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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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It is highly probable that my humble name has never reached your ears, unless through the medium of occasional newspaper paragraphs, in which, owing to the nature of my profession, it has but too often appeared for twenty years past. Still, as one who is not ignorant of the extent or value of your public services; who admires your exalted talents, and appreciates, he hopes duly, the purity of...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Hoffman thanks him for the copy of his lecture lately delivered in the University of Maryland. In the decrepit & feeble state of the health of J. M. he has not been able to bestow on some parts of the lecture the degree of attention which they merit. He can safely pronounce it to be a happy example in which erudite disquisition is presented in language not...
I have received and thank you for your favor of the 2d. instant, with the edifying pamphlet proceeding from the Agricultural Convention lately held at Albany; and the paper describing the festive welcome given to the return of Mr. Irving. The distinguished honour done him was due to his genius, and the literary fruits of it, which his Country may well be proud of. I thank you also for your...
J. M. has received the copy of the "Historical Discourse" for which he is indebted to the politeness of Mr. Lawrence. The subject of it was well chosen and has been well handled. Mr. L. will please to accept the thanks due for the pleasure afforded by its perusal. FC (DLC) .
Your letter of the 1st. instant followed by a copy of your speech on Congressional priviledges, found me in my bed; to which I have been confined for several weeks by a billious fever uniting itself with a severe Rheumatism, which had kept me a cripple, particularly my hands & fingers, & a prisoner in my house for many months. The fever, has I hope ceased but leaves me in much debility. In...
This Indenture made the fifth day of June one thousand eight hundred and thirty two between James Madison of the County of Orange and Dolly P. Madison, his wife of the one part, and John H. Lee and John Willis of the said County of the other part; Witnesseth, that the said James Madison, and Dolly P., his wife in consideration of three thousand seven hundred and twenty two Dollars and fifty...
We send off to day a wagon with two hogsheads of tobacco. The tobacco is not large but grown in fresh mountain soil. It seems to have a fine odour, has been neatly handled, and put up in good order by my new overseer, who has the reputation of skill and experience. I hope it will suit the taste of the Manufacturers, and find a good market. Our crop was small not exceeding 8 Hhds. The two sent...
I am about sailing from France where it is necessary I should spend a few months to attend to the claims I have on the French & American Governments. I must begin by the former before addressing myself to Congress. The goodness with which you have heretfore testyfyed your interest in the efforts of my father & of my own for the Independence & wellfare of this Country, has made it a duty for me...
By tomorrows mail I will forward you a copy of my Speech in the Case of Houston <B>ayard with a breach of the privileges of the house of Representatives—I will thank you to prepare it, if not too troublesome, & would feel gratified with your opinion— You will perceive in what manner I have attributed to you, the authorship of the Judiciary act of 1789—A letter from the Hon. David < >ggett of...
I have recd. your letter of May 22d. & thank you for the interest you kindly take in my health. For several years it has not been good; During the present, I have been suffering from a severe Rheumatism which has confined me to the house, & the addition of bilious fever has for many days, confined me to my bed The fever is leaving me but with less of strength to struggle agt. the Rheumatism. I...
I am indebted to you I observe for a copy of Mr. Doddridge’s speech on the subject of Congressional privelege. A part of it has been read to me and judging from that of what remains, I need not hesitate to pronounce it an able one as was to be expected from its able author. As he is under a mistake in supposing me to have drawn the judicial act of 1789 and wishes for information, it may be...
Whilst reflecting in my sick bed a few mornings ago, on the dangers hovering over our Constitution and even the Union itself, a few ideas which, tho’ not occurring for the first time, had become particularly impressive at the present. I have noted them by the pen of a friend, on the inclosed paper, and you will take them for what they are worth. If that be anything, and they happen to accord...
I in common with many of my fellow Citizens of this place feeling a deep interest in evry thing relating to you beg leave respectfully to enquire after your health—I have learnd with much regret that you have been dangerously ill &c to ascertain Whether the report be true or not is the purpos of this Communication. Permit me Sir to enclose you a Communication I received a few days since from...
