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    • Carey, Mathew
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    • post-Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Carey, Mathew" AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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I take the liberty to send you by this Mail, three numbers of a series of Essays, in which I have undertaken to expose the fallacy & deception of the nullifiers of South Carolina, who, most assuredly, are determined to Separate from the union, "peaceably if they can—forcibly if they must." I am persuaded that the danger is greatly underrated, & therefore greatly increased by our Citizens...
By this Mail, I send you three numbers of a series of papers, intended to dispel the delusions under which many of the Citizens of the Southern States, particularly in South Carolina & Georgia, labour, respecting the Tariff. I am flattered by my friends into the belief that I have taken impregnable ground. With them I send some other articles of my writing, the whole of which I request you...
I have for many years deeply regretted, that numerous pamphlets, published in Great Britain, admirably calculated to promote the happiness and prosperity of society, are never republished here; and as only a few copies of pamphlets are imported, they are almost altogether unknown to our citizens--I have likewise regretted that many pamphlets and essays of a similar character, written and...
By this Mail, I take the liberty of sending you some essays on the Protecting System, of which I request your acceptance. Their object, & that of some other of my pamphlets is to allay the fermentation that exists in South Carolina & Georgia, wh. is so assiduously excited and kept alive by misguided or wicked men Very respectfully, your obt. hble. Servt RC (DLC) . Docketed by JM.
By this mail, I send you a number of copies of two essays on the protecting System, which I request you will be so good to hand to the Messenger of the Convention to be delivered to the members. I remain, Sir, very respectfully, Your obt hble Servt RC (DLC) . Docketed by JM, with this note: "The delivery disclosed the papers being tracked and likely to be viewed as of a party character."
I take the liberty to submit the annexed circular to your consideration, with a hope that you may find leisure to furnish me with some materials for the plan it unfolds. There is a wonderful change in the spirit of the nation since the revolution. We have become a sordid people. Money & office are our Gods. It is desirable to erect a mound against the further progress of this miserable...
Although I know you are borne down with an extensive correspondence, I take the liberty to trespass on you with the annexed letter, not doubting that you must be favourable to the object in view, & also that you must be able to [provide] me with some materials to enable me to carry it into effect. I send by this mail some of my most recent lucubrations, of which I request your acceptance, and...
I am given to understand that there will shortly be a vacancy in the Chair of professor of the Classics, & beg leave to present to your view, & to recommend to your support, Mr M. L. Tracie, a gentleman whom I have every reason to believe perfectly qualified to fill the station with credit to himself & advantage to the institution. He had a regular collegiate education in Dublin, & has the...
I send you by this mail some of my recent lucubrations, of which I request your acceptance. I flatter myself into the hope that some of the facts & reasonings on them, will fully establish the soundness of the Hamiltonian System of policy, of which I have been the unceasing advocate for nine years. Until it is fully adopted by this Country, we shall never enjoy the high degree of prosperity...
I have duly recd your favour of the 7th. I now send you a dozen Copies of two Essays on a subject of deep importance to the welfare of the Southern states, of which I have printed 1000 for gratuitous distribution. I shall have far more disciples on this Subject, to the South than on the Tariff, although I am fully persuaded my doctrines on the latter Subject are fully as correct as on the...
I send you by this Mail, and request your acceptance & (if liesure permit) your perusal of some of my lucubrations, on a subject which has occupied three fourths of my thought & time, for nearly nine years—i. e. the best means of promoting "the wealth, power & resources" of the nation & the happiness & prosperity of its Citizens. In these labours I had no personal interest to serve, as I never...
A very great error has escaped me the Essay on Slave Labour, which I forwarded you yesterday, and which I wish you to destroy. I send a number of corrected Copies to replace them—and am respectfully Your obt. hble. Servt RC (DLC) . Docketed by James Madison.
By this mail, I send you 30 copies of an essay on a Subject of vast importance to your State, & to the Southern states generally. I request you will circulate them as widely as possible. Some errors may probably be found my estimate—but will not, I am persuaded, affect the general result. I likewise send a few other articles, of which I request your acceptance. I retired from business nearly...
I take the liberty of sending by this mail some recent publications, all of my writing, except two marked P & S. the first by R Peters, Esqr the second by Mr Strickland. If you can furnish me with any materials for the Annals, I shall be thankful for them. Respectfully Your obt. hble. servt RC ( DLC ). Docketed by JM . One of the “recent publications” was [Mathew Carey], Annals of Liberality,...
