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Documents filtered by: Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron, the Duke de la Rochefaucoult, as well as the “New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one center genuine...
I have recd. your favor of the 22d Ult: with the two vols. bearing the name of Condorcet. If the length of time they remained in your hands, had been in the least inconvenient to me, which was not the case, the debt would have been greatly overpaid, by the interesting observations into which you were led by the return of them. The idea of a Government “in one center” as explained and espoused...
Accept my thanks for your favour of last month. The safe Arrival of your books has quieted my conscience. There is nothing within the narrow Compass of human knowledge more interesting, than the Subject of your Letter. If “the Idea of a Government in one Center Seems to be every where exploded” perhaps Something remains undefined, as dangerous, as plausible and pernicious as that Idea. Half a...
Permit me to present you, what I think a Curiosity. Dr Mayhews Thirtieth of January Sermon, preached and printed almost Seventy Years ago. It made a great Sensation in New England: and not a little Noise in old England where Several Editions of it were reprinted and one especially which was inserted in a Collection of Tracts in four Volumes under the Title of “The Pillars of Priestcraft and...
On my return two days ago from a Meeting appointed to report to the Legislature of the State a proper Scite for a University, I found your obliging favor of July 22. with its inclosed copies of Docr. Mayhews Sermon. I have read with pleasure this symbol of the political tone of thinking at the period of its original publication. The author felt the strength of his argument, and has given a...
I pay with much pleasure the debt of thanks for the copy of Mr. Wells’s Oration so kindly forwarded by you. It is a concise and well presented view of the great event celebrated, with a judicious selection of circumstances proper to be combined with it. I avail myself of this as of every occasion of renewing to you assurances of my high esteem and best wishes. MHi : Adams-Hull Collection.
[1827?] Although the date when JM prepared this manuscript must remain uncertain, it could well have been written in the autumn of 1827, during his exchange of letters with George Mason’s grandson about the Virginia Declaration of Rights and first Form of Government, and at a time when a revision of the state constitution was much in the public mind. The manuscript has considerable unity of...
8The Madison Family Tree (Madison Papers)
This family tree, framed under glass, is in LC: Madison Miscellany. For reasons given below, JM could hardly have prepared the chart earlier than the close of 1813 or later than September 1819. He apparently left among his papers at the time of his death a brief statement about his forebears. This document, now lost, came into the possession of his niece, Mrs. Lucie Hartwell Conway. She...
We come, Sir, on behalf of the Citizens of Washington, to mingle our congratulations with our regrets at your political retirement; congratulations that spring from our participation as Americans in the untarnished glory that accompanies you—regrets that flow from feelings alive to the loss we are so soon to experience. At this event, as Citizens of a great community, we feel a pride only...
I am much indebted to the Citizens of Washington, in whose behalf you speak, for the expressions of regard and respect addressed to me. These sentiments are the more valuable to me, as my long residence among them has made me well acquainted with their many titles to my esteem, at the same time that it has enabled them to mark more particularly the course of my public and personal conduct....
The magnificent spectacle which a voluntary retirement from the most exalted station, furnishes, is this day exemplified in you. Elevated by the suffrages of a free people to the highest office in their gift, the termination of the constitutional term found you in possession of their unabated confidence, which they expressed by a repetition of their will that you should continue to preside...
Give me leave to Congratulate you on the success of your Administration, and to accept of my best wishes for your present & futer Happiness, being well persuaded you retire from the cares of State with the full approbation of your own consience. Presumeing you may have some moments of lieusure, let me draw your attention to a class of men who have supported the measures of Goverment dureing 10...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Colman with his thanks for the “Century Sermon,[”] he has been so good as to inclose with his letter of the 21st. Ult. Mrs. Madison is equally thankful for the Copy of Mr. Buckminster’s Sermons presented to her. Neither of us can at present avail ourselves of the pleasure of perusing the publications: but a very short time will relieve us both from the...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
I recd. some days ago your favor of the 26 ult: but this is the first moment I have found to acknowlege it. I learn with great pleasure your intention to publish the life and writings of your father. The latter will be a rich addition to our political and literary treasures: and the former a portrait worthy of a conspicuous place in the biographical Gallery. I think too favorably of the public...
I take the Liberty of enclosing you a prospectus of a Reading Room for the Metropolis of the Union upon an improved plan, and respectfully to solicit your patronage for the Institution. From the countenace at present shewn to the undertaking, the establishment promises soon to be in a prosperous condition. In retirement from public life—I pray you may enjoy health, with the pleasing...