I am emboldened again to trouble you, in consequence of having met with so kind and flattering a reception on a recent occasion; The law relative to non imprisonment for debt—I am pleased and proud to say, has taken effect, and is accompanied with the most cheering consequences—Altho’ opposed with great vigour by the members of the bar and others—immediately interested—it was successfully and...
I have received your letter with the book referred to, and dictate the acknowledgement of it to a pen that is near me. I will read the work, as soon as I may be able; When that will be, I cannot say. I have been confined to my bed many days by a bilious attack. The fever is now leaving me, but in a very enfeebled state, and without any abatement of my Rheumatism; which besides its general...
When I shall have enumerated the many, and concurring motives, which have induced me to obtrude myself, thus uncerimoniously on your notice, I hope I shall escape the censure of presumption, and be pardoned the act. I will give you my history, as laconically, as possible; I am the son of an old Revolutionary Soldier, who expended almost the whole of his slender fortune in the education of his...
I have been intending to write ever since we had the pleasure—a most heartfelt one—of hearing of the favorable turn in your health; but things have crowded upon me in such a way as to make me procrastinate. H. L.’s book reached here yesterday. It is a realization of your apprehensions concerning the consequences that might result from the Charlottesville publication, if proper care were not...
I received your letter of the 29. ultimo with every wish to attempt a compliance with its request; but for some days past I have been suffering under a bilious attack now confining me to my bed which disqualifies me from mental exertion, as my rheumatism does my hands and fingers from the search into papers which are voluminous and without an index; whilst My recollection affords me no...
Having been employd by Mr French to prosecute his claims for land bounty granted to the officers and soldiers of the Revolution by a recent act of Congress, The within order is enclosed to you at his request. Should there be any papers or vouchers in your possession that would be usefull in authenticating the claims of Mr French, and you can with propriety part with them, you would confer a...
You have my grateful acknowlledgements for your Answers (recd. last fall) to my enquiries upon the U. S. Bank. It was not, nor, will not be made Public. Permit me again to ask your opinion, upon an other subject, of more importance to the People of these States, then the Bank question. I mean the Georgia and Cherik< e> question. Is the decission of the Supreme Court of the U. S. Correct. I...
I beg leave to send You a copy of a Report of a select Committee of the Senate on the subject of the New Apportionment. The amendment recommended in that report has prevailed in the Senate by the casting vote of the Vice-President. The bill as amended has been referred in the H. R to a Committee of which I am a Member. I am greatly desirous of knowing your Opinion of the principle of this...
It is my painful duty to inform you, that Mr Arthur S. Brockenbrough departed this life, at 1 o’c., today. By this event, the office of Patron of the Students of the University is rendered vacant; and it is provided, by the Enactments, that a vacancy, in this office, "occurring during the recess of the Board, may be filled by appointment under the hands and seals of the Executive Committee,...
Do me the favor to forward the inclosed letter to your brother, left open for your perusal & to accept my friendly salutations. FC (DLC) .
Your letter of Feby. 17—was duly recd. under a cover from your brother in the Senate of the U.S. An examination of the papers of my Father, having furnished no light on the assigt. to him by your Grandfather Saml. Dalton of a share in the Loyal Company, the present agent of the company was written to by my brother Wm. the only acting Exr. of my Father, requesting such information as might be...
Annexed I send for your approval, my check on the President & Directors of the Literary Fund, for Five thousand dollars, part of the annuity to the University of the current year. With my best wishes for your good health, I Remain Dr. Sir most Respectfully Your most Obt. St. RC (DLC) .
I beg leave to introduce to your acquaintance, Mr Fournier, an Advocate of the Paris Bar, and his friend Mr D’Orsay, a Gentleman of a respectable family in France, both men of information & such as we like to see—travelling thro’ our Country, whither they have come partly on business, & partly for the acquisition of Knowledge. They are desirous of seeing in you one of those Fathers of our...
