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Documents filtered by: Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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In mine of Nov. 11. I acknoleged the receipt of yours of Aug. 20. Sep. 7. & 15. Since that, the one of Oct. 11. by the packet has come to hand as also that of July 3. by mr Short who came in the packet, was actually in N. York when you passed through it & had waited there several days in hopes of seeing you. I thank you very much for the relation of the proceedings of assembly. It is the most...
After the notification of my disgrace which reached me about the 20th. Novr. I hastened from N York & pressed forward to my home. Every difficulty of weather and roads opposed my progress and retarded us effectually, for it took us three weeks to reach this place which I had reckoned on accomplishing in twelve days. At Length we arrived on the banks of potomac, and thro our avidity to embrace...
Seven o’clock, and retired to my fireside, I have determined to enter into conversation with you; this is a village of about 5000 inhabitants, when the court is not here and 20,000 when they are, occupying a valley thro’ which runs a brook, and on each side of it a ridge of small mountains most of which are naked rock. The king comes here, in the fall always, to hunt. His court attend him, as...
I have recd. your favor of the 9th. inclosing a paper from Mr. Triplet. The case is stated so imperfectly that it is impossible for me to take any step for bringing it before Congress, if that should be proper. Mr. R. Morris I am told will be here soon, and I shall endeavour then to supply the omitted circumstances. In the meantime Mr. Triplet may either make out a fuller statement & forward...
I did not learn till just now that you lodged in Town last night or I should have taken the liberty to have requested you to have called down, My brothers indisposition confining me almost entirely to his bed chambre. Col. Ballard formerly of your State is desirous of seeing you. He will have some business with Congress in which your good opinion may be of infinite service to him. He is...
My Friend Mr. Thomas Pleasants read to me a Paragraph in a letter he wrote you, recommending me, shoud the New Government be adopted & consequent commercial arrangements take place, as a Candidate for the Consulship to the Kingdom of Portugal, at same time solliciting your interest wth. General Washington in my behalf; he also shewd me your answer. A Severe & tedious indisposition prevented me...
Letter not found. 11 November 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Lee of 23 November 1786 . Concerned Lee’s sense of injury at being dropped by the Virginia legislature from the state delegation to Congress, and the “deriliction of the friendship” between JM and Lee because of JM’s being elected, so Lee thought, in his place ( Lee to JM, 20 Dec. 1786 ).
Never was there an Assembly in this State in possession of greater ability & information than the present Convention—yet I am in doubt whether they will approve the Constitution. There is unhappily three parties opposed to it. First all Men who are in favour of paper money and tender Laws—those are more or less in every part of the State. Secondly all the late Insurgents and their abettors; &...
Letter not found. 19 November 1786. The calendar of Pendleton’s letters (DLC: Madison Miscellany) apparently prepared by a clerk for Peter Force around 1850 cites this letter. The annotations indicate the one-page letter included comments on the attempted reform of the county court system and “Congratulations on reappointment to Congress.” Enclosed was a draft of a bill for amending the county...
I am much obliged to you for your communication of the proceedings of the Convention, since I left them; for I feel that anxiety about the result, which it’s Importance must give to every honest citizen. If I thought that my return could contribute in the smallest degree to it’s Improvement, nothing should keep me away. But as I know that the talents, knowledge, & well-establish’d character,...
Letter not found. 29 January 1788, Edmundsbury. On the docket of JM to Pendleton, 28 Oct. 1787 , Pendleton noted: “Answd. Jan. 29—88.” Acknowledged in JM to Pendleton, 21 Feb. 1788 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) also indicates that Pendleton wrote a two-page letter to JM from Edmundsbury on this day. The summary reads: “The reception of the proposed...
No question has been yet taken by which the strength of parties can be determined. The calculations on different sides do not accord; each making them under the bias of their particular wishes. I think however the friends of the Constitution are most confident of superiority; and am inclined myself to think they have at this time the advantage of 3 or 4 or possibly more in point of number. The...
