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  • Author

    • Trist, Nicholas P.
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    • Madison, James
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    • post-Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Trist, Nicholas P." AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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Our friend Mr Terrell is now among us, on a farewell visit, preparatory to his removal to New Orleans, whither he goes in the fall. During this visit, he desires much to put into execution his long deferred pilgrimage to Montpellier; and in compliance with this wish, I shall take the liberty of guiding his footsteps thither some time before the close of the month. During Mr Jefferson’s life, I...
With a caution that my slowness and total inexperience in the duties of which the board of Visitors tender me the discharge, will probably call for a full measure of indulgence; and with the grateful feelings which the mark of confidence is calculated to inspire, I accept the opportunity of trying myself in the office of their Secretary. In relation to the catalogue, as my motive in...
Your letter found me engaged with the papers relating to Mr Jefferson’s memoir. As I could not therefore immediately attend to it without pretermitting these; and as the time for communicating the report was distant enough to admit of a little delay, I contented myself with sending you word, through Mrs Randolph, that it had come to hand & should receive the earliest attention in my power to...
You should have heard from me some time since, but for the prospect held out by the arrival of the measurer from Philadelphia, of an early completion of the business in which he was to be engaged, and consequently of the information that I was to communicate. As the enclosed note from the proctor will show, the delay has been without the fruit I expected. It is in answer to one from me...
When I came to make a copy of the report, I was stopped at the first step, by the want of a caption. How was this difficulty to be got over? I could not communicate with you on the subject, without a loss of time that might add still more to the delay of the report. I have determined therefore on the following course. To transpose a portion of body upon the shoulders—thus making a head of...
The first thing to be done after the adjournment of the Board, was to make up the record & copy off all those long enactments of Mr Johnson. This I commenced on the succeeding day, & was occupied by, pretty closely, till the Thursday ensuing. Then I went immediately, to the university, where Mr Lomax & myself commenced our joint labours of digesting the enactments, which we got through by...
My indisposition was of short duration: Dr Dunglison’s prescription dispelling the fever & other unpleasant circumstances with which it was attended, in three or four days. So that on the thursday succeeding, the weather having moderated, I was enabled to go out. The printing, I am sorry to say however, goes on not very rapidly; at least had not done so last week. Mr McKennie told me that he...
This mail conveys to you two copies of the enactments, which have been delayed so long. You will be surprised to learn that I have taken upon myself to send on the report without them: this went by last sunday’s mail. On meeting Genl. Cocke early in the week of the sale, he immediately enquired about the report, & expressed great surprise & concern at the answer. "What! not yet . Bless my...
I send, with the request that they be returned when you shall have done with them, a couple of Harmony papers, containing some articles on the subject of gymnastics. The flattering reports brought up by Genl. Cocke on the prospects of further assistance from the legislature, and the consequent probability that it will be in the power of the Bd. to do something on the subject, has revived my...
I have determined to send you also a No of the Westminster, containing another article on gymnastics which tends to convey an idea of the importance which the subject had, at that date, already acquired in England. In my note of yesterday evening, I forgot to mention, as it had been my intention to do, that several circumstances have reduced to an almost certainty in my mind the fixed design...
I now return you the paper containing Mr Hassler’s publication, which, so very slight was my previous knowledge of him, has given me more insight into his character than I before possessed. It breathes, I think, the tone of worth and of true science; but the wide difference must not be lost sight of, between a skilful, and perfectly scientific astronomer , and a good mathematician ; nor that...
I owe you many apologies for so late an acknowledgment of your kind favor of the 2. inst.; but it was postponed some days unavoidably; and then, by the daily expectation of learning Mr Key’s final decision, which to the very last, I entertained some hope would be such as I wished. There is considerable intimacy subsisting between Mrs D. & Mrs K, by means of which I had derived some knowledge...