Please to give to John M Walker or John H Price the certifycat which was given to mee for Thirty Six pounds for my pay as a regular Soldier in the Army of the revolution which certifycat was placed in your hands by Saml French a number of years ago and also any papers which you may have of Samuel French that may in any way assist to establish his claim to land bounty, I being the Surviveing...
I have just recd from Professor Patterson a copy of his Circular to the Ex. Commee. notifying the death of Mr Brockenbrough, and recomending an arrangt. for filling the vacancy till the meeting of the Visitors. The expediency of the course proposed, seems well supported by his reasons for it, but Genl. Cocke & yourself will be decide on the case much better yn. I could. My Rheumatism still...
I have recd your letter of the 22d. It was a little delayed by being addressed to Charlottesvill instead of the P. Office near me. There must be some mistake in the circumstances refering to a conversation with Mr Colton. I have no recollections that coincide with them. Notwithstanding the qualifications and accomplishments of Mr. Cardella I can authorize no expectation that he would find an...
I recd. in due time your letter inclosing one from your brother on the subject of the "Loyal Company" & wd have given an early answer had I possessed the information asked for. During the life of my Father his connection with that company was never an object of my attention & since his death his interest in it has been entirely left to my brother Wm. Madison, the only acting Executor who has...
My friend Mr Robert C. Winthrop, a son of the Lieut: Governor of Massachusetts, being desirous of seeing Virginia, and particularly anxious to become personally acquainted with you, I take the liberty of introducing him, and his Lady, and Miss Gardner, by whom he is accompanyed, to you and Mrs. Madison I avail myself of this occasion to send you and Mrs Madison a lithographic likeness recently...
J. Madison with his respects to Mr. Gray returns his thanks for the copy of his oration "On the hundredth anniversary of the Birthday of Washington." He has read it with the pleasure which could not fail to be afforded by a performance in which so much well chosen matter is so eloquently adapted to so interesting an occasion. RC (MB) ; draft (DLC) .
Your favor of the 24th. Ult. was duly recd. a few days ago; and I have since recd. a letter from Docr. Hawes informing me that he had deposited the remittance of $1650. with wch. he was so good as to take charge in the Farmers B. Bank at Fredbg. I need not say how thankful Mrs. W. & myself are for this addition proof of your obliging attention, and intentions. I beg you to be assured Sir, of...
I have recd. your favor of the 19th. & am much indebted for the trouble you have taken in determining the Lat: & Long of Montpellier, a scientific distinction not before conferred on it. I have recd. also the 2. pamphlets by Mr Gray, for which I owe you my thanks. "The Oration" proves that his talents were not unequal subject & the occasion, signal as these were. The "letter to Govr. Lincoln",...
I have duly recd. yours of the 17th. Altho you kindly release me from a reply, it may be proper to say that some of the circumstances to which you refer were not before known to me. On the great question before Congress, on which so much depends out of Congress, I ought the less to obtrude an opinion, as its merits essentially depend on details which I never investigated, and of which I am an...
My apology for troubling you with this letter is the desire I feel to serve a friend whom I honor and admire for his distinguished genius in the Fine Arts. I have reference to Mr. Cardella, a native of Italy, and the late successful instructer in drawing, music and italian, at the Mt. Pt. Class. Institution, Amherst, Mass. I have recently learnt, on the authority of one of the Principals of...
J. M has duly recd. the Speech of Mr. R on the "protection of American industry. J. M. has read it, as he has others taking opposite views of the subject, with a just sense of the eloquence & ability, brought forth by the discussion. He cannot but hope, notwithstanding the antipode opinions wch. have appeared, that some intermediate ground will be traced, for an accommodation, so impressively...
