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1The Madison Family Tree (Madison Papers)
This family tree, framed under glass, is in LC: Madison Miscellany. For reasons given below, JM could hardly have prepared the chart earlier than the close of 1813 or later than September 1819. He apparently left among his papers at the time of his death a brief statement about his forebears. This document, now lost, came into the possession of his niece, Mrs. Lucie Hartwell Conway. She...
Letter not found. 1817. Offered for sale by William R. Benjamin in The Collector: A Magazine for Autograph and Historical Collectors , Catalogue No. 168 (1902), 115. Described as a two-page autograph letter, signed, with the following extract: “Speaks of his article on Madison’s administration. ‘It constitutes a brief and conclusive vindication of yourself and your cabinet from the charges so...
The petition of George Williams of Philadelphia respectively Shows That Christopher Oates & Benjamin Colley, Merchants of Sheffield trading under the firm of Oates Holley Shipped five casks & one linnek of merchandise to your petitioner in the year 1811 under the following circumstances. The Invoice of the Said Shipment was dated the 14th. of November 1810 and the bill of lading Signed the...
You will not think it arrogant if it is suggested that until perfection becomes a human priviledge we shall always be indebted to experience for that course which will best subserve publick purposes; & when experience points out every honest Man walks in the path. The Money paid for the faithful discharge of the duties of Office; is presumed to be a complete equivalent therefor. All the...
We take the liberty to inform you of our sad misfortunes, confined in Cuba Prison, at the inhuman mercy of the cruel Spaniards. Our first misfortunes are as follow: Our vessels being sold for the purpose of privateering, we were obliged to take passage in the schooner Margaretta, Peter Anchor, commander, bound to Jamaica. To our sorrow, after being on the passage two days, the Captain brought...
We come, Sir, on behalf of the Citizens of Washington, to mingle our congratulations with our regrets at your political retirement; congratulations that spring from our participation as Americans in the untarnished glory that accompanies you—regrets that flow from feelings alive to the loss we are so soon to experience. At this event, as Citizens of a great community, we feel a pride only...
I am much indebted to the Citizens of Washington, in whose behalf you speak, for the expressions of regard and respect addressed to me. These sentiments are the more valuable to me, as my long residence among them has made me well acquainted with their many titles to my esteem, at the same time that it has enabled them to mark more particularly the course of my public and personal conduct....
The magnificent spectacle which a voluntary retirement from the most exalted station, furnishes, is this day exemplified in you. Elevated by the suffrages of a free people to the highest office in their gift, the termination of the constitutional term found you in possession of their unabated confidence, which they expressed by a repetition of their will that you should continue to preside...
Give me leave to Congratulate you on the success of your Administration, and to accept of my best wishes for your present & futer Happiness, being well persuaded you retire from the cares of State with the full approbation of your own consience. Presumeing you may have some moments of lieusure, let me draw your attention to a class of men who have supported the measures of Goverment dureing 10...
We come, Sir, on behalf of the Citizens of Washington, to mingle our congratulations with our regrets at your political retirement; congratulations that spring from our participation as Americans in the untarnished glory that accompanies you. Regrets that flow from feelings alive to the loss we are soon to experience. At this event, as Citizens of a great community, we feel a pride only...
J. Madison presents his respects to Mr. Colman with his thanks for the “Century Sermon,[”] he has been so good as to inclose with his letter of the 21st. Ult. Mrs. Madison is equally thankful for the Copy of Mr. Buckminster’s Sermons presented to her. Neither of us can at present avail ourselves of the pleasure of perusing the publications: but a very short time will relieve us both from the...
Altho’ your personal and official acquaintance with Mr. J Graham, be well known to me, I can not, on the occasion of my final departure fr⟨om⟩ the public service, satisfy myself, without expressing my sense of his great merit. Mr. Graham, recommended by my knowlege of his public Agency abroad, and of his private virtues, was invited into the Department of State, as the Chief under the Head of...
I recd. some days ago your favor of the 26 ult: but this is the first moment I have found to acknowlege it. I learn with great pleasure your intention to publish the life and writings of your father. The latter will be a rich addition to our political and literary treasures: and the former a portrait worthy of a conspicuous place in the biographical Gallery. I think too favorably of the public...
I take the Liberty of enclosing you a prospectus of a Reading Room for the Metropolis of the Union upon an improved plan, and respectfully to solicit your patronage for the Institution. From the countenace at present shewn to the undertaking, the establishment promises soon to be in a prosperous condition. In retirement from public life—I pray you may enjoy health, with the pleasing...
Besey calling on me for some seed allows me just time to write a line, to await your arrival at home, requesting your attendance as a visitor of our proposed college on Tuesday the 8th. of April, being the day after our election. You will of course, I am in hopes come here the day or evening before, that we may have some previous consultation on the subject. I shall also request Genl. Cocke &...
Besey calling on me for some seed allows me just time to write a line, to await your arrival at home, requesting your attendance as a visitor of our proposed college on Tuesday the 8 th of April, being the day after our election. you will of course, I am in hopes come here the day or evening before, that we may have some previous consultation on the subject. I shall also request Gen l Cocke &...