I have recieved your favor of the 29. May acknowledging the receipt of my first letter, though making no mention of the last, which I presume has not yet come to hand. Since the date thereof the affair of the treaty with the Western Indians which was decided on the 18th. March last, has been opened again & very much canvassed; the result however is that the treaty is to be held; & for the...
Letter not found. 28 April 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter to Monroe, 13 May 1786 , and Monroe’s letter to JM, 18 May 1786 . Related to the speculation in which Monroe purchased land in the Mohawk Valley for JM and himself. Monroe expressed an interest in taking a journey with JM to see the lands, and discussed odd appearance of two conventions sitting simultaneously with similar powers to...
I enclose a copy of the journals so far as they are printed. They contain nothing you will find respecting the requisition nor the commercial interests of the Union. The former upon the report of a committee hath been frequently before Congress of late and as often recommitted, in which state it now lies. As the principal part of the debt which in other States forms a part of the present...
Yesterday, My Dear Sir, The Convention made a house. That day and this have been spent in preliminary arrangements. Tomorrow we go into a Committee of the whole on the Constitution. There is every appearance that a full discussion will take place, which will keep us together at least a fortnight. It is not easy to conjecture what will be the result. Our adversaries greatly outnumber us. The...
Mr. Henry has this Day brought in his firebrand which I fear we can scarcely withstand. Tomorrow— tis a fearfull day . Corbin has today almost given up the cause of federalism. Richd Bland Lee—Mr. Z. Johnson & myself—opposed to the formidable band of Antifederals who were most conspicuous in the Convention. “Whereas (say the Resolutions) the Convention of Delegates of the People of Virginia...
I was honord a few days ago by your favor of the 27th. May for which accept my thanks. It gives me no small concern to find that the People of Kentucky are not to expect your Assistance in the important Business of framing a Constitution which they have so shortly in View. At the time I took the liberty to trouble you with the request I was well aware of the multiplicity of your engagements,...
On my way to this place I met a Man from the Settlement on Cumberland River in North Carolina who had just come in by the way of Kentuckey. He informs that the minds of all the Western People are agitated on Account of the proposed cession of the Mississippi Navigation to Spain. Every person talks of it with i[n]d[i]gnation and reprobates it as a Measure of the greatest Injustice and Despotism...
Your favor of the 9th. reach’d me a few days since. Mine by the last post advis’d you of my arrival here; still I am with out a colleague and the representation of the States, the same. I am perfectly satisfied that the more fully the subject is investigated, and the better the interests of the States severally are understood, the more obvious will appear the necessity of commiting to the U S....
Whenever I ask your aid to the promotion of the wishes of my friend, receive it on this express condition, that the public good must combine with the views of the gentlemen recommended. Very happy in the appointent [ sic ] of my old fellow soldier Lindsay to the vacancy occasioned by Mr. Parkers election, I desire only to entreat your attention to his compeer Mr. M. Livingston, should it be...
As you will be on the ground or convenient to it for negotiating further engagments on the Mohawk as well as concluding that we have already enter’d into, I commit to you the papers respecting it. You will take such steps as you find necessary in both instances. We hope to see you if convenient on your way to N. York. Let me hear from you in the mean time whilst you remain where you are....
I should not have availed my self of yr. kind Indulgence, called a Stipulation, but sooner acknowledged the rect. of yr. favr. of Feby. 24th., had not the March Winds disorde[re]d my crazy Constitution, & rendered writing rather disagreable. I was made happy in finding that the Main body of the Eastern Insurgents were dispersed, had repented & were restored to the body of Orderly Citizens. I...
I wrote to you by the last post since which nothing material has turned up here. We are debating on amendments without having decided what is to be done with them. There is so great a diversity in the views of our opponents that it is impossible to predict any thing. Upon the whole however our fears diminish. Yrs Affecty I take the liberty for certain reasons to put the inclosed under cover to...
