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I hope you have enjoyed good health since your safe return home, and that Mrs. Madison has been equally fortunate. You have, I doubt not, found sufficient occupation in domestic concerns, to interest you. Notices from this quarter, will for a while, judging from my own experience, rather interrupt a cherished tranquility, than give pleasure. I should now write you a long letter, if I did not...
I enclose you the letter to Mrs Madison, which I omitted to take with me on my late visit, as I intimated to you, while at your house. Mr Correa came here, the day after I set out on my late trip. This visit was to counteract the anticipated mov’ments of the Pernambuco, ambassador, whose arrival, he was taught to expect from accounts receivd thence. No such person has yet arrivd. Mr. C. has...
I am so far on my route westward, after having extended my tour to the East, as far as Portland, whence I return’d to Dover in N Hamshire, & came thence, by Concord, & Hanover, into Vermont, at windsor, & by montpelier, & Burlington to this place. I visited yesterday Rouse’s point, which is within a few hundred yards of the boundary line. I met her⟨e⟩ Genl Brown, and to morrow we proceed,...
Our carriage arrivd sooner, somedays, than we expected, in consequence of which, and other considerations, connected with affrs at Washington (our horses also hir’d), I am forc’d to hurry on there. It was our intention to have been with you last night, but hearing that Mr Bagot is with you, we are under the necessity, on account of our equipment, our baggage being sent on, by Richmond, to...
I have been since my return here, so incessantly engaged in the most interesting business, that I have not had a moment to say any thing to you. I am now engaged in preparing the message for Congress, whose meeting is so near at hand, that I shall I fear be badly prepard. The question respecting canals & roads is full of difficulty, growing out of what has passd on it. After all the...
You know so much of the nature of the pressure, to which I am subjected, at this time, that you will excuse my not giving an earlier answer to your letter of the 9th. The documents relating to Galvestown & amelia Island, publishd in this days paper, will reach you with this. They shew the reasons which operated with the Executive in taking the measure noticd in your letter. They appear’d to be...
In the proceedings of Congress there is little interesting as yet. Some question will probably be brought forward respecting the affrs. of the Spanish colonies, in some form, with intention to bring into discussion, the conduct of the government towards them, thro’ the whole of their contest with Spain, & more particularly within the last year. The recognition of Buenos Ayres, as an indept...
The late session, considering the flourishing & happy condition of the country, has been unusually oppressive on every branch of the Executive dept. There have been more calls for information, than I recollect to have been made at any former session, and in some instances, with a portion of the H. of R. a very querulous spirit has been manifested. The questions, involving the right in...
I send you within two papers which will give you the most full & correct information of the views of the allies respecting So. America, that we possess; I mean more particularly that which bears date at Moscow. Its authenticity may be relied on, as we are assur’d, by Mr Erving, by a later letter, than that which accompanied it. You will keep both till we meet, but when that will be, I cannot...
I had the pleasure to see Mr Todd, just before I came here, and requestd him to inform you, that some delay would necessarily occur, before I could leave the city for the summer. That I should remain here, till we heard from Genl. Jackson, on which I should return to the city, then back here, & then proceed by your house to Albemarle. In truth, besides the motive for delay, to avail my self of...
I have this moment receivd yours of the 17., & shall do every thing in my power, to reach your house, by the day mentiond, tho’ I have little hope of it. We have met every day, one excepted, since my arrival here, on the business of the Spanish posts taken in Florida by Genl Jackson. Onis has demanded whether they were taken by order of the govt.? if not, that they be surrender’d & the Genl....
I shall not be able to get from this place so soon as I expected. You well know how much is to be attended to at such a time preparatory to my departure from the city. I send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, which will unfold to you, our views on the whole subject. I wish you to shew this paper, & the Russian document to Mr Jefferson, in confidence, when you see him. Your friend RC (...