Your two favors of the 8 & 25 ult: were duly recd. The memoir in the former was put into the hands of Mr. Sampson who I found had both a personal & patriotic acquaintance with you, and who employed all his strength in pulling down the errors opposed to our Cotton Manufacturies. The paper in the other letter, was also communicated to him. The last under a blank cover was recd. too late to be...
It is with the hope, that I may be permitted without the imputation of vanity, to convey in this manner to Mr. & Mrs. Madison, upon their retireing to the pleasing scenes of private life, my most sincere wishes, that they may both long enjoy every felicity, which this world can possibly afford; and to beg they will have the goodness to be assured, that although, I have not on particular...
On a long list of epistolary debts which I could not attend to, during the period of my public duties, is your favor containing explanations relating to “A Journal of a young man &c.” I beg leave now to thank you for that mark of your attention. The reception given by the public to the work is the best evidence of its interesting character; and a perusal of a part of it only, a sufficient one...
Letter not found. Ca. 16 March 1817. Offered for sale in Anderson Catalogue No. 958 (9–10 May 1912), item 161, where it is described as being an extract of a letter “to the author of ‘Historical Sketches of the Late War’ thanking him for the book, and praising the work.” Also offered for sale in Harmers of New York, Sale 2858 (12 June 1990), item 20, where it is noted the envelope was...
I have to acknowledge the receipt of your favour with its inclosure and shall attend to your commands as soon as the work is published. The deviation from the rule you have adopted in regard to publications as you explained to me in your letter impresses me with a high sense of the honor conferred on my work. I entertain well grounded hopes that the American discovery of a new principle of...
I have recd. yours of with the preceding one on the same subject. I sincerely wish the success to your Biographical Undertaking which your exertions merit; both for your own sake, and for the gratification it is capable of affording to the Public. But having not yet perused the half volume I possess, I can not say more than was said in the few lines heretofore dropt you. In truth, considering...
Your letter of Feby 6th Covering the Resolution & address of the General Assembly did not reach me till the 18th instant. I request the favor of you to communicate the enclosed answer, and accept assurances of my high respect. I have receivd from his Excellency the Lieutenant Governor your address of Feby. 4. with the sensibility due to the kind expressions which distinguish it. Although I...
Mr. Birkbeck, a very extensive, and one of the most scientific and best practical agriculturalists of England, not liking the present state of things here, and having a very exalted opinion of our Country, and being also a great admirer of its political institutions, has determined to remove to and settle in it with his Family. Knowing your partiality for agriculture, I take the liberty of...
Actuated by the influence of respect for your private Character as a Citizen retiring from public duty to enjoy the Sweet reflection of a life spent in the Service of Your Country; though a Stranger I hope you will pardon my presumption in thus intruding this Epistle on Your attention— Have you a Son !! the prop of your declining years! the hope of your illustrious house!! Such a one once was...
Permit me to trouble you with the perusal of the enclos’d copy of a letter, I have this day written to the Secretary of the Navy to remove, in case you have decided on my Claim, any unfavorable impressions on your mind, which a knowledge of the circumstances alluded to, in the enclos’d communication may have made. As an Officer of the American Navy I most assuredly have felt the highest...
I cannot take my final leave of Washington, without calling to mind the epistolary debt remaining due to you. On consulting with Mr. Monroe some time ago, it was understood that your stay in Holland would be prolonged untill next fall, if not next Spring, by a joint negociation with the Govt. of the Netherlands, on the subject of a commercial Treaty. You will have received the communications...
Notwithstanding the lapse of time, nothing definitive has taken place, in concert with Mr. Hassler, in relation to Mr. Le Sueur. Mr. Crawford has the subject in hand, and will communicate the result. I can add but little to the public information which goes to you from the official source, and thro’ the press. You will find that specie is at length re-instated in its legitimate functions; at...
Yours on the subject of Mr. Brewer was duly received, and would alone have been a sufficient evidence of his worth. It would have been very agreeable, if it could have been rewarded by such an appointment as he wished, consistently with the pretensions of others, & with the collateral considerations which necessarily turn the scale, where there may be an equilibrium of qualifications. Had the...
While gratitude fills and warms, the breast of a great and grateful people, whose feelings of regret at your departure from office, their late, great, reverd president, are consonant to the sublime thought of the eloquent Moore. “As the sunflower turns to her God when she sets, “The same form that she turn’d when she rose. Free’d from those arduous cares, could you feel leisure to attend to...
Mr Capellano has decided to make you a visit at Montpellier in the course of the summer. He says he does not like to be hurried in a Work of this nature. In making you a visit he might extend his journey to Mr Jeffersons of whom we have no good bust. He will conform to your convenience, I presume before or after harvest will be most agreeable to you. I have the honor to be with great respect...
