an effort will be used to run down Mr. R. and if necessary for the purpose to...
Smith (South Carolina) informed the House of the activities of Randall and Whitney and declared that Randall was probably in the custody of the city marshal. Other members then confirmed that they had been approached by the partners ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 1st sess., 166–67). Mr. Madison...
The inclosed Invo. being put into the hands of our G W Murray by Mr. Munroe with a request that we should forward the Cases to Philadelphia by first conveyance we have to inform you that in consequence of excessive bad weather it is to be feared that some of the Furniture is damaged, & therefore recommend to you to have the cases opened before we send them round, by an upholsterer; by which...
Randall had petitioned the House that he be allowed time to prepare his defense with the aid of counsel. Smith (South Carolina) moved that the petition be granted ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 1st sess., 179–80). Mr. Madison was in favor of allowing counsel—he thought the motion would stand...
The House debated a report from the Committee of Privileges, in substance as follows: that Randall be allowed to speak and present evidence in his own defense; that the judge of the District of Pennsylvania administer an oath or affirmation to witnesses; and that the sense of the House be taken on the guilt or innocence of the prisoners. Smith (South Carolina) objected to members having to...
Letter not found. 1796? . Described as a one-page letter about private matters in the lists probably made by Peter Force (DLC, series 7, container 2).
After several members had testified as to the nature of their conversations with Randall and Whitney, Blount (North Carolina) moved to put the question whether any conversation had passed between Smith (Maryland) and Randall which had “an appearance of intending to corrupt the integrity of members of this House” ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States...
5 January 1796. JM has sold to Theodorus Bailey and John B. Van Wyck his land known as lot number two of the Sedachqueda Patent in the Mohawk Valley of New York, amounting to approximately nine hundred acres, at $5.83⅓ per acre, for a total of $5,250. Bailey and Van Wyck have paid JM $4,000 and have given him a note for $1,250 payable on or before 1 Jan. 1797. The parties agree to have the...
Letter not found. 6 January 1796. Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 7 Feb. 1796 . Asks JM to edit for publication Pendleton’s essay on the carriage tax, which Pendleton has given to William Branch Giles.
Document not found. Ca. 7 January 1796. Presented by JM to the House of Representatives, 7 Jan. 1796, and referred to the Committee of Claims. Reported in Philadelphia Gazette , 8 Jan. 1796. Probably John Story (1762–1840), who served as a private in the Virginia First Light Dragoons ( DAR Patriot Index National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, DAR Patriot Index...
Giles (Virginia) moved that Whitney’s case be dismissed as it involved no breach of privilege. Smith (South Carolina) and several other members objected to Giles’s motion, claiming that Whitney’s conversations with a member of the House in Vermont (Daniel Buck) were as much a breach of privilege as if they had occurred in Philadelphia ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the...
The House of Representatives have been latterly occupied with a pretty curious affair. Certain Traders and others, of Detroit, entered into a contract with certain individuals of the United States, for obtaining the peninsula formed by Lakes Huron and Michigan, and containing 20 or 30 millions of acres of valuable land. The traders, by means of their influence over the Indians, were to...
The House of Representatives have been latterly occupied with a pretty curious affair . Certain Traders and others, of Detroit, entered into a contract with certain individuals of the United States, for obtaining the peninsula formed by Lakes Huron and Michigan, and containing 20 or 30 millions of acres of valuable land. The traders, by means of their influence over the Indians, were to...
We have to inclose you Cap John Wards bill [of] Lading of the furniture received ⅌ the Schooner Ariel as before advised you, the hatchway of this Vessel being so small obliged us to have one of the Cases made smaller. We annex you a list of the expences, which amt you will please remit us. We remain respectfully Your Obedt. Servts Drs 107.31/100 RC ( DLC ). Enclosures not found.
I am favourd with your letter of the 30th. of the last month. I have nothing to give you in return. There are at this place two British agents purchasing openly horses to take to the W. Indies. They get some & want many. Is this right? I hope to see you in the beginning of the next month. Make to Mrs. Madison & recieve yourself my best wishes! Yr. RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM. Letter not found....
Yours of the 6h. of April is the last I have received from you, though since that period I have written you eight or ten at least. The theatre too on which you are, has been and probably will continue to be an interesting one, for it is presumeable the same subject which creates such solicitude among the People at large, will produce a like effect among their representatives. Certain it is,...
The clerk read for the third time the bill establishing trading houses with the Indians. Salaries and penalties were fixed for the agents and the clerks, and $150,000 was proposed as the sum to be expended on goods ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 1st sess., 240). Mr. Madison after remarking that...
Letter not found. 13 January 1796. Acknowledged in Murray and Company to JM, 20 Jan. 1796 . Discusses payment of the expenses of importing furniture from France.
Smith (Maryland) moved that a Committee of the Whole consider his resolution, introduced on 4 January, that foreign vessels be restricted from bringing into the United States any goods, wares, or merchandise except those that were the produce, growth, or manufacture of the nation to which the vessels belonged. Hillhouse (Connecticut) recommended referring the resolution to the Committee of...
I Recd. yours soon after my arrival in Kentucky, informing me that you had acceeded to my proposition in settleing with Majr Moore. Your Land on Sandy was surveyed by direction of Majr Lee previous to my return, it Joins as I am told a tract of John Greens. If so, it may be of more value than was apprehended, as there is a valuable Salt lick on the Land claimed by Green. It is also said that...
I have not had the pleasure of a line from you since we left Orange. A letter from Fanny is the only information we have received. Inclosed is a small pamphlet containing the proceedings of the H. of Reps. in the case of two adventurers in the line of Bribery. This is the only business of consequence that has latterly occupied us. The Treaty has not yet been laid before Congs., & it seems is...