I find that I omitted to send you a copy of my letter to Genl Jackson, yesterday, as I intended, & therefore, now enclose it. Perhaps I have sent some other paper, in which case be so good as to retain it till we meet. Sincerely yours RC ( DLC ).
The enclosed from Mr Rush, will give you a view of our present relations with England. Retain them till we meet, which I expect will be next week. The meeting of the visitors, is to be, I understand, then, in which, we shall expect to see you, if not we shall have the pleasure of se[e]ing you at your own house as we go to Washington, which we propose doing next week. We hope that you are all...
I had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 2d. yesterday. We shall set out to morrow & be with you the day after. I am much pushd by many important concerns to get to Washington as soon as possible, but will certainly remain a day with you. Mr Crowninshield has resignd, & that dept., suffers, most essentially in some interesting circumstances. I have thoughts of offering it to Mr Snider...
The enclosed from Mr Rush, which you will return at your leisure, gives the latest intelligence from England, except what is containd in a statment from Mr Maury, of the gradual augmentation of our shipping, beyond that of G. B., in the trade between this country & G. B. I send you a copy of the documents relating to our affrs. with Spain, from a distant date to the last session inclusive....
General King of the district of Maine in Massachusetts, being desirous, of making you a visit, I take much pleasure in promoting his wishes by giving him this introduction to you. His steady & firm attachment to the principles of our govt., & support of it, in the late war, by very meritorious services, are known to you. I hope that you derive no inconvenience from this severe attack of cold...
I believe I now send you the document you asked for, in the form, you wished it. Mr Gallatin & Mr Rush have formd a treaty with G Britain, by which the commercl. convention is continued for 10. years, the questions of boundary & fisheries are settled, as is that respecting slaves taken in the late war, & Columbia river, but on what conditions, we know not, as the treaty is not yet receivd. The...
A most afflicting event occurrd yesterday, the death of Genl. A: Mason, killd in a duel by Mr McCarty. They fought with muskets. The distress is universal & deep, proceeding from regret at the loss of the highly respected & meritorious individual, & the terrible example it exhibits of party feuds. The debate respecting the proceedings in Florida is still depending, tho’ it is probable that it...
Mr Vaughan, with whose character you are I presume well acquainted, left this city lately on a visit to Mr Jefferson, & yourself, by Norfolk & Richmond, having much desire to see him once more, & to become personally acquainted with you, before, he returns to Kennebeck in Maine, to remain stationary the residue of his days. He was the confidential friend of the M. of Landsdowne & Dr Franklin...
I receiv’d at Washington your letters respecting Mr. Lehre, Mr R. B. Lee & Mr Scott, and in consequence of the pressure of business there, declind answering them, untill after my arrival here. I had made up my opinion while in So. Car: in favor of Mr Pringle, who is a republican, President of the State Senate, and without being a very popular man, respected by all. The opposing candidates were...
I have been endeavouring, while here, to settle my administration on the estate of our friend the late Judge Jones, and believe that I shall accomplish it. The settlement of my account with the estate, is ⟨necessarily?⟩ involvd in the other, & in recurring to former transaction[s], I find, that I must give you, some little trouble in the affair. The two papers enclosed, will explain the...
I receivd your kind letter, with the information, respecting my acct., with the estate of our late friend Mr. Jones, the day after my meeting with the Commissrs.; but they admitted the item on a view of the passage in Mr Yards letter relating to it, & my assurance, that I would withdraw it, if it should not be supported by you. Your letter will be very satisfactory to them, without even a copy...
I send you a copy of the message which has just been sent in to Congress. The affair with Spain has been plac’d on the best ground, that great consideration had suggested, and we hope that it may be managed, in a manner, to secure the object desir’d, without war. I have reason to think, that the efforts of several powers, will be exerted, on that side; those of France, certainly will be; and...
I send you herewith the principal documents which have been printed since the commencment of the Session. Should any be omitted, or should there be any information on any point not touched by them, which you may desire, or [ sic ] being so advised, I will communicate it. The Missouri question, as it is call’d, still engages the attention of Congress, & will probably do it, much longer. The...