You will, I doubt not, have the goodness to pardon the liberty I take, in the present letter, from the motives which lead to it, to serve a valuable citizen, & to promote the utility of some one of the great public institutions in your state, devoted to education on a large scale. Mr. John Saunderson, of this city, whom I regard as eminently qualified for a professorship of the learned...
I have duly recd & carefully read your favour of the 11th. ult. & confess I regret extremely the view you have taken of the situation of the Country, & the operation of the tariff Bill. It is not a manufacturing question. It is a national one—& all the complicated distress, which, with few exceptions, pervades the Country, arises from regarding it in the former light. Out of an absurd jealousy...
By this mail I send you a copy of a recent pamphlet, which I beseech you by all your hopes of honour & reputation here, & of happiness hereafter, to read with attention—& should it convince you of the deleterious consequences of the miserable policy this Country pursues, that you will try to open the eyes of some of the influential members of Congress to the necessity of a radical change. Very...
By this Mail, I forward you three pamphlets, of which I request your acceptance—& am respectfully, Your obt. hble. servt RC ( DLC ). These pamphlets have not been identified.
I inclose three copies of No. 1 of a Set of papers, the object of which I trust you can not but approve. Should you favour me with any communications towards continuing the plan, they will be regarded as a favour conferred on Your obt. hble. Servt RC ( PPPrHi ). The enclosure was probably Carey’s To the Citizens of the U. States. No. 1. … (Philadelphia, 1823; Shoemaker Richard H. Shoemaker,...
I enclose two Numbers of a new series of papers, intended to shew the ruinous policy pursued by this Country whereby our resources are lavished to support the industry & governments of foreign nations. Will you have the goodness to inform me what is the present state of tobacco planting generally in Va.? Whether it remunerates the labours of the planter, & affords him a handsome interest for...
By this mail, I send you two copies each of No. 2 & 3 of Hamilton, new series. No. 1 was forwarded some time since. For the sake of your country and your reputation, I beseech you reflect deeply on this subject—& I hope you will see there is but one course can save our country—that is, adopting the policy which has wrought wonders for Great Britain, France & every country which has followed...
I enclose you some numbers of Hamilton—& hope, when you have given the subject a full and complete consideration, that you will agree that there is but one way to insure the prosperity & happiness of the Country, and that is by adopting the restrictive and protecting system which has elevated Great Britain to the towering height where she has stood for half a century, so far beyond what her...
I have duly recd your favour of the 25th ult. and have read it with the attention to which the writer & the subject are entitled. You will pardon me for stating that I think you have greatly overrated the difficulties in the way of a sound system of policy for this Country, wh. would cure all its evils, & place it on the exalted ground, to which its immense advantages, natural moral, &...
By this day’s mail, I take the liberty of sending you a pamphlet on the policy that prevails in our intercourse with foreign nations —a policy which renders us hewers of wood and drawers of water to the manufacturing nations of Europe. We give the labour of 30, 40, or 50 farmers & or planters for that of one cotton manufacturer. The low price of the produce of the earth, & the glutted markets,...
I am writing some essays on the situation & policy of this Country, previous to the revolution—and am desirous of obtaining information on the following points. Was the balance of trade between Great Britain & the southern Colonies, particularly Va. against the latter? Was there a heavy balance due from the Colonies to Great Britain? Can you form any idea of the amount? Your obt. hble. servt....
I have duly recd your kind favour of the 26th ult. which want of leisure has prevented me from answering earlier. Next to the delightful & cheering testimony of a man’s own Conscience, in favour of any course of conduct, is the approbation of gentlemen of high standing, of full capacity to judge, & free from the suspicion of another bias. It is not therefore extraordinary that I prize very...
By this day’s mail, I take the liberty of sending you a set of papers, intended to prove the pernicious effects of our present policy on the best interests of the agriculturists generally. Hoping it may meet with your approbation, I remain, respectfully, Your obt. hble. Servt. RC and enclosure ( DLC ). Addressed in an unidentified hand to JM, and franked. The RC , docketed by JM, is written on...
I take the liberty to send you a Copy of the Addresses of the Philadelphia Society for the protection of National Industry, of which I request your acceptance, & am, respectfully, Your obt. hble. servt. RC ( DLC ). Addressed by Carey to JM at Montpelier and franked. Docketed by JM. Addresses of the Philadelphia Society for the Promotion of National Industry , 4th ed., (Philadelphia, 1819; Shaw...