I have been absent a fortnight on a visit to Albemarle—while there I went over all the papers and could find nothing among them answering the expectation of Mr. Knox and yet I think Monroe had some communications from the old Gent. himself or one of his Daughters to the purport of what Mr. Knox supposes he possessed. There were many papers and some statemts of Monroes respecting this business...
In the Committee of the Whole debate on the civil list for 1796, Williams (New York) moved to strike out the appropriation for officers of the Mint. Failing to persuade other members, he then limited his resolution to the appropriation for purchasing copper for the Mint ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th...
I think I mentioned to you sometime since that Mr. Paine was with me. Upon my arrival I found him in prison, & as soon as I saw my application in his behalf would be attended to, I asked his release & obtained it. But he was in extreme ill health, without resource, & (affrs. being unsettled) not without apprehensions of personal danger, & therefore anxious to avail himself as much as possible...
Yours of 13th. Inst reached us in course & this day Edwd Livingstons Dft on Mr. Livingston was paid 107 31/100 Dollars to your Credit, being the amt of sundry expences attending the importation of the Two Cases furniture from Havre de Grace. We remain respectfully Your Obedt. Servts. RC ( DLC ).
The House continued the debate of 19 January on striking out the appropriation for the Mint. Livingston (New York) had moved that pensions for officers of the Mint be excepted from the resolution ( Annals of Congress Debates and Proceedings in the Congress of the United States … (42 vols.; Washington, 1834–56). , 4th Cong., 1st sess., 262–63). Mr. Madison wished that the articles could be...
The enclosed letters, with the additional explanation that follows, will bring the case of young Fayette fully to your view. From the receipt of Mr Cabots letter until the latter end of Octr, I had not heard from, or of the young Gentleman. Then, a letter from Colo. Hamilton, to whom as you will see by Mr Cabots letter he had been introduced, informed me that he and his Tutor were in a retired...
The enclosed letters, with the additional explanation that follows, will bring the case of young Fayette fully to your view. From the receipt of Mr. Cabots letter until the latter end of Octr, I had not heard from, or of the young Gentleman. Then, a letter from Colo. Hamilton, to whom as you will see by Mr. Cabots letter he had been introduced, informed me that he and his Tutor were in a...
Letter not found. 23 January 1796. Mentioned in JM to James Madison, Sr., 21 Feb. 1796 , and in Francis Taylor Diary (Vi). Concerns Taylor’s claim for Revolutionary service and encloses a memorial to Congress.
Allow me to give you the trouble to deliver the inclosed to the President of the U. States and I confide in you to give him such an explanation as may be necessary. The purport of the communication is that I have offered my services with a Corps of Voluntiers to aid in taking possession of the Western Posts next Summer. I know Regulars are usually prefer’d for such service, but why not...
Letter not found. 24 January 1796. Acknowledged in JM to Jefferson, 7 Feb. 1796 ; mentioned in Jefferson’s Epistolary Record (DLC: Jefferson Papers) and in JM to Jefferson, 10 Apr. 1824 (DLC). Acknowledges JM’s letters of 27 Dec. 1795 and 10 Jan. 1796 . Asks JM to make some inquiries in Philadelphia, to inform Jefferson weekly of governmental proceedings, and to send certain pamphlets....
The articles sent to Havre, came as you anticipated, in the same vessel with Mr. Murray, to N. York, from whence they have safely arrived here. They lay us under very great obligations to your kindness, and are the more valuable, as we venture to consider them as bearing the sanction of Mrs. Monroe’s taste as well as yours. The carpets, in particular, are truly important acquisitions. In the...
Since my last I have had the pleasure of your two favors of Ocr. 23 & 24. The business of the Treaty with G. B. remains as it stood. A copy of the British ratification has arrived; but the Executive wait, it seems, for the original as alone proper for communication. In the mean time, altho’ it is probable that the house if brought to say yea or nay directly on the merits of the treaty will...
I ought perhaps to apologize to You for the liberty I take and have taken. But in a matter so highly interesting to my personal character—I have venturd to obtrude myself—I fear abruptly, upon your valuable hours—desirous to be indulged in consulting you upon this occasion both as a man of honor and a republican statesman. For however confident I am of the merits of my claim I shall disdain to...
It is with pain I find myself constrained to trouble you on the present occasion. Nor should I now do it, but from a reluctance to petition the House. This I have already done twice unsuccessfully, and I should suppose the chance of succeeding, at this moment, in that mode, still less favorable than hitherto. But, sir, I conceive there never has been a time furnishing more real cause for...
I inclose a letter from Jno. Bringhurst explaining a claim on you for about £17. Pa. Currency, and requesting me to advance it. Taking him to be an honest man in distress, I shall probably venture a compliance with his solicitation, if it should be found that he cannot wait for your orders. In the mean time you can inform me whether the acct. be accurately stated: but if so, you need not...
I inclose a letter from Jno. Bringhurst explaining a claim on you for about £17. Pa. Currency, and requesting me to advance it. Taking him to be an honest man in distress, I shall probably venture a compliance with his solicitation, if it should be found that he cannot wait for your orders. In the mean time you can inform me whether the account be accurately stated: but if so, you need not...
Pardon the liberty I take of sending my petition to you with whom I have never had the pleasure of a personal Acquaintance: In you I have ever found the friend of the People, one whom as long as we Keep propriety on our side, I am convinced from your past conduct will be our sincere friend. I know that it should have been delivered to Mr Wm Smith our Representative, but his well known...