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  • Author

    • Armstrong, John
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    • Madison, James
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    • Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Armstrong, John" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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We are often as much injured by our friends, in this world, as by our enemeies [ sic ]. The circumstance that immediately occasions this remark, is the effect produced here by the Speech of M. Whitbread, (who is, no doubt, well disposed towards the U. S.) no less than by that of M. Canning, who, as certainly, has no great partiality for us. The one, (as you know), declared, that we had made an...
I write this letter under feelings the most unpleasant. You will have seen by my public correspondence, that on the 26th. Ult. I was induced to write a letter to M. Champagny, contradicting the reports which were circulating here of an alledged adjustment of our differences with G. B. and that I had been principally induced to take this step by the silence of M. Pinkney. The journals of to-day...
The journals of yesterday gave us your proclamation announcing an arrangement with the British Minister at Washington. Those of to-day give us M. Canning’s disavowal of that minister’s conduct, and would make us believe that M. Erskine had gone in the very face of his instructions. There is nothing astonishing in all this. It is a true specimen of modern diplomacy. New hopes from Austria—from...
This will be handed to you by Jos. Tate who, after an absence of fifteen years, returns to the U. S. heartily sick of all he has seen abroad. His story may not be unknown to you, and is less recommendatory than his character. In the five years I have been in Paris, tho’ oppressed by poverty and injustice, his conduct has at all times been regular and respectable. He was the Acquaintance of M....
A letter from the Emperor of the 9th instant Says, “I shall soon be at Paris and shall bring with me a beautiful female, called Peda. I am much satisfied with what has been done in Germany, and as to Poland, there is a perfect understanding between us and Russia.” Of the terms which have been either offered or accepted, on this occasion, we know nothing certainly, but rumor says, that Napoleon...
I enclose a note just received from Lafayette which confirms my belief in the interest M. F. takes in our business. Lafayette is not in the secret of the invitation stated in my letter of the 18: but his friend appears to be privy to the wishes and intentions of the Minister. I am very truly your most respectful & obedient humble servt RC ( DNA : RG 59, Diplomatic Despatches, France)....
I send by M. Auriol the post-[s]cript, of which I spoke in my last. It will reach it’s destination, but without any hope of it’s working the necessary conversion. Indeed I now consider this as impossible, for to public Error, is now added the whole wieght of private interest. So long as the rule lasts, a single exception to it, makes the fortunes of two or three new men, who are about starting...
In the haste in which I now write, I can do no more than acknowlege the receit of your letter by M. fenwick, and renew my request, that a ship of some kind be sent for me so as to reach France, & the port of Havre if possible, from the 1st. to the 15 of April next. As London is the theatre of the preliminary Negociation on foot between France & England, Mr. Pinkney will keep you advised of...
This will be handed to you by Count Pahlen who goes out as I beleive with every disposition to please and be pleased. He is a respectable young man. If report says true, (for I know nothing of it officially) you will soon have a new Minister from this country. This is a Diaplomatic Cadet, who is for the first time put on horseback. He is the son in law of your old acquaintance Laforest, and...
I have just been informed that M. Bowdoin (before he left Paris) in conjunction with M. Skipwith & by means which I shall take care to investigate, did obtain from an Irish ex-priest of the name of Somers a deposition, in which an attempt is made to implicate me in a land Speculation, connected with the then intended purchase of the Floridas, and conducted by Mess. Parker, OMealy and le Ray de...