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  • Author

    • Tompkins, Daniel D.
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
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    • Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Tompkins, Daniel D." AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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11 July 1812, Albany. Bears “unqualified testimony” in favor of Samuel Russell of New York, who will be recommended to the president for the office of deputy commissary general. Printed copy (Hugh Hastings, ed., Public Papers of Daniel D. Tompkins, Governor of New York, 1807–1817: Military [3 vols.; New York and Albany, 1898–1902], 3:25–26). On 9 Nov. 1812 JM nominated Samuel Russell to be...
22 December 1812, Albany. “The peculiarity of the case of Mr David S. Wendell of Troy, for whom I am desirous of obtaining a Commission of Lieutenant in the Army, is my apology for troubling you with this recommendation.” “He was orderly Sergeant of the ‘Invincibles,’ an Independent uniform Company of Militia in the Village of Troy,” which Tompkins sent “to the Northern Frontier” in September....
24 December 1812, Albany. Brings to JM’s attention Capt. John E. Wool of the Thirteenth Infantry Regiment, who was “Commandant on Queenstown heights for a part of the 13th of October & lead the party which attacked and carried the British works on the high ground in which he received a wound.” Is informed by Van Rensselaer and others of Wool’s good conduct and gallantry during that engagement;...
It is with pain I have to inform you that the state of things on the Niagara frontier of this State is truly distressing. An express, who arrived last evening, brought intelligence of the destruction of the village of Buffalo, which was preceeded by the capture of Fort Niagara, with its immense stores, by the burning of Lewiston, Manchester, (Schlosser) & all the buildings near the Niagara...
§ From Daniel D. Tompkins. 30 March 1814, Albany. “Col. Anthony Lamb of this City, late Deputy Quarter Master General, has informed me of his intention of visiting Washington upon business transacted by him whilst in the Quarter Master’s department. He is desirous of the honor of being made known to you. I therefore pray you to pardon the liberty I take in presenting Col. Lamb to your...
§ From Daniel D. Tompkins. 6 April 1814, Albany. “Mr. Horatio G. Spafford of this city, and author of the Gazetteer of Newyork, expects to visit Washington on some business which he deems interesting to him. I pray you to pardon the liberty I take in giving him this letter of introduction.” RC ( DLC ). 1 p. Spafford evidently intended to discuss with JM the possibility of obtaining a special...
General Mapes and Mr. T. R. Smith, two of the aldermen of this city, have been deputed by the Corporation on business relating to the defence of this city & harbour; and I beg leave to introduce them to you as respectable & patriotic characters in whom the utmost confidence may be reposed. With perfect respect & esteem, I am, Sir, Your Ob St RC ( DNA : RG 107, LRRS , T-81:8). Docketed as...
§ From Daniel D. Tompkins. 4 September 1814, New York. “Aldermen King and Brackett, of this city are deputed by the corporation to visit the City of Washington on important public business. I beg leave to introduce them to you as gentlemen of respectability & entitled to confidence; and to solicit your Kindness in facilitating the objects of their mission.” RC ( DNA : RG 107, LRRS , B-126:8)....
Your letter of the 28th. of September was received by me last evening. I have reflected, in the short interval, upon the course which duty to my family and to my Country required me to pursue in relation to your obliging offer; and have concluded to decline the acceptance of the department of state. A variety of public and private considerations have produced this determination. These...
I beg leave to detail more fully than in my letter of friday the reasons which prevented my acceptance of the honor of being named to the senate for secretary of state. The private reasons are numerous. The number and state of health of my family render it improper for me to be absent from them any length of time; and my circumstances would not justify me to move them to Newyork or Washington....