You
have
selected

  • Author

    • Pendleton, Edmund
  • Recipient

    • Madison, James
  • Period

    • Confederation Period
  • Correspondent

    • Madison, James

Dates From

Dates To

Search help
Documents filtered by: Author="Pendleton, Edmund" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="Confederation Period" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
Results 11-22 of 22 sorted by relevance
  • |<
  • <<
  • <
  • Page 1
  • >
  • >>
  • >|
Summary ( LC : Madison Miscellany). Copied from a calendar, probably prepared about 1850 by Peter Force’s clerk. He noted that the manuscript of the letter, addressed “To James Madison,” consisted of “1 page 4°.” Recovery from illness. Sir Guy Carlton. The people Eastward averse to the half-pay, or commutation. The British restrictive proclamation. Pendleton probably referred to his own...
Letter not found. 18 December 1784 . The list probably kept by Peter Force (DLC: Madison Miscellany) indicates Pendleton wrote a letter from Edmundsbury on this day that was an “Appeal for the family of Philip Davis; a forger of tobacco notes.” The punishment for forging tobacco notes was death ( Hening, Statutes William Waller Hening, ed., The Statutes at Large; Being a Collection of All the...
… A Republic was inevitably the American form, and its Natural danger Pop. Tumults & Convulsions. With these in view I read over the Constitution accurately; do not find a Trait of any Violation of the great Principles of the form, all Power being derived mediately or immediately from the People. No Title or Powers that are either hereditary or of long duration so as to become Inveterate; and...
Since my last yr. sevl. favrs. of Augt. 24th. & 30th. & Sepr. 20th. have reached me, the two former filling up the Chasim I supposed in yr. letters. The question touching Garrison’s in time of peace, is in it’s nature delicate as well as difficult, and therefore I don’t Wonder there should be diversity of Opinions about it. They seem useful & indeed necessary, & yet have their certain evils,...
I am unwilling at all times to intermeddle with the business of the legislature, & particularly concerned when under a necessity of making application to a particular friend of that body, but when I am impelled to it by the situation of a distressed Neice, & a family of her small Children, I know your own feelings will suggest my Appology. She is the unfortunate wife of Philip Davis, who is...
I should not have availed my self of yr. kind Indulgence, called a Stipulation, but sooner acknowledged the rect. of yr. favr. of Feby. 24th., had not the March Winds disorde[re]d my crazy Constitution, & rendered writing rather disagreable. I was made happy in finding that the Main body of the Eastern Insurgents were dispersed, had repented & were restored to the body of Orderly Citizens. I...
The Governor in his return drop’d at the Bowling Green, yr. very kind favr. of the 20th. past covering the result of your long labours at Philadelphia, for both of which I thank you. I had heard of and lamented the withholding the Names of the two respectable Gentn. of our delegation, tho’ am yet Ignorant of the ground of their dissention; what ever it was, I cannot approve their Conduct. To...
I have hitherto delayed to pay you my respects, lest I should for a moment withdraw your Attention from the great & important work you was engaged in; but the papers having announced that the Convention had settled the Principles of their System, and appointed a Committee to reduce it to form, I could no longer delay letting you know I am yet in the living Class, I think my health considerably...
Printed excerpt (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 694 [1892], p. 94). About 1850 the present letter was calendared, probably by a clerk of Peter Force, as follows: “Garrisons in time of peace. A standing army the bane of society. Should garrisons be Continental or supported by the States where located. German-Town as a seat for the Government merely another name for Philadelphia. Trade with...
This date makes me blush when I acknowledge to have reced. in due time yr. kind favr. of October 22d., which found me at Richmond, engaged incessantly in the business of the Courts until December. Fond of ease after my return home, and occupied by the conviviality of the late Season, it wholly escaped my recollection until now that I am left alone. You’l have long since been informed that Mr....
I have to thank you for yr. favr. of the 23d. past, which was the more acceptable, as I had heard that your fever had returned on Your Northern journey, & I feared might have continued your too long Companion. The Resolutions respecting the Missippi. Navigation, Are of a Balmy Nature, tending to give Repose to those concerned, and impose silence On such as caring nothing about it, used the...
I thank you For yr. Favr. of the 30th. past and For your kind concern about my health, which has been better than usual For about three Weeks past, but in truth rises and falls like the flame of an expiring Candle in the Socket, & seem[s] to forbid all hopes of so radical a cure, as I am sure yr. Plan For accelerating the Admon of Justice, if carried into effect would prove to the present...