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  • Author

    • Toulmin, Harry
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
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    • Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Toulmin, Harry" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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Placed as you are in the highest station to which the good sense of a republican nation can elevate an individual; fully occupied, no doubt, if not burthened with concerns highly interesting to a large portion of the globe; I have felt reluctant to intrude myself and my own little circle on your attention. And although from the peculiar local position of this settlement, surrounded by indians,...
I have just been honoured with your favour of Septr. 5th. which has been so long on the road in consequence of its going round by way of Natchez. I am gratified to find that my communication to you was acceptable, and still more so to be able to repeat my assurances that the expedition is at an end. One of the leading partizans takes to himself the merit of having induced the government to...
… of some troops for this place: but I know not on what foundation. If only two or three hundred men came; I think it highly probable that several from our settlement would join them: but I have no great apprehension that any body of men will go from this place alone , to attack Mobile. Lawyer Kennedy a Major of the militia seems indeed very solicitous to impress the idea, that as the...
22 November 1810, Fort Stoddert. Writes again to inform JM of “the situation of this country in the present critical state of affairs” as he fears that certain American citizens will do “some rash act … highly injurious to the cause of peace and good order.” The population of the district is divided into three settlements. In the settlement near and above St. Stephens there is “little or no...
28 November 1810, Fort Stoddert. “The situation of our country here [which] becomes every day so truly critical … will excuse me, I hope, if I should even communicate to you more frequently or more fully than may be deemed absolutely necessary.” Has no doubt that “the alarm excited in the summer, induced the government to take the best measures” possible, but the “judicial arm is (for the want...
6 December 1810, Fort Stoddert. Reports that there is no sign of any force from Baton Rouge. “The party which assembled from this district, have moved down to a bluff nearly opposite to the town of Mobile.… Governor Folch attempted to cross the bay with a force to disperse them; but a storm arose, and he was compelled to return. They have occasioned a general terror to the inhabitants.… Their...
12 December 1810, Fort Stoddert. Reports issuing arrest warrants for Dr. Pollard and others engaged in illegal military enterprises. “Previous to the return of the Sheriff; the inclosed application for a writ of Habeas Corpus was made to me by Lawyer Kennedy, which I send because it exhibits the legal talents of the petitioner, & because … it has afforded ground for a clamour that I had denied...
When I last took the liberty of addressing you, I was engaged I believe in the examination of Reuben Kemper and John Callier. Col. Kennedy of the conventional army had been arrested and held to bail, and had thereupon applied to me for a writ of habeas corpus , to bring up the recognizance ; in consequence of which I stand charged before the public of denying to a freeman the sacred writ of...
As I have observed in the instructions from the Secretary of State to Govr. Claiborne, which have lately reached this Country; that weekly communications from him were expected relative to the State of things in West Florida; I feel less apprehensive of being considered as guilty of intrusion, in the frequent reports which I have thought it proper to trouble you with, relating to events more...
6 February 1811, Fort Stoddert. Writes that “nothing material has occurred” since his last letter other than the failure of the judge sent by Claiborne to establish civil government in the settlement on the Pascagoula River. Quotes from a 27 Jan. letter written to him by Judge Cumming describing “‘the state of anarchy and confusion’” on the Pascagoula and the refusal of Dupree to permit the...