Intending to answer your favor of the 27th. by that mail, I went up on Saturday afternoon, to the University. But Mr Brockenbrough could nowhere be found, to get from him the key of the apartment where the papers were locked up. I was near being equally unfortunate yesterday; for one of the members of the Jefferson Society to whom I traced the key, had gone out & did not return till the...
Stepping into the post office to put my letter in, I am pleased to find the enclosed left here for distribution. It so happened that it was my intention to say something in my letter, on this very subject, in connexion with one of the transactions at the last meeting, and an account I have since heard of Mr Maxwell’s Speech at HampdenSydney, in which he triumphantly foretold that they (the...
Calling by here in haste this morning, I am met by Mr Brockenbrough who calls me into his office, to show me the enclosed. They are on a Subject of such deep interest, that I have asked his permission to send to you the letter addressed to himself. It may turn out a God send. You will judge of the expediency for obtaining the opinion of Bowditch & of Farrar; and of using every effort to close...
I owe many apologies for this tardy acknowledgment of your favor of last month. Several causes have contributed to this remissness, but the chief of these is the paradoxical one of that extreme punctuality which you persist in observing towards me, which has been the cause of a compunctious visitation every time that it has been displayed, and which therefore, honestly and sincerely, I do not...
Mr Willard of Roxbury near Boston, who has come on to the University with the large clock of which he is maker, is desirous on his return, to avail himself of the first and last opportunity that will ever offer for paying his respects to you; and I accordingly take the liberty of giving him this introduction. With profound respect Your obedt. Servt. RC ( ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book)....
My delay in writing has been greater than you probably expected when we parted or than I intended; but I am not altogether without apology for it. In the first place, making up the record took me three days. A fourth was entirely taken up by some business which did not admit of postponement; and subsequently, three others by an indisposition somewhat of the nature of that from which you are...
Your favor of the 23d. was not received until last night. I had been thinking some time, that I ought to have long ago written to you on the subject; and now feel ashamed that a letter from you should have found the design yet unaccomplished. The matter shall, however, be immediately attended to: that is, as soon as little piece of business which the same mail brought from Mr Coolidge on...
Owing to my not attending Court on Monday I did not receive your favor of the 3d. till the next day. Nothing has reached me concerning the papers you enquire after. I think it not unlikely, however, that Mr Sparks may have entrusted them to Mr. Hilliard of Boston, who set out thence some weeks since, & has been daily looked for for a good while. When he arrives, I shall ask if nothing was put...
I commenced making the separation of those you have not seen. This has taken me so much longer than I expected, although I have looked at each letter only long enough to ascertain that it was from you, that I must postpone the rest of this work & hurry to town. RC ( ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book).
Much occupation of one kind or another, together with the knowledge that all you desired was to send in the report in time for the meeting of the legislature, have caused me to postpone taking up the subject until today. On doing so, I found so many points on which it seemed necessary to touch, that it became obvious it would give you less trouble to frame a report yourself, than to correct...
You will find in No. 3 (as marked by me) some new details respecting your early career, as well as that of Mr Jefferson. I send Nos 1. & 2. as introductory: The letters from R. D. O., I mean--which are marked with //. You will perceive that the clergy are seriously—many of them conscientiously ,—bent on organising a "Christian Party in politics." We may yet be destined in this country to a...
Under the head "Marriage & Placement," is a very curious & interesting fact, if it be a fact--and of this there can be but little doubt; for the writer, besides his devotion to Truth, is cautious withal. Please re-enclose the paper to RC (ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book).
Under the uncertainty of finding the document you wish, in Washington, I have availed myself of its existence in one of the volumes of Anas, to take the annexed copy. Have you noticed in the report, (at the commencement) the expession "as unprofitable to the adventurers, as important to the public." Mrs Trist is writing a note which will inform you of our pleasant journey—I trust to find, on...
The enclosed letter, I received yesterday evening, and hasten to forward to you, as well as my reply, which is subjoined. From these data, you will be able to judge what will be the intentions of the members in Richmond after the receipt of my letter; as they will have it in their power to judge of your probable decision under all the circumstances which have occurred. Dec. 5. "At the momt. of...
