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Documents filtered by: Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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I take the liberty of directing this to you, to ask your encouragement of an establishment designed to promote medical science, by the means of relieving the diseased poor around us. There is not in our country a population equal to that of this city and Georgetown, (exceeding twenty thousand,) which has not some medical institution for the relief of the sick. In addition to the number of poor...
Having voted against the proposed restriction on Missouri, attempts are making to prevent my re-election to a seat in Congress. This question is not generally understood and the restrictionists are actively employed in endeavoring to destroy the popularity of those who opposed the measure. In 1804, you appointed me to a situation in the Dept. of State, which I held for Six years. Soon after my...
I have just recd. yours of the 6th. inst. Knowing nothing that could in the least detract from the respect & confidence of which you have had successive marks from me, I should always be ready to bear the testimony, requested under circumstances not liable to be misconstrued or misrepresented. How far those under wch. it would not be given are of that character I can not but think may deserve...
We beg leave to inform you that by the Scipio, Capt Drummond, for Norfolk, we shipped the goods you directed should be purchased, and consigned them to Mess Moses Myers & Son, requesting them to receive Mess Mackay & Campbells instructions respecting them. We judged it best to send them to Norfolk as there may be no vessel from hence to the Rappahannoc this twelvemonth. We must apprize you...
When I left Montpelier, I did not imagine that we should bring away more than we had carried. I find however, that three books belonging to the library, and a fourth belonging to Mr. T’s room, were transferred from the apartment to which Mrs. Scott was conducted, to Mrs. Hay’s chamber, and stowed away by her maid among her baggage. This petty larceny was not discovered until several days after...
I have recd. the letter which you did me the honor to write to me on the 13th. inst. The reasons which you give, for not wishing publicity to be given to your opinion as to the manner in which I discharged my official duties, while you were at the head of the Govt., are satisfactory. It is gratifying to me to learn, that you “should always be ready to bear the testimony requested, under...
¶From James Monroe. Letter not found. 22 September 1820 . Offered for sale in The Collection of Autographs of Hon. James T. Mitchell (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 731 [1894], 77).
[ … ] I am greatly encouraged to find that what I have been zealously contending for has recently been maintained by the Revd. Holland Weeks of Abingdon Massachusetts. A council of Presbyterian ministers have excommunicated him for entertaining similar dangerous heretical opinions to mine. Glory to God Babylon is on fire he declared before his judges “there is not a single truth remaining in...
I hope you are perswaded that no wish to catch at popularity Induced me to write my former letters—that is the road usually traveled by obscure demagogues whose object it is to exalt themselves, and I wd. deserve contempt had I been actuated by any such motive—every days experience verifies the truth of Lord Mansfields observation that the applause of the mob is not always the meed of merit,...
The conclusion of my last letter was an opinion that if America should manufacture for herself & if Spain should manufacture her own Merino wool & her Iron (& both are unequaled in any other part of the world) that the ship of british Monopoly will loose her Main Anchor—will drift down the current of Adversity & become a wreck on the shore of Mediocrity. This I believe probable but it is so...
At the request of the author, I have the honour of transmitting to you, for your kind acceptance, a volume of poetry, for your good opinion of which, I know he would feel much gratified. An elementary book for the use of schools, new in its design & arrangement, will be issued from the press by the same author, in a fee [ sic ] months; at which time I shall have the pleasure of sending to you...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Thomas, with his acknowledgments for the copy of the Transactions of the American Antiquarian Society, and his best wishes for the success of an Institution, the valuable objects of which are so well explained and recommended in the early pages of the Volume. RC ( MWA : Isaiah Thomas Papers). Isaiah Thomas (1749–1831) was a printer, and publisher of the...
I must rely upon the object I have in view to plead my apology for the freedom I take in obtruding upon your leisure this note. I have for some years viewed with some solicitude the want of an institution for the instruction of indigent youth of native genius and talents in the higher branches of literature, the sciences and the liberal arts. I mean more particularly those, who, having...
In fulfilment of my promise I return the letters to General Washington which you were so obliging as to forward to me. I should have done it sooner but that I had hoped to return at the same time the letters expected from Richmond. Will you permit me to recall your attention to the latter portion (which I believe will comprize the letters I could most wish to obtain) that the Chief Justice may...
I have recd. your letter of the 12th. inst: & I can not speak too favorably of the object which employs your thoughts or of the disinterested zeal with which you devise means for accomplishing it. Of those which have occurred you ask my opinion. I wish it were better entitled to the confidence, you seem to attach to it. Such as it is I give it with the candor, which I can not doubt you will...
On the dismissal of Lieut Col. Gale from the Marine Corps, The officers have alledged to me, through my friend Mr. Pleasonton of the Treasury Department, that, as they do not conceive I have resigned my commission in that Corps, they would be very glad of my being placed at the head of it; to which the date of my Commission would entitle me. I conceive it now to be in your power to do me a...
My relation Mr. Wm. Maury of Liverpool will in a short time commence a long tour thro Kentucky, Tennessee & Mississippi, and from thence to New-Orleans. Being now absent on a tour to the eastward, and expecting to have no leisure on his way thro Virginia, he has requested me by letter, to ask the favor of you to give him letters to a few of the distinguished gentlemen in those states. If you...