I send you by this days mail a copy of the journal of the convention which formd the fedl. constitution. One is allowed by the act of Congress to yourself, to Mr Jefferson & to Mr Adams. Several votes were taken yesterday in the Senate on different propositions, respecting the Missouri question, & it appears that one was adopted by a majority of 4. for the establishment of a line to commence...
Our troubles with Spain are not ended, nor is it possible to say when they will be. It was hoped and presumed that this minister would have been authorisd to settle every difficulty, but it appears that he came, simply, to ask explanations, and report those given to his government, to amuse, and procrastinate as his predecessor had done. He admits that he is personally satisfied, as to the...
¶From James Monroe. Letter not found. 22 September 1820 . Offered for sale in The Collection of Autographs of Hon. James T. Mitchell (Stan. V. Henkels Catalogue No. 731 [1894], 77).
You will receive by this mail a copy of the message in which I have endeavourd, to place our institutions in a just light, comparatively with those of Europe, without looking at the latter, or even glancing at them by any remark. The state of our finances is I presume more favorable, than was generally supposd. It seems probable that it will improve in future, the quantity of goods which...
We have just receivd a letter from Mr Rush of the 20th of october, communicating one from the Spanish ambassador in London to him, of the preceding date, stating that he had been informd confidentially that the Florida treaty had been ratified. It does not appear that the information had been imparted to him, from Madrid or London or by whom. It being possible that it might have been receivd...
The question as to the admission of Missouri into the union, which is still depending, will probably not be decided untill after the holydays, & the decision is then quite uncertain. You have I presume seen a proposition of Dr Eustis, for admitting her, after a certain day, provided, in the interim, the obnoxious clause in her constitution shall be stricken out. Should this fail, it is...
Mr Lawrance & Mr Jones of New York, young gentlemen of merit, well connected there, expressing a wish to visit you & Mr Jefferson, I have felt it due to the introduction they have presented me, to make them known to you. They intend to visit Europe in the Spring, & will I am satisfied, take much interest in bearing any letters from you, or being in any respect useful to you. With great respect...
I regret to have to inform you of the death of Mr Wm. Burwell which took place on yesterday, after a long illness. He was a virtuous man & good member. The treaty with spain has been ratified unconditionally by her govt., & the grants annulld in the instrument of ratification. It is now before the Senate on the question whether it shall be accepted, the time stipulated for the ratification...
Since I have been in this office many newspapers have been sent to me, from every part of the union, unsought, which, having neither time nor curiosity to read, are in effect thrown away. I should have stopped the practice, but from delicacy to the Editors, & expecting also, that they would subject me to no charge. Lately I have been informed that the same practice took place in your time, &...
Had I receiv’d your letter respecting Mr. Robt. Taylor, before the appointment of General Pegram to the office of marshall was made, I would not have hesitated to appoint Mr Taylor. But I knew nothing of his wish on the subject, & being appriz’d by the person who sent forward the resignation of General Moore, that an immediate appointment of his successor, would be necessary, as judge Tucker...
I have had the pleasure to recieve your letter with one from Mr Lee, and regret that you should say one word, as to the necessity you are under to send it, or such papers on to me. I need not assure you that I am always happy to hear from you, and am glad of any occurrence which draws from you a letter. My situation, as you well know, renders it impossible for me to write you often or...
I have had the pleasure to receive your letter of the 6th, and entirely concur in the view which you have taken of both the subjects on which it treats. The uniform conduct of the government, towards the Spanish provinces, has manifested a friendly interest in their favor, without taking a single step, with which the Spanish government had a right to complain, from the commencement of their...
Dr. Wm. Thornton who has long enjoyed your good opinion, has expressed a wish that I would also afford him a testimonial of mine, addressed to some friend, to be retained in his possession. To this request, I have willingly acceded, and have presumed, that it might be agreeable to you, and particularly gratifying to him, that it should be addressed to you. I became acquainted with him, before...
