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    • Joy, George
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    • Madison, James
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    • post-Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Joy, George" AND Recipient="Madison, James" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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The Speech of Mr. Monroe reached town yesterday, and is in the Chronicle of this morning. I suppose it is an Error of the Press that states the Commencement of the Revolution almost 40 years ago, and that it should be almost two & forty, contemplating the 19th Inst. —it is more than 40 since the declaration of Independence. But the felicitation that follows in this Paragraph is so much at...
I wrote you on ⟨the 17th.⟩ Ult. that Mr: Adams had recd his appointment of Secretary of State, and given notice of his acceptance of it by the Schooner Woodburn for Baltimore. I gave the same information to Doctor Eustis by the following Post; adding that if any movement of his own in consequence of that of Mr: Adams, or otherwise, should occasion a demand for my services pro tempore, I should...
I have already sent you original and duplicate of the enclosed; and I am sorry to say that my Correspondence with Dr. Eustis leaves the question of the appointment to the Consul Generalship of Holland under considerable doubt, which is by no means removed by a Letter he has written Mr: Adams—“Had Mr: Joy been at Rotterdam” he says “he would have had strong Claims; but under the necessity of...
It is so long since I received your last letter, that, tho’ carefully preserved, it is out of my immediate reach; and it would take a longer time to get at it than the occasion requires, seeing it’s substance, as well as that of your more remote Correspondence is too interesting to be at any time beyond my powers of reminiscence. I am greatly obliged by your efforts in my favor; I assure you,...
You shall have no cause to complain of a tardy rejoinder to your favour of the 25th Novr. last, altho’ in that war of recrimination I was long since offered the Alliance of my friend Jeremy Bentham; and it was literally the fact that at the hour of receiving your Letter last Evening and from that to the present, I have had more of Correspondence to attend to than for any week together in the...
If a man were to note the Coincidencies of his day, he might find a bookful of amusement in the evening of Life. Poring yesterday over an old Correspondence, I had just reached the following Viz “Had the Dollars arrived, I dare say they would have fallen to 3/ an ounce, and if I were to send an expedition to Pandæmonium to bring away the Roof in a Hurricane, Gold would fall to the same price....
The wind did chop round and blew a Hurricane; but the Albion sailed from L’pool, & how my Letter of the 2nd. will be transmitted thence I know not. I have put a Copy on board this ship; and now, on further reflection, I take the liberty to trouble you with Copies of the Letters referred to therein. In the Letter of Mr. B. Joy’s Agent at Washington (a Mr: Alexr. Bliss, partner of Mr Webster of...
I purchased, some three years ago, the first volume of the Histoire de l’Esprit revolutionaire des nobles en France, and left an Order with my french Bookseller here to send me the second as soon as it should arrive; intending after perusal to pass them to you. To various enquiries since, I have received various answers—the last of which was that they did not believe it would be published at...
I left town before it was known what Letter Bags might float ashore from the Albion; some having found their way at intervals to London. On my return Mr Rush has informed me that he has every reason to suppose there were Despatches on board her for him; and as two regular Ships have since arrived, I send this merely to apprize you that anything you may have favored me with by that Conveyance...
I have not seen Mr: Rush since the Packet Liverpool was a missing Ship; but Mr: Maury whom I met here at dinner on sunday last had seen him that morning and was informed by him that there was a long arrear of information due to him from Washington; and we are now advised that the abovementioned packet was sunk by the Ice on the Banks of Newfoundland. It would be against the doctrine of...
Neither Captn. Pott, nor his Broker could refer me to any Bookseller that was shipping by the Henry Clay, or I should have got him to add the Books for you to his Invoice and instruct his Correspondent to transmit them to you. Mr Rush had made no Ceremony of sending a Book occasionally to a public Character thro’ the Department of State in a Letter. Colo: Aspinwall said that Books were often...
I wrote you on the 30th Ult: to take the first Conveyance from London or Liverpool; and I now find my Letter will go by the Packet of the 8th Inst. from the latter port, for which this may possibly be in time. I ought to have added, as I had here no Copy of my Letter to Captn. Pott, that my Instructions to him were to change the direction of the parcel from his name to yours and either send it...
I have sent you from time to time such Newspapers as appeared most interesting: the last being of yesterday. And by the Scipio Captn Gary I sent to the care of Messrs. D. W. & C. Warwick of Richmond a Case J.M. No 1 containing the Prints of the Battles of Bunkers Hill & Quebec, and the two Volumes Esprit Revolutionaire &ca., of which I wrote you; with instructions to pass it to you by such...
Your letter of the 10th Novr. reached me only on the 17th Inst.—the anniversary of one of the battles of which I shipped you the picture with the Duplicate of the Book of which it announces the receipt. I had heard of the wreck of the Scipio long after it occurred; and, as there seemed a sort of fatality attending my efforts to place the Book in your possession, I had ordered a third...