I recd the within letter from Mr Lee yesterday & that from Dr Hawes this afternoon. I enclose a check in your favour for $725 retaining from your moity $100 to replace the advance a few years ago for your share of the remittance to Kenty. for taxes, called for by a friend when you were not at home. I was obliged to borrow the money & have been paying the interest since, & still am. The Acct of...
J Madison has duly recd. the copy of Mr Tyler’s speech on the reduction of the duties on Imports, politely forwarded. It presents very ably & impressively the views it takes of the subject; & has the merit of a conciliatory advance towards an adjustment on liberal terms, so much recommended by patriotic considerations. With his thanks to Mr Tyler, J. M. tenders assurances of his cordial esteem...
I have the pleasure of transmitting herewith a copy of the oration delivered in this City on the 22d. of February by Hon. Francis C. Gray and also of the third edition of his letter to Governor Lincoln on Harvard University, which it is hoped will be acceptable It was with great regret, that I, a few days ago, learned of your continued suffering from rheumatism, but all here, hope, you have...
I recd. with much pleasure your obliging note of the 13t. inst. Anxious to deserve your good opinion, allow me to say, in defence or mitigation of the "effusion of personal feeling," that the name of Mr Gallatin had, prior to the meeting of Congress, been put forth by a late Governor of So. Carolina, with much parade, as opposed to all American systems ; that he had accepted the appointment of...
By request of Jared Sparks, Esq. we have this day placed in the mail a parcel directed to you. It contains a set of the "Life of Gouverneur Morris" just published. Yours Truly & Resp’y RC (DLC) .
We are likely to fail in getting our Clover seed from the usual source; and will thank you for procuring, it to the amount of six bushels if to be had in Fredg. We expect to send a Waggon down very shortly, which will be a conveyance Retaining my full confidence in your better judgt. of the Market, I do not venture advice on the subject. I hope you will be able to catch any transitory rise, or...
J. Madison has duly recd. the Copy of the "National Calendar" for which he is indebted to Messrs. Thompson & Homans. And he cannot make his acknowledgments for it, without joining in the Commendations of a work which the Author has made so rich in acceptable information RC (DLC : Dolley P. Madison Papers); FC (DLC) .
Mr. Robbins sends the copy, inclosed herewith, of his Speech, in token of his high respects, & grateful regards for Mr. Madison. RC (DLC) .
J. Madison has duly recd. the pamphlet copy of Mr. Marshalls speech "on the abolition of Slavery," with wch. he has been favored. It very ably discusses the important subject, and very advantageously presents the particular views espoused by the Author. J. M. begs Mr. Marshall, to accept with his acknowledgments for the polite attention, assurances of his cordial esteem & respect RC (ViW) ; FC...
I have recd. your letter of the 7th. & hope my Colleagues will have decided the question it proposes. If it turns on a dispensing power, I do not know that any such belongs to the Ex Committee. But if it be thought that the security agst. a misuse of the indulgence requested by the Students named, be substantially equivalent to the conditions annexed by the law, it is not probable that the...
J. Madison with his best respects to Mr Clay thanks him for the Copy of his speech "In Defence of the American System &c" It is a very able, a very eloquent, and a very interesting one. If it does not establish all its positions, in all their extent, it demolishes not a few of those relied on by the opponents. J. M. feels a pleasure in offering this tribute to its merits. But he must be...
Under the law which allows students, above 20 years of age, to "reside out of the precincts, in such private boardinghouses as the Faculty may approve," permission was granted to Mess. Fairfax Catlett, Alex. G. Taliaferro, and Wm. P. Clark to live with Mr. Meredith Jones, on the Charlottesville road. Mr. Jones has recently removed, from his former residence, to Gen. Cocke’s House, on the same...
I can find no paper relating to the Shares in Loyal Company. No paper was transmitted by me to Richmond. The Books of the Company contain the evidence of our Fathers interest in the Shares. I have for a long time wished to visit you but the very low state of my wife’s health has prevented me. If I can leave her at night I will come up in a day or two and examine the Ledgers & papers in your...