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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Randolph, Edmund" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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Letter not found. 23 April 1801. Mentioned in Randolph to JM, 29 June 1801 . Queries Randolph on his reference to inheritance case of Hoomes v. Hoomes .
Letter not found. 25 March 1801. Mentioned in Randolph to JM, 29 June 1801 . Asks Randolph a series of legal questions concerning settlement of father’s estate.
“Your favor of the 12 Ult. having arrived during an excurtion into Albemarle, I did not receive it till my return on yesterday. I lose not a moment in thanking you for it; particularly for the very friendly par[a]graph in the publication in Fenno’s paper. As I do not get his paper here, it was by accident I first saw this extradiordinary manœuvre of Calumy; the quarter, the motive, and the...
The President has been critically ill for some days past, but is now we hope out of danger. His complaint is a peripneumony, united probably with the Influenza. Since my last I have found that I did not go too far in intimating that the cause of your delay would forbid the smallest criticism on it. I earnestly pray that you may no longer have occasion to plead that apology. In consequence of a...
Your’s of Apl. 27. is this instant put into my hand. I have written to you all the letters that were promised, and have forborne to write others, because the cessation of yours led me to conclude that you had set out for N. Y. I am extremely sorry to find that this was not the case, but cheifly, on acct. of the cause of your delay. I can not suppose that under your circumstances any criticism...
Your favr. of the 15. which requests an immediate acknowledgment, by some irregularity did not come to hand till I had recd. that of the 18, nor till it was too late to comply with the request by the last mail. I have been so unlucky also as to miss seeing the President twice that I have waited on him in order to intimate the circumstances which you wish him to know. I shall continue to repeat...
Your favor of the 10th. came to hand yesterday. I feel much anxiety for the situation in which you found Mrs. Randolph; but it is somewhat alleviated by the hopes which you seem to indulge. The Language of Richmond on the proposed discrimination does not surprize me. It is the natural language of the towns, and decides nothing. Censure I well knew would flow from those sources. Should it also...
I have recd. the few lines you dropped me from Baltimore, and daily expect those promised from Fredg. I am made somewhat anxious on the latter point, by the indisposition under which you were travelling. The question depending at your departure was negatived by a very large majority, though less than stated in the Newspapers. The causes of this disproportion which exceeds greatly the estimate...
For a week past the subject of amendts. has exclusively occupied the H. of Reps. Its progress has been exceedingly wearisome not only on account of the diversity of opinions that was to be apprehended, but of the apparent views of some to defeat by delaying a plan short of their wishes, but likely to satisfy a great part of their companions in opposition throughout the Union. It has been...
I have been favd. with yours of the 30 Ult. and thank you for your remarks on the Judiciary bill. I am glad to find you concurring in the decision as to the power of removal. It seems to meet with general approbation North of Virga. and there too as far as I yet learn. Mr. Pendleton is fully in opinion with you. So is Monroe I am told . The more the question is weighed the more proper I think...
My last stated a question relating to the power of removal from offices then on the anvil of the H. of Rs. I now inclose the discussions as conveyed to the public thro’ the Newspapers. It is not necessary to apprize you that the reasonings on both sides are mutilated, often misapprehended, and not unfrequently reversed. You will perceive yourself that much of the reasoning is also founded on a...
The inclosed bill relating to the Judiciary has been just introduced into the Senate. Having not yet looked it over I can say nothing of its merits. You will be a better judge, and such remarks as your leisure will permit, will be acceptable & useful. A very interesting Question is started—By whom officers appointed during pleasure by the Presidt. & Senate are to be displaced?—whether the...
The inclosed paper contains the proposition made on Monday last on the subject of amendments. It is limited to points which are important in the eyes of many and can be objectionable in those of none. The structure & stamina of the Govt. are as little touched as possible. Nothing of a controvertible nature can be expected to make its way thro’ the caprice & discord of opinions which would...
I have been favored with yours of the 19th. instant and thank you for the answer to Mr. St. John’s enquiries. The apprehensions of Mrs. Randolph give me unfeigned concern, but I indulge strong hopes that they proceed from an imaginary cause. There are so many symptoms which mimic the cancerous that it would be wrong to suffer appearances to prevail against the favorable chances. At the same...
Whilst I thank you for your favr of the 23d. Ult: I must remind you that it does not contain the promised information on the Case of the French Consul here. I am led to it by being myself just reminded by him of the omission on my part. The plan of an immediate temporary impost was what first occurred on the subject. It is not yet abandoned, but the practicability is questionable. The plan of...