I have been here about a Fortnight during which time we have not made a Congress. So. Carolina, Virga, Pennsa, N. Jersey, & Massachussets are represented. There is one Member from each of the States of Rhode Island, N. Carolina & Georgia, but none from New Hampshire, Connecticut N. York, Delaware or Maryland. I very much wish we may make a house in a week or ten days, as I think the...
I wrote you last on the 12th. of Jan. since which I have received yours of Octob. 17. Dec. 8. and 12. That of Oct. 17. came to hand only Feb. 23. How it happened to be four months on the way, I cannot tell, as I never knew by what hand it came. Looking over my letter of Jan. 12th. I remark an error of the word ‘probable’ instead of ‘improbable,’ which doubtless however you had been able to...
Letter not found. 28 April 1787. Mentioned in JM’s letter of 13 June 1787 to Ambrose Madison (MH). Concerned information regarding the illness of James Madison, Sr., and the results of the spring election.
I have the honor to inclose you a large Bundle of Papers sent to my Care by his Excellency Thoms Jefferson Ambassador of the US at the Court of Versailles to be Forwarded to you. I comply with a very great pleasure with his Excellency’s orders, Since it procures me the opportunity to assure you that I have the honor to be with the highest regard Most Honored Sir Your most obedt Hble Servt I...
I have your favor of the 24. which pursuing me by a circuitous route, did not reach this untill within a few days. I place value on every mark of your friendship & to convince you that public business alone was not what induc’d me to revive impressions which were strongly imprinted on my breast. I now write you from a recess, where news of private happiness can be the only subject of...
Was I to found my Hopes Upon the Letters I have from Congress, I would please my fancy with the Expectation of Wellcoming You to the European Shore—and Yet, when I Remember Your obstinate plans of life, I am affraid least my Warm Wishes Should be disappointed—in the Mean While, I will Continue writing, and By the Way Will advise You to send Your Answers By the packets Rather than By a private...
Your obliging letter of 5t. October reached me before I left Woodville. I was detained some days by an indisposition so that the Resolutions on which the Address to Congress and letter to Clinton were founded, had passed before my arrival, I had however the pleasure of giving my negative to the Address and Letters themselves, and of contributing somewhat towards forming those which were...
My business has yet detained me here. Three days ago I returned from a visit to the great falls where Genl. Washington was to have met me. The rain stopped him & the other directors, which to me was a mortifying disappointment as I entertained hopes with their aid to have concluded amicably & advantageously the dispute with Mr Fairfax. This is in train, tho the prospect is not the most...
At the same time that I acknowledge the receipt of your obliging favor of the 21st. Ult. from New York, I promise to avail myself of your indulgence of writing only when it is convenient to me. If this should not occasion a relaxation on your part, I shall become very much your debtor—and possibly like others in similar circumstances (when the debt is burthensome) may feel a disposition to...
Letter not found. ca. 6 December 1787, Tarborough. Mentioned in Hawkins to JM, 14 Feb. 1788 . Reports the time set for the election and meeting of the North Carolina ratifying convention.
Yr. favor from G Town came to hand, likewise yrs. of the 10th. Instant I receiv’d a few days past. As I do not know of an opportunity of conveying this to you, it is probable you will see in the papers, the result of the proceedings of our Convention, before this reaches you. It is expected this day will close the important business, if it was not determin’d yesterday. Our Convention consists...
I committed some hasty thoughts to paper in an illegible hand, which I sent you by Doctr. Griffin, relative to a clause in the British debt bill that you told me, pass’d the House of delegates by an almost unanimous assent, directing those who had paid British Debts into the public Treasury, to pay them over again. From the little consideration I had given this question myself. & from the...
I have not yet been able to execute your commission to Mr. Beckley; but shall take care to forward the act as soon as it can be obtain’d. The report of a tendency to Insurrection in several quarters of the State is not without some foundation; tho’ the friends of Order have hitherto mantain’d the Superiority, so as to prevent any very outrageous doings. An expectation of a remedy for their...