Besey calling on me for some seed allows me just time to write a line, to await your arrival at home, requesting your attendance as a visitor of our proposed college on Tuesday the 8th. of April, being the day after our election. You will of course, I am in hopes come here the day or evening before, that we may have some previous consultation on the subject. I shall also request Genl. Cocke &...
Your two favors of the 8 & 25 ult: were duly recd. The memoir in the former was put into the hands of Mr. Sampson who I found had both a personal & patriotic acquaintance with you, and who employed all his strength in pulling down the errors opposed to our Cotton Manufacturies. The paper in the other letter, was also communicated to him. The last under a blank cover was recd. too late to be...
It is with the hope, that I may be permitted without the imputation of vanity, to convey in this manner to Mr. & Mrs. Madison, upon their retireing to the pleasing scenes of private life, my most sincere wishes, that they may both long enjoy every felicity, which this world can possibly afford; and to beg they will have the goodness to be assured, that although, I have not on particular...
On a long list of epistolary debts which I could not attend to, during the period of my public duties, is your favor containing explanations relating to “A Journal of a young man &c.” I beg leave now to thank you for that mark of your attention. The reception given by the public to the work is the best evidence of its interesting character; and a perusal of a part of it only, a sufficient one...
Letter not found. Ca. 16 March 1817. Offered for sale in Anderson Catalogue No. 958 (9–10 May 1912), item 161, where it is described as being an extract of a letter “to the author of ‘Historical Sketches of the Late War’ thanking him for the book, and praising the work.” Also offered for sale in Harmers of New York, Sale 2858 (12 June 1990), item 20, where it is noted the envelope was...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favour with its inclosure and shall attend to your commands as soon as the work is published. The deviation from the rule you have adopted in regard to publications as you explained to me in your letter impresses me with a high sense of the honor conferred on my work. I entertain well grounded hopes that the American discovery of a new principle of...
I have recd. yours of with the preceding one on the same subject. I sincerely wish the success to your Biographical Undertaking which your exertions merit; both for your own sake, and for the gratification it is capable of affording to the Public. But having not yet perused the half volume I possess, I can not say more than was said in the few lines heretofore dropt you. In truth, considering...
Your letter of Feby 6th Covering the Resolution & address of the General Assembly did not reach me till the 18th instant. I request the favor of you to communicate the enclosed answer, and accept assurances of my high respect. I have receivd from his Excellency the Lieutenant Governor your address of Feby. 4. with the sensibility due to the kind expressions which distinguish it. Although I...
Mr. Birkbeck, a very extensive, and one of the most scientific and best practical agriculturalists of England, not liking the present state of things here, and having a very exalted opinion of our Country, and being also a great admirer of its political institutions, has determined to remove to and settle in it with his Family. Knowing your partiality for agriculture, I take the liberty of...
Actuated by the influence of respect for your private Character as a Citizen retiring from public duty to enjoy the Sweet reflection of a life spent in the Service of Your Country; though a Stranger I hope you will pardon my presumption in thus intruding this Epistle on Your attention— Have you a Son !! the prop of your declining years! the hope of your illustrious house!! Such a one once was...
Permit me to trouble you with the perusal of the enclos’d copy of a letter, I have this day written to the Secretary of the Navy to remove, in case you have decided on my Claim, any unfavorable impressions on your mind, which a knowledge of the circumstances alluded to, in the enclos’d communication may have made. As an Officer of the American Navy I most assuredly have felt the highest...
I cannot take my final leave of Washington, without calling to mind the epistolary debt remaining due to you. On consulting with Mr. Monroe some time ago, it was understood that your stay in Holland would be prolonged untill next fall, if not next Spring, by a joint negociation with the Govt. of the Netherlands, on the subject of a commercial Treaty. You will have received the communications...
Notwithstanding the lapse of time, nothing definitive has taken place, in concert with Mr. Hassler, in relation to Mr. Le Sueur. Mr. Crawford has the subject in hand, and will communicate the result. I can add but little to the public information which goes to you from the official source, and thro’ the press. You will find that specie is at length re-instated in its legitimate functions; at...
Yours on the subject of Mr. Brewer was duly received, and would alone have been a sufficient evidence of his worth. It would have been very agreeable, if it could have been rewarded by such an appointment as he wished, consistently with the pretensions of others, & with the collateral considerations which necessarily turn the scale, where there may be an equilibrium of qualifications. Had the...