I have been detain’d here longer than I had expected that I should be, but hope & presume that I shall, after attending the court to morrow get as far as Judge Nelson’s in the evening, & be with you tolerably early the next day. I wish you to examine the subject between the Senate & me, respecting military nominations, that we may confer on it when we meet. I send you the material papers, the...
I enclose you a copy of a report of the Committee of the Senate on the nominations respecting which a difference of opinion took place between that body & me, in the manner shewn by its votes in the sequel of the document. The Senate confirmed the nominations in the rank, that is, the grades to which each officer was designated, but rejected the dates from which it was proposed that their...
I send you here with the 10th vol: of the journals of our revolutionary Congress, the one which you intimated, was deficient in your collection. I have a complete set, with several other odd vols., form’d out of my own collection, & that of our old estimable friend Judge Jones, so that if you should want any other, it is probable, I might supply you. I send you also a detailed copy of the...
My affairs in Albemarle, requiring my attendance there, again, before the meeting of Congress, & the Phisician deeming the exercise useful to Mrs Monroe’s health, we have resolvd to set out thither in a few days, & to call on you & Mrs Madison on the route. If we go by Loudon, which is not decided, it may be the last of the week (next) before we see you; but if we go direct, about the middle....
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. 3 February 1823 . Described as a three-page autograph letter, signed, listed for sale in the Charles Hamilton Catalogue No. 103 (24 Feb. 1977), item 161, summarized and abstracted as follows: “dealing with a post for Madison’s nephew, a constitutional matter concerning grants of power in which he is in apparent disagreement both with Madison and...
I expected before this to have had the pleasure of seeing you on my way to Albemarle, but I have not be [ sic ] able to leave the city, as yet, tho’ I expect to do it, to morrow, on a short visit to Loudon, and after returning here to proceed on by your house, to mine in that quarter. The Secretary under the board, instituted under the convention with G. B. relating to the 1st art: of the...
I enclose you such documents mentiond in your memo: as are to be obtaind from the dept. of war. Those to be found, in the Natil. advocate, will be sent as soon as obtaind. There being no file of that paper, in that dept., they must be looked for elsewhere. I have allowed to Mr. Morris, the expence of his journey from Cadiz to Madrid six hundred dolrs., & a like sum to replace him there, &...
¶ From James Monroe. Letter not found. Ca. 9 August 1823. Offered for sale in the American Art Association, Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots American Art Association, Illustrated Catalogue of President Madison’s Correspondence from American Statesmen and Patriots … Collection of the Late Frederick B. McGuire (New York, 1917). , 26 Feb. 1917,...
We came here on thursday last, with intention to proceed on to Albemarle, on Monday next, but such is the state of Mrs. Monroe’s health, that I do not know that it will be possible for her to undertake the journey. The trip here has derangd her whole system, & particularly her nervous system, & head. If she cannot accompany me, I must take her back to Washington, which will be decided in a day...
It is painful for me to pass you, but some private concerns, & particularly the expectation of meeting Mr. Goodwyn, with whom I am in negotiation for the sale of my land, and who was expected there the day before yesterday hurries me on. We will indemnify ourselves on our return, in abt. a fortnight. I do not think it probable, that I shall sell, but I wish to be there as soon as in my power....
The unfavorable state of the weather since my arrival here, has kept me so much confind, that I have been unable, to pay, that attention to my affairs, that I should otherwise have done. I shall however be with you in the course of the insuing week. I send you a letter from Judge Nelson, & two from Mr. Appleton, which give the latest accounts, from them, of affairs in Spain. I send you also,...
Two dispatches have been lately receivd from Mr. Rush, communicating a proposition from Mr Canning, confidentially made to him, of cooperation between our two governments, in opposing, by reciprocal declaration, in the first instance, a project which he thinks exists, of the holy alliance, to invade the So. american states, as soon as the business with Spain is settled, & which he intimates...