It is now several months since I was honord with a letter from you. During the recess of Congress, while your attention was not closely confind to public business, and while the situation of the Union must have furnishd you with daily information which woud have been interesting to you, I flatterd myself you woud not have neglected your friend. The approaching elections are the subject of...
The papers necessary to our European project are enclosed herewith—viz my power of attorney, your remarks which are so full that I can add nothing, the old plot of the canal which must be kept by you, and a copy sent, it being not fit—& my letr. to Mr. Jefferson. The last explains fully the manner which appeared to be best for us to embrace, but should any thing be improper, you can pass it...
I have the honor, as well as great Pleasure, of enclosing a diploma from the College of New Jersey, whereby you will find the Trustees of that Institution, have not been unmindful of the Obligations the public owe you for past Services. May you long enjoy the public Favour while they reap the benefit of your valuable Labours. Dr. Witherspoon gave me a Letter directed to you to send with the...
In appealing to your Candor I feel a confidence that no apology will be necessary for the present mode of address. Before I left Virginia I communicated to my good friend Mr: Randolph, the reasons that induced me to become a Candidate for the appointment of Clerk to the House of Representatives of the United States, and for that purpose to relinquish the public situation in which I stood...
Letter not found. ca. 20 November 1786. Mentioned in JM’s letter of 7 December 1786 to his father . Made business inquiries of JM as to who was to receive the tobacco for Anderson’s brother; the discount rate of indents in Richmond; and whether these loan office certificates for his tax payments were obtainable.
This day for the first our President Mr. Hancock took his Seat in convention, and we shall probably terminate our business on Saturday or Tuesday next. I cannot predict the issue, but our Hopes are increasing—if Mr. Hancock does not disappoint our present Expectations our wishes will be gratified. But his character is not entirely free from a portion of caprice—this however is confidential....
I thank you for your letter of the 9h. instant and am glad to learn that you think the chance is in your favour. I hope no disagreeable change may happen. Yet I own I fear something from your indisposition. Our debate here began on the clause respecting the proportion of representation &c. which has taken up two days. Tomorrow I imagine we shall talk about the power over elections. The only...
By some inexplicable mystery, the inclosed letter from Mr. Jones, and my intended answer to your last epistolary favor, have still remained in my possession. Being engaged when the gentleman, who brought your friendly attention to me, I doubt whether I gave him an intelligible reply to his question, if my answer was ready. Our apparent disobedience to the appointment of the assembly must be...
I have not heard from you lately but hope it hath not arisen from ill-health. Two days since we recd. dispatches from Mr. Adams in which he informs us of his demand of the surrender of the posts, & remonstrance agnst the violation of the treaty also in the instance of the negroes, with the answer of the minister to his memorial. In this answer it is stated that the King admits a violation in...
Lafayette arrived in New York on 4 August 1784 for a visit which lasted until 21 December 1784 when he sailed to France aboard the frigate La Nymphe . During his stay, he was greeted by Washington and other Virginians at Richmond on 18 November. After feastings, celebrations, and a visit to the State Assembly, the two Revolutionary heroes spent a few days at Mount Vernon and then went north,...
In my last I think I informed you that the elections had turned out, beyond expectation, favourable to the Antifœderal party. They have a majority of two thirds in the Convention and according to the best estimate I can form of about four sevenths in the community. The views of the leaders in this City are pretty well ascertained to be turned towards a long adjournment say till next spring or...
I have omitted to write to you since my return home, from an inability to obtain so accurate a grasp of the Opinions prevailing here, as to justify me in communicating the politics of our legislature. The first raptures in favor of the constitution were excessive. Every town resounded with applause. The conjectures of my reasons for refusing to sign were extraordinary, and so far malicious, as...
Seven o’clock, and retired to my fireside, I have determined to enter into conversation with you; this is a village of about 5,000 inhabitants when the court is not here and 20,000 when they are, occupying a valley thro’ which runs a brook, and on each side of it a ridge of small mountains most of which are naked rock. The king comes here in the fall always, to hunt. His court attend him, as...