This paper has met with an accident, but I cannot find a new one. They are all bought up; which is not unfrequently the case on the opening of Parliament. It has led my eye however to an Article, which I should not have noticed, after reading through the Debates. I think I wrote you some time ago of little Moore’s Conversion. Whether this is from himself or not I have not yet learned; neither...
I cover this Paper because it contains, I fear too true a Picture of France. I remember to have written to you, some twenty years ago, I am afraid with more levity than was becoming, that that People did not know a Bill of Rights from a Cabbage Plant —meaning the Mass, for surely they have had men among them that understood the Principles of Civil Liberty— but in fact they are not a thinking...
I sent you on the 4th Ult: the Debates on the King’s Speech; and I now cover to your address those on the Motion of the Marquess of Lansdown. I also annex Extracts from my Correspondence with Mr. Adams to which my recollection has been called by the speech of Lord Ellenborough. It is as well to know the true Case; which his Lordship evidently does not know. It is indeed very possible that...
It is long since I had the pleasure of addressing you, and still longer since I had that of hearing from you. The Time was when I should have troubled you with a long narrative of my political movements; but I have great repugnance to invading your repose:— otherwise I could have sent you half a Dozen folio Sheets of Correspondence with the Powers that be; in which you would recognize...
Should the Bearer Mr. James C. Fuller extend his travels to the peaceful shades of your retreat, you will greatly oblige me by giving him such countenance and advice as you may judge useful to a Gentleman Farmer, of the Society of friends, seeking where in the U. S. he may best pitch his Tent. He goes with his Son to survey the whole ground and judge for himself of the expediency of shipping...
It would be grateful to me to hear more from you than falls to my lot in these latter days. My last communication was conditional. I enclosed to Gales & Seton, under cover and open to Mr Livingston, a Times newspaper of the 5th. of feby 1833 containing a letter signed Senex, which I had sent to the Editor some 14 night before and which he had kept till he could make up his mind to an analogous...
I wrote you on the 4th ⅌ Philadelphia Packet enclosing copy of a letter of ancient date to my Brother, in which I believe the words "to Hamburg" after the words "in the Launch" in the 1st page were omitted by the copyist. There is a panegyric on Lafayette, in the Times of this morning, which I suppose will be transferred to the American Papers, in which the Author expresses his wonder that he...
I received with the greater satisfaction your kind letter of the 8th Ult. as those which it answered had not left England many days before I learnt by the papers that the state of your health was such as to leave it very problematical whether they would reach you at all; and though subsequent advices announced your convalescence, the accounts were not such as to flatter me with the hope of...
I have just rec’d from Mr Scrope, one of the M. Ps for this County, a Pamphlet sent him ex officio. I have made some short hand marginal Notes upon it which I have not time to transcribe, and they would be little worth if I had; but I have ordered one of the Pamphlets to be sent to you from London, where, I suppose, they are by this time on Sale. The short of the Story I take to be this. The...
"There is no knowing who will be Governor till after Election," as they say in New England; and the question who will be Speaker of the H. C. is equally doubtful. In the abstract it is of small import: for as Lenthall said he must have no eyes nor ears but those of the House. But as a trial of the strength of parties I hold it no small matter. The appearance of the day is in favor of the...
I find there is an oppy for Letters to reach the Packet of the 16th at Portsmouth. I have therefore had my Notes on the Relations with France transferred from the Shorthand, and cover them herein. If they reach the Coffee House in time, you will get them by the same Ship that takes my Letter of the 16th. I suppose the question of the Speakership is settled, and that by this Ship you will hear...
The above is copied from the Times 1 and more in detail than the announcement in the Sunday Times which I have sent you because it contains the substance of the debates in less tedious compass than the daily papers. I shall watch the motions of the bill: if it embrace completely the object of my Letter to Sir James Graham à la bonne heure; if not I shall find the means to suggest amendments....
In my Letter of the 4th Inst. there is an Error in transcribing from the shorthand draft: for "disparage" in the 2nd paragraph the Copyist has written "discourage". I may add that I see nothing yet to change my opinion on the Subject referred to, nor in what I apprehended would be the course of the discussions on the question between the U. S. and the french: tho’ I do not perceive in the...
I have two members watching the progress of the Registration and Impressment Bills; and I shall leave to the Press to inform you what is passing in publick on that subject with the more Confidence; as I presume the Editors in the U. S. will suffer nothing bearing upon it to escape them. The enclosed Copy of a Letter, I have sent to Lord John Russell, will show the project which I had suggested...
I have been near committing a great Faux pas. The Times of the 9th reported merely that the Seamen’s Enlistment Bill went through the Committee and the report was ordered to be received on Wednesday following. As none of the points were discussed in the House I concluded of course that it was the Bill of Sir James Graham to which Lord John Russell had before assented and which in my letter to...