We beg to hand Accot sales of your Tobacco pr. scipio, with your Accot Currt. balance £35..12..5. due to you. By the next vessel for Virginia we shall ship the 10 sacks of Salt which you wish for. Mess MacKay & Campbell handed us your dft for £100. on us, & which we shall accordingly appropriate to them if such is your wish—it will in that case leave a balance of £64.7.7. against you,...
I have recd. your note of the 11th. with the little poetical volume of Mr. Mead; for which I desire that my thanks may be accepted. It is so long since I indulged myself in this species of reading, that I can the less venture to pronounce on the merit of the performance. From a hasty glance over it, my attention was caught by passages, which appeared well to accord with the inspiration of the...
This will be handed by Mr. Helme a late Graduate of Brown University in the state of Rhode Island, who at this time lives with me in the Character of a family teacher of the languages &c. Mr. Helme, has at this time a small Vacation & he & my young son Landon C. Read are visiting the upper country for amusement and instruction. Any civilities which you may please to shew them sir, will be...
I recd. yesterday only your letter of Ocr. 20. postmarked Philada. Nov. 4. It would give me pleasure to render you any service in which I might be justified by my recollections. But the attention required by other objects during my official period, with the subsequent lapse of time, will well account for my not being now able to throw any light on the circumstances to which you refer. Nor with...
I have just recd. a letter from Chs. D. Coxe, appealing to my recollection on certain points, and requesting a line from me to yourself. To let you see what has passed, I inclose his letter to me, and a copy of my answer. The former you will be so good as to return. I presume the views of the case to be gathered from authentic sources will readily decide the question of his actual official...
In consequence of a very kind letter of the 13th Ulto. from Mr. Jefferson, in which he recognizes me as one he is pleased to stile “ a fellow laborer indeed, in times never to be forgotten ,” & to treat me as a long tried public and personal friend, I have been led to reply to him, in considerable latitude. I was, at the moment of the receipt of his letter, meditating an application to Mr....
In the early part of September I intended to have done myself the Honor and pleasure of paying my respects to you and to Mrs: Madison. But, just about that time, I heard that you had a great deal of company—Mrs. Mayo —Mrs. Scott & c.—and, therefore, fearing that my visit might be inconvenient, at that juncture, I postponed it. Since then Mrs. Corbin has added a 7th Son to my before numerous...
Your acceptable favor of the 12th of August, reached me about a month ago. I fear that this government will continue deaf to every expostulation that can be addressed to it on the subject of the West India trade. In the negociation of 1818, when Mr Gallatin was here, we made the attempt with all earnestness to prevail upon them to give up their narrow doctrines, but to no effect; whilst...
You will receive by this mail a copy of the message in which I have endeavourd, to place our institutions in a just light, comparatively with those of Europe, without looking at the latter, or even glancing at them by any remark. The state of our finances is I presume more favorable, than was generally supposd. It seems probable that it will improve in future, the quantity of goods which...
Yesterday’s mail brought me your favor of the 16th. with a Copy of your message: the only one reaching me; no newspaper containing it having come to hand. The view you have taken of our affairs can not but be well received at home, and increase our importance abroad. The State of our finances is the more gratifying as it so far exceeds the public hopes. I infer from the language of your letter...
I received very lately your letter of June 28th. with a Copy of the Tragedy of Altorf. I had not before seen it, although its favorable reception on American Theatres had made it Known to me. This reception is the best species of proof that its dramatic structure is well calculated to give force to the just & lofty sentiments of patriotism by which the performance is distinguished. No better...
I have recd. your letter of the 12th. and written one to the President, which will remind him of your successive services to your Country, and convey my sense of their merit and value. Being in no correspondence with any of the present members of the Senate, I feel myself less at liberty to do the same with them; especially as there may be some delicacy in anticipating a nomination from the...
Altho’ I know not that any occasion will arise making it pertinent to bring the political career of Mr. T. Coxe to your attention, I can not in justice to my recollections of it refuse my testimony as to the credit to which he is entitled. I am not unaware that he may have political & perhaps personal enemies who do not speak, as I think, of him. But facts cannot be impaired by opinions. Mr....
I hope you will not infer from the date of this that I am retaliating on the lapse of time between my last, & yours of Mar. 1. which with its inclosures & the Memoirs of Mrs. Huchinson came to hand safely; the former how ever not expeditiously & the latter very tardily. This delay was occasioned chiefly by a misconception between me & the Collector at Norfolk where the 2 vols. were landed and...
I have received, my dear friend, your kind letter of July 22 inclosing your printed opinion on the election project. It was very slow in reaching me. I am very glad to find, by your letter, that you retain, undiminished, the warm feelings of friendship so long reciprocal between us; and, by your “Opinion,” that you are equally constant to the cause of liberty so dear to us both. I hope your...
I had the pleasure of receiving, a few days ago, your favor post-marked the 18th, in lieu of the greater pleasure with which I should have received you in propria persona . I am sorry you so readily yielded to the consideration which deprived us of it in September. The addition of your company would have been felt no otherwise than as an ingredient highly acceptable to that you would have met...