I am just favored with yours of the 27. Ulto. My last was sent from Alexandria, and as the receipt of it is not mentioned, I fear that it may have miscarried. I have not sooner written from this place, because I waited for an opportunity of collecting the features & complexion of the new Government, which in its legislative capacity never became practically organized till the 6th. instant; and...
This is the first convenient opportunity I have had for dropping you a line since I last came into the State. Your sanction to my remaining in N. York during the crisis of the elections, conveyed through Col: Carrington, never came to hand till I had arrived in Orange. It coincided so fully with my inclination, and indeed with my judgment, that had it been received in due time, I do not know,...
Your two favors of the 5th. & 10th instant have been duly recd. The appointments for the Senate communicated in the latter, answer to the calculations I had formed, notwithstanding the contrary appearances on which the former was founded. My only surprize is that in the present temper and disproportionate number of the antifederal part of the Assembly, my name should have been honored with so...
I recd. yesterday your favor of the 23d. Ult. The first countenance of the Assembly corresponds with the picture which my imagination had formed of it. The views of the greater part of the opposition to the fœderal Government, and particularly of its principal leader, have ever since the Convention, been regarded by me as permanently hostile, and likely to produce every effort that might...
I inclose herewith two pamphlets on the questions agitated in France. They are written by the Marquis Condorcet, and contain more correct information than has been communicated to the public through any other channel. I inclose also a Gazette containing observations on Manufactures by our acquaintance Mr. T. Coxe. You will probably think them worth handing to the Printer for republication....
Inclosed are 4 letters from Mazzei & one from Mr. Jefferson which you will be good eno’ to dispose of. I have a letter from the former in which he begs me to add my importunities to you & Mr. Blair, for speedy succour if possible. I have one also from the latter, but it contains nothing of much consequence. His public letters to which it refers have not yet been communicated from the Office of...
I have been favd. with yours of the 12th. instant. The picture it gives of the state of our Country is the more distressing as it seems to exceed all the known resources for immediate relief. Nothing in my opinion can give the desired facility to the discharge of debts, but a reestablishment of that confidence which will at once make the creditor more patient, and open to the solvent debtor...
Your favor of the 3d. instant would have been acknowledged two days ago, but for the approaching completion of the arrangement for the new Govt. which I wished to give you the earliest notice of. This subject has long employed Congs. and has in its progress assumed a variety of shapes, some of them not a little perplexing. The times as finally settled are Jany. for the choice of Electors,...
I have your favor of the 13th. The effect of Clintons circular letter in Virga. does not surprize me. It is a signal of concord & hope to the enemies of the Constitution every where, and will I fear prove extremely dangerous. Notwithstanding your remarks on the subject I cannot but think that an early convention will be an unadvised measure. It will evidently be the offspring of party &...
The length of the interval since my last has proceeded from a daily expectation of being able to communicate the arrangements for introducing the New Government. The times necessary to be fixt by Congress have been many days agreed on. The place of meeting has undergone many vicisitudes and is still as uncertain as ever. Philada. was first named by a member from Connecticut, and was negatived...
The inclosed papers will give you a view of the business in the Convention at Poughkepsie. It is not as yet certain that the ratification will take any final shape that can make New York immediately a member of the new Union. The opponents can not come to that point without yielding a compleat victory to the federalists, which must be a severe sacrifice of their pride. It is supposed too that...
The inclosed papers will give you the latest intelligence from Poughkepsie. It seems by no means certain what the result there will be. Some of the most sanguine calculate on a ratification. The best informed apprehend some clog that will amount to a condition. The question is made peculiarly interesting in this place, by its connexion with the question relative to the place to be recommended...
Some of the letters herewith inclosed have been here for some time without my knowing it. The others came to hand yesterday. I have also in hand for you the Marquis Condorcet’s essai on the probability of decisions resulting from plurality of voices, which I understand from Mazzei is a gift from the Author. I shall forward it by the first conveyance. There are public letters just arrived from...
Since I got home which was on the day preceding our election, I have received your favor of the 29th. of Feby. which did not reach New York before I had left it. I view the amendments of Massachussetts pretty nearly in the same light that you do. They were meant for the people at large, not for the minority in the Convention. The latter were not affected by them; their objections being...
The Convention of N. Hampshire have disappointed the general expectation. They have not rejected the Constitution, but they have adjourned without adopting it. It was found that on a final question there would be a majority of 3 or 4 in the negative but in this number were included some who with instructions from their Towns against the Constitution, had been proselyted by the discussions....