In the expectation of finding there a letter from Mr Coolidge, I rode to the post=office yesterday, and was not disappointed. From this, I give you the following extracts. Speaking of Mr W. he says "he is, I have no doubt, fitted for the place, though I should not suppose him equal at present to Bonnycastle or Key." "If Jones does not accept, or leaves you, I should recommend to appoint W. He...
My conscience has been reproaching me for some time past with my remissness towards you; and yet something has occurred every day to protract it until this late date. My expectation, when I last wrote, of hearing again from Mr Coolidge within a post or two, was not realised, and I left home on some business at Powhatan court house without doing so. On my return, I was still disappointed; & the...
I am utterly ashamed of myself for having kept you waiting so long for letters which you have, doubtlessly, been impatient to receive; and this shame is the greater from the delicacy which has prevented your jogging my memory on the subject. The only excuse I have to offer, is the procrastination forced on me by the multiplicity of agenda constantly before my eyes; & the forgetfulness which...
You will perceive in the accompanying paper, one of your ideas thrown into print. The origin of this piece was as follows. Being in Charlottesville on business, I was asked by Mr. Wood of that plase to dinner; & found there, among others, Mr Bonnycastle & Mr Davis the Editor. Among other things, the advocate’s attack on Mr Rush was brought upon the carpet; and Mr B., qui se mêle d’économie...
He continues to live in the Nth Pavilion— Her appartment is in future to be occupied conjointly with one or more of her daughters. It is positively determined both by herself & every one of her children that they are never again to occupy the same apartment. This arrangement secures almost every thing that was desirable, and makes my continuance here far less necessary. Moreover his disease...
I have been expecting in every mail for a week past, an answer to a letter I wrote you on the 18th instant; and I begin to fear that it has either miscarried, or found you unwell. It was to apologise for my long neglect of your wishes on the subject of the remaining letters from you to Mr Jefferson, & to apprise you that they were at length separated from the books in which they had been sewn,...
To my great mortification, I learn this evening that Mr Randolph left Edge-hill after dinner, for Montpellier. His intention to spend the night with Dr Page, gives me hopes however, that A messenger setting out before day may reach there before he sets out, & retrieve the opportunity. With a view to multiply the chances in their favor, I have made copies of two of your letters which, from...
The servant overtook Mr R So that you received your tardy letters yesterday evening. I here send the copies mentioned in the letter which accompanied them. When you next write, please mention whether my letters of the 11. 18. 29. have come to hand; & also a newspaper in which I carelessly enclosed a scrawl which, for various reasons, I should not like to have fallen into the hands of...
Called to Charlottesville on business, I stop a moment, to send you an extract from a few lines just received from Mr Coolidge. "I have never received any letter from Mr. Madison. The papers he alluded to were sent him by Col. Storrow, from Mr Sparks. This is my impression." This Col. S. is a Virginian who visited Boston last season. Your favors of the 1t. & 7th. both came safe to hand. The...
I have to acknowledge your two favors of the 8th & 27th instant. The last came to hand yesterday evening, too late to be answered effectually (the papers being at the University) by this morning’s mail; and you will, in consequence, not receive the copy you desire, till wednesday: a delay from which I hope no inconvenience will result. For the account of the London University, which is an...
A steady rain all day yesterday prevented my going to the University then. The hour at which the mail closes just allows me time to send you a copy of the Contract with Mr Long —which I have selected, thinking it might be the one you have occasion for—The others are in substance the same. If copies of them are wanted, please drop me a line to that effect. Affectionately, Your very devoted...
I have searched the papers here in vain, for the power of attorney; and it will be impossible to return to Monticello and get back, in time for to-day’s post. You may expect to hear from me again, by the next. Meanwhile, with thanks for the English papers, accept my affectionate salutations RC ( ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book). Docketed by James Madison.