I have taken the liberty to enclose a letter for Mrs Madison also to send through the post office a small book for her subscription it is addressed to you when it comes to hand please be so good as to hand it to her. I have had the misfortune to be under the Necessity of selling of[f] my stock for the benefit of my creditors so that my business has been suspended for 18 months past I am now...
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. We should have recognised the stile even without a signature, and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. This is a sample of the effects we...
The inclosed letter from our antient friend Tenche Coxe came unfortunately to Monticello after I had left it and has had a dilatory passage to this place where I recieved it yesterday and obey it’s injunction of immediate transmission to you. we should have recognised the stile even without a signature and altho so written as to be much of it indecypherable. this is a sample of the effects we...
In answer to your favor dated Novr: 1st: 1817 I had the honor to present my respects in June 1818; confirming by duplicate last Year the same, & not finding myself honor’d with an answer, I suppose they must have been lost. I hope You will excuse me if I intrude for a third time to express my sentiments, that it never was my intention to offend You Sir, in forwarding the Statue of Napoleon,...
The concerns of the Steam Boat Washington have been hitherto so injudiciously conducted, that the Stock has, so far from being valuable as we were authorised to expect, been until now so unproductive, that I flatter myself you will concur with me, that an additional effort should be made to promote its interest. Should I have the honor to possess your good opinion of my zeal and discretion in...
Immediately on my return from the mountains this fall, I seized the first opportunity to fulfill the promise I gave you, in endeavoring to obtain the documents desired & am sorry to say that owing to causes not within my controul, I have as yet been unsuccessful. Mr. Randolph is not only willing, that you should have any letters which you may wish in his possession, but expresses much...
Since my last which was of Aug: 12. I have been favoured with yours of Aug: 30. with which was returned my letter to Mr Keilsall; whose evanishment is not a little remarkable. Notwithstanding the trouble given you by that letter, I am not deterred from relying on your goodness to have the two now inclosed forwarded to the parties. To one of them the direction is so precise that it will readily...
I have just rec’d yours of Decr 1. & inclose the proxy paper signed. I have hitherto been content to let my little interest in the Steam boat be decided without my participation, & shd. have been so on this occasion. Draft ( DLC ). Written below postscript of Tayloe to JM, 1 Dec. 1820 , where it is marked “Decr. 4. Answer.”
I beg your acceptance of my warmest acknowledgements for the kind interest which you were pleased to express for the success of my enterprise on receipt of my first Volume. The second, which I have now the honour to address to you, I have laboured with all the care of which I am capable. And shall feel still dubious whether with Success until I have the opinion of the highest authority in my...
Persons influenced by the british Govt have made such efforts to misrepresent me that I deemed it necessary to explain my motives for these Coms. & thereby to shew their necessity—& as it is now evident that I am opposed to all demagocical pursuits, that my object is to preserve a proper subordination to the laws & to expose & defeat british Incendiary Emissaries engaged in factious...
I had the honour of recg. at its time the Pamphlet You kindly took the trouble to Send me. The Board of Agriculture is about publishing a volume of Memoirs, and I have charged myself with the Superintendance of the Work. Being desirous of making it acceptable to the Publick, and as useful as general Circumstances admit of, I would to that end insert Your Address to the Albermarle Society, if...
I have taken the liberty of sending to your address the first volume of the Biography of the Signers to the Declaration of Independence. Should you find any thing in it worth the perusal, I will thank you for your recommendation, & as the succeeding volumes are published, I shall, with your permission, forward them to you. As the work is intended to perpetuate the lives of men distinguished...
Yours of Novr. 29. came to hand a few days ago. The letter from T. C. is returned. I had one from him lately on the same subject, and in consequence reminded the President of his political career; dropping at the same time a few lines in his favor to our Senator Mr. Barbour. I sincerely wish something proper in itself could be done for him. He needs it and deserves it. The law terminating...
I received some weeks ago from our excellent friend Mr. Corrêa, his farewell to Virginia, and to all whose kindness has made it dear to him. It was natural that the friendship with which you had honored him, and the repeated civilities he had received from you, should be remembered when he was about to leave our country. He especially charges me, to preserve in your memory, the sentiments of...
yours of Nov r 29. came to hand a few days ago. The letter from T.C. is returned. I had one from him lately on the same subject; and in consequence reminded the President of his political career; dropping at the same time a few lines in his favor to our Senator M r Barbour. I sincerely wish something proper in itself could be done for him. He needs it and deserves it. The law terminating...
Your favorable recommendation of Mr. Coxe has interested me much in his behalf And I have already pressed his claims on the President who entertains for him a high respect and possesses every disposition to do something for him the first favorable opportunity. You will see by the papers that on yesterday the resolution for the admission of Missouri passed the Senate 26 to 18. Mr. Macon (as my...
I beg leave to address to you an English history of the late war, with a few critical notes by myself. It has many merits. My opinion of it is fairly set forth in the advertisement prefixed: but I would be gratified to receive yours in the most conscientious sincerity; and especially of the character of so much as I have appended to the British performance. I would respectfully request that...