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  • Author

    • Gerry, Elbridge
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    • Madison, James
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    • Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Gerry, Elbridge" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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I am honored, dear Sir, by your letter of the 14th. instant in answer to mine of the 20th of february, stating, that “tho you do not enter into the aptitude of all my observations, you perceive in them a very interesting veiw of our public affairs.” Since the adoption of those measures, the relaxation of Government, in regard to the embargo, has happily changed the phrenzy, excited by the last...
I have heard, Dear Sir, with no small surprize, that charges have been preferred against Doctor Waterhouse, for misconduct as physician of the U. S. marine hospital at Charleston. I have been intimately acquainted with the Doctor for thirty years, so far at least as to have been able to form for myself, a correct opinion, which has ever been a respectful one, of his moral, political, &...
From some circumstances which have come to my knowledge, I am induced to think, that measures are adopted to shake the confidence of Government, in their district attorney, George Blake Esqr. If so, the grounds are said to be, his having had in his office, a brother, & his having associated with native & foreign gentlemen, of different politicks . I regret exceedingly, that reports of this...
The death of Judge Cushing, having produced a vacancy which must soon be filled, the general expectation in this quarter, I find is, that George Blake Esqr will be his successor. It is grounded, On the professional character of that Gentleman, which is supposed to be paramount to that of any person in this State, who can be a candidate for that office; On ten years practice in the federal...
On the 22d of Sepr last, I had the honor of addressing you a letter, on the subject of a candidate to supply the vacancy, caused by the death of Judge Cushing; & also of one for the office of district attorney, if that should be vacant by the promotion of the present incumbent. Being then in haste, I had omitted to mention, that my Son in law, by the appointment of Governor Sullivan, had...
I have read your message, with great attention & pleasure. It is clear, candid, firm & dignified, & cannot fail of convincing G Britain, that your object is just, your demands are reasonable, & that you will support them at all events. In this resolution, you will unite the eastern part of the nation; except british subjects, traders & partizans, who in case of a conflict, would soon...
The late President Adams communicated to me yesterday, in a friendly interveiw at my house, the enclosed extract of a letter; & expressed great apprehension, that if all the propositions, for enforcing the non intercourse act, should be adopted, they will overthrow the republican governments of the New England States & make them compleatly federal. The searching houses, as proposed before the...
I addressed a line to you yesterday on a minor subject; at this time, my mind is intent on a very important point. It has been confidentially communicated to me, that there are two revolutionary officers on the list of candidates for the office of Commander in chief of the national Army; Governor Hull & General Brooks. Governor Hull & General Dearbo[r]n were in my mind the most prominent...
31 December 1811, Boston Council Chamber. Introduces Richard Devens Harris—“a young Gentleman of this place & of one of the most respectable families in it, of a liberal education, & of correct morals & politicks”—who wishes to pay his respects. “Mr Harris having spent two or three years at London, Paris &c has obtained much useful information; which qualifies him to serve his Country in many...
The Count de Crillon, son of the celebrated Duke, who beseiged Gibralter, & was famous as a great mi[li]tary character, arrived here a day or two past, & proposes to go on to Washington. He came from England in company with Captain Henry, formerly of our army; whom you probably know, is also a great military character, & in every point, truly respectable. He wishes to pay his personal respects...