My search among the papers here, has proved equally ineffectual. I shall see Mr Gilmer to-day, however; and, ascertaining from him where his late uncle’s papers are, obtain that in question with as little delay as possible. I was sorry to learn, on further enquiry, that the report concerning Mr Wirtembaker is unfounded: he certainly remains, I am told, during the next session. Perhaps,...
Taking the white sheet in which the papers were wrapped, for a mere envelope; I did not notice your "iterum", until I came to put away my letters, after my last to you was despatched. The extract you desire, is now enclosed. Mr Gilmer’s information leaves it uncertain whether the contract be in this county, or with his uncle, in Liberty. To the latter, I shall write by the first mail. In the...
On going over to Edge-hill yesterday, I learned that the letter you wrote for a copy of, sometime ago, had afterwards been found & copied, but not sent. Although apprehensive that your patience will have become exhausted, & that therefore it will arrive too late for the purpose intended; I lose no time in sending it. With affectionate adieux RC ( ViHi : Nicholas P. Trist Album Book).
I should not have been so tardy in acknowledging your two favors of the 23 and 30th ulto, and returning my thanks for the newspapers by which they were accompanied, but for the reason that I will now explain. I had conceived a project in which, when brought to a certain stage of completion, it was my intention to beg your counsel & assistance. This project was nothing less than to write a...
If the price of tickets be reduced from $50 to $30 a piece on the student’s taking two whole tickets, what will be the corresponding reduction on his taking one ticket & 15/50 of another ? The answer is furnished by this proportion Two tickets, are to The reduction operated by them on the price of each, as 1 & 15/50, is to The reduction operated by them on the price of the whole ticket. 2: 20...
The two packets containing your letter to Mr Eppes, and those from Mr Hassler, came to hand in due course of mail: the contents of the former were immediately forwarded to Lynchburg, Mr E’s post-office; those of the latter, placed among the papers of the board. I write now for the purpose of saying--lest you should be deterred by the late event--that you are expected to establish yourselves...
Immediately after the adjournment of the Board, Mr Lomax called to enquire whether they had made any order in relation to the incongruities in the prices of Professors’ tickets unconsciously introduced by the enactment establishing fifteen dollar fees for attendance on the classes of Medical Jurisprudence, Political economy, &c. On being informed that No order had been made on the subject, he...
Your kind favor with the accompanying papers, from which I have made several interesting extracts, was duly received. I have made enquiries concerning the individual in question, formerly a student here, of Drs Dunglison & Blaettermann & Mr Bonnycastle. He was not a pupil of the first named gentleman, but the Dr was acquainted with his character: "very stupid & had done himself no sort of...
The packet which goes by the same mail contains, I believe, all the papers you desired me to send. I enclose a copy of the only resolution which it is necessary you should at once have under your eye: one of the journal, at length, I will send as soon as I can make it out. The acceptance of Dr Patterson which you will see noticed in today’s advocate, we have from Dr. Dunglison, who got a...
Yours of the 11th finds me this morning on the point of setting out, in company with Dr Dunglison, on a visit to Genl. Cocke, which I have been promising for two or three years. On Mr. Tracie’s account, I at first hesitated whether I should give up the trip, which the delay of going to the University where his papers are would have obliged me to abandon altogether; but on reflection, I have...
When I dispatched the packet containing the papers of Mr Tracie, last week, it was in such a hurry as not to allow me time to accompany it by a single line. Dr Patterson came up from Richmond on the monday previous to the opening of the session. Mr Tucker arrived on the same day, in the northern stage. In the sentiments expressed at the dinner to Dr P, you will have noticed what struck me as...
A letter just received from Mr Monroe, betrays the erroneous impression that the first monday--whereas it is the first day--was appointed for the meeting of the Board; and, lest the other members should be labouring under the same mistake, I have lost no time in calling their attention to the subject. The students at the University have not yet reached one hundred. Dr P. evinces several...