For value received, I promise to pay to James Madison Esqr. or order Seven thousand, five hundred Dollars with Interest on demand. Richard Cutts Received of James Madison Esqr Flour [ sic ] thousand Dollars to be accounted for RC ( NjP : Crane Collection); Tr ( DLC ); Tr ( DLC : Dolley Payne Madison Papers). RC in Richard Cutts’s hand. On the verso of the RC
I have recd. yours of Mar. 27. inclosing a copy of a letter to the Secy. of the Navy of the same date. In answer to it I have to observe merely that, on the statement of the case as originally made to me, I expressed or acquiesced in the opinion that under the circumstances of it, you could not be re-instaled in the Station at Charlestown, by the removal of Capt: Hull. The new matter on which...
Having been detained in Washington untill the 6th. inst. I did not reach home till Tuesday night, and of course too late to comply with the arrangement notified in yours of the 10th. March by Bizet. I take for granted that the other Visitors met, and that for the present at least my attendance will not be needed. As it has always been our purpose to pay a visit to Monticello at no distant day...
The interval between the date and the transmission of the inclosed was occasioned first by the extreme hurry in which the communications from you found me, & finally by the reflection that as the Legislature had adjourned, the delay was immaterial. At the next session, there will be nothing to call their attention to the circumstance, and this explanation will I hope be an apology for it to...
Having been detained in Washington untill the 6 th inst. I did not reach home till Tuesday night, and of course too late to comply with the arrangement notified in yours of the 10 th March by Bizet . I take for granted that the other Visitors met, and that for the present at least my attendance will not be needed. As it has always been our purpose to pay a visit to Monticello at no distant day...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. A detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr. Watson being sick, only Genl. Cocke, mr. Cabell and myself met. Altho’ not a...
Your letter of Feb. 15. having given me the hope you would attend the meeting of the Visitors of the Central college near Charlottesville I lodged one for you at Montpelier notifying that our meeting would be on the day after our April court. a detention at Washington I presume prevented your attendance, and mr Watson being sick, only Gen l Cocke , mr Cabell
I sincerely congratulate you on your release from incessant labors, corroding anxieties, active enemies & interested friends, & on your return to your books & farm, to tranquility & independance. A day of these is worth ages of the former, but all this you know. Yours of the 10th. was delivered to me yesterday. Mine of the 13th. had been sent off the moment it was written. We are made happy by...
I sincerely congratulate you on your release from incessant labors, corroding anxieties, active enemies & interested friends, & on your return to your books & farm, to tranquility & independance. a day of these is worth ages of the former. but all this you know. yours of the 10 th was delivered to me yesterday. mine of the 13 th had been sent off the moment it was written. we are made happy by...
The Speech of Mr. Monroe reached town yesterday, and is in the Chronicle of this morning. I suppose it is an Error of the Press that states the Commencement of the Revolution almost 40 years ago, and that it should be almost two & forty, contemplating the 19th Inst. —it is more than 40 since the declaration of Independence. But the felicitation that follows in this Paragraph is so much at...
The Lupinella seed has just arrived in a packet from Baltimore. I have the honor to enclose you a parcel of it. In Italy it is sown, or planted in March, and October, in high dry land, and in three years enriches the poorest soil so that it will bring two successive crops of wheat abundantly. The description which I have recd. of it, is not very perfect, but it contains all the information...
I beg leave to send you, enclosed, a few English newspapers. I have not been able to look over them myself, but perhaps you may be able to glean an hours amusement from them. They are the latest we have in the office. I shall have great pleasure in sending you others that arrive. Our last letters from Mr Adams are to the 29th of January. He takes no notice of the report of 19 ships of war...
As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron, the Duke de la Rochefaucoult, as well as the “New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one center genuine...
As I can make no Apology for so long forgetting to return the Volumes inclosed, I must, without qualification beg your Pardon. This Work, tho’ it bears the name of Condorcet alone was understood to be written in concert between him and his great Patron the Duke de La Rochefaucoult, as well as [“]The New Heaven,” and several other publications in favour of a Government in one Center genuine...
I was highly gratified by the perusal of your message at the opening of Congress; but indeed one well might say how could it be other-wise, when even the Editors of the Times and of the Courier , with an host of others equally hostile to you, acknowleged its merits. I now see you have returned to Montpelier, where I wish you the enjoyment of every comfort: and where I have already commenced...
I duly recd. the English papers you were so good as to send me; and which I now return. Altho’ less interesting than they usually are even when the Parliament is not in session, they contain some things which were worth looking at; and I thank you for the opportunity of doing it. We reached our home without accident, and in the computed time. I found the agricul[t]ural prospects in this...
Letter not found. 23 April 1817, Montpelier. Described as a one-page autograph letter, signed, in Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 873 (20–21 Feb. 1902), item 204.
I have recd. my dear Sir, Your favor of the 18, with the Lupinella Seed, for which I thank you. I will endeavor to make the most of it by sowing a part now, and the rest in October. It will be a valuable acquisition, if it has half the merit ascribed to it. The British affairs appear to be approaching if not already in a paroxism, which but for the horrors of the Revolutionary experiment in...
The acting Secretary of War has advised me of your ability to supply the United States with a quantity of Stocks for Muskets, and also of his having intimated that the price would not exceed thirty Cents each. By a reference to the Contracts hitherto executed and the proposals recently received from Baltimore, it appears that the uniform and fixed price is twenty five Cents for each approved...