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    • Cabell, Joseph C.
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    • post-Madison Presidency
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    • Madison, James

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Documents filtered by: Author="Cabell, Joseph C." AND Period="post-Madison Presidency" AND Correspondent="Madison, James"
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At a called meeting of the Visitors of the Central College, held at the House of Mr. Madison in Orange, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Hartwell Cocke, and Joseph C. Cabell, being present: The plan of the first Pavilion to be erected, and the proceedings thereupon, having been stated and agreed to— It is agreed that application be made to Doctor Knox of Baltimore to accept the...
As soon after the afflicting scene produced by the death of my mother as I could find time to write I have copied the enclosed papers for the loan of which I return you my sincere thanks. It is to be regretted that such tables are not kept at all the colleges along the atlantic Coast, as well. They would soon throw abundant light on the nature of our climate. I have sent subscription papers...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. held at Charlottesville 7. Oct: 1817. On information of the amount of the subscriptions to the Central College, known to be made, and others understood to be so, the board resolves, that the Pavilion now erecting be completed as heretofore directed, with the 20. dormitories attached to it, and that two other pavilions be contracted for and executed the next...
At a meeting of the Visitors &c. 8. Oct: 1817. Certain letters from Doctor Thos. Cooper to Th: Jefferson, dated Sep. 17. & 19. received since the meeting of yesterday being communicated to the board of Visitors, and taken into consideration with his former letter of Sep. 16. they are of opinion that it will be for the interest of the College to modify the terms of agreement which might be...
I enclose you a printed copy of Mr. Jefferson’s Bill on public Education, because I think it would give you pleasure to read any thing from his pen, and for the reason that the subject will probably receive a great share of public attention in the course of the present year. This bill has been rejected in the House of Delegates by a very large majority in favor of a Bill making provision for...
At a regular meeting of the Visitors of the Central College on 11th. May 1818, at which Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John H. Cocke, & Joseph C. Cabell, were present, it was agreed, that it being uncertain whether Thomas Cooper would accept the Professorship of Chemistry, in the event of his not doing so, it would be expedient to procure a Professor of Mathematicks. It was also agreed to...
When I last had the pleasure to see you at Monticello you appeared to approve of the plan which I had suggested to Mr. Jefferson for augmenting the funds of the University by applying to the legislature for the balance of the debt due to the state from the General Government. I then mentioned to you that subsequent to the period at which I had addressed Mr. Jefferson on that subject I had...
It would have given me great pleasure to write you from time to time the state of our business in the Assembly, and I should have done so, but that my constitution was scarcely able to support the pressure of my regular duties. In the interview which I shall have the pleasure to have with you at Monticello in April, I will give you any details you may desire respecting past transactions &...
In travelling down the country Mr. Loyall & myself had much conversation together on the plan & interior distribution of the Library House. I take the liberty to express to you the solicitude we feel on the structure of the two large oval rooms, and on the arrangment of a suitable apartment or apartments for the Philosophical apparatus. I infer from what Mr. Jefferson said to us, that the oval...
In my way from Charlottesville to this place on yesterday, I called at Monticello and passed an hour in conversation with Mr. Jefferson on the subject of the University. I was sorry to learn from him that Mr. Barbour had finally declined to accept the Law Chair. General Tucker had already apprized me of his inability to accede to our proposals. We are therefore once more left without any...
I regret that the communication of Mr. Trist of 7th inst relative to your report to the Legislature, after being retarded on its way, should have reached me in the midst of the troubles of my brother’s sale, the cares of which have totally absorbed my attention for about ten days past. I write now chiefly to assure you that nothing could afford me more pleasure than to offer to you any aid in...
I have received in due time by the mail your favor of 13th inst, and would have written you immediately in reply, but have waited for the arrival of the Report so as to enable me to relieve your anxiety in regard to that subject. Two days ago I received a letter from Mr. Trist, stating that he had at length determined to send on the Report without the revised copy of the enactments, but that...
The Assembly rose on the 9th inst. after a session of 96 days. I hasten at the first leisure moment to account to you for my apparent inattention of late. It has proceeded entirely from my absence from this place on a journey to Philadelphia with a deranged brother, which occupied my time from the 11th Feb. till the 2nd. inst. His removal to the Hospital in that city seemed to be a measure of...
Yours of the 24. Ulto. upon the subject of Mr. Longs appointment in the University of London, and communicating his wish to be released from his engagement to us after the expiration of the present course of Lectures at the University of Virginia, came duly to hand. There is but one view of the subject, which produces a moments hesitation upon my part, in a prompt & full compliance with Mr....
On conference with Genl. Cocke we are of opinion that the resignation of Mr. Long at the end of the present session should be acceded to, with an assurance that whilst we are not willing to insist on the complete fulfillment of his contract with our University at the cost of the proffered promotion in London, yet we are very unwilling to be deprived of the benefit of his talents & services for...
On my return home I found Mr. Tucker growing worse, and you have since heard of his death. Shortly after this afflicting scene had occurred I was compelled to hurry down to Corrottoman to procure some additional evidence in support of our claim for slaves carried off during the late war. It is only within the last few days I have had time to attend to my promise to you. Before I left home, I...
Your favor of 28th ult has been duly received. I thank you for the facts in relation to the Constitutionality of the Tariff, the more especially as I have reasons to believe that Governor Giles encouraged by the pamphlet containing the late proceedings at Boston, will again bring that subject before us. I have communicated to him your message relative to the Journals said to be in the...
I applied to the Executive thro’ one of its members for a copy of the 1st. vol: of the Public Journals—for your use. No law having passed authorizing the disposition to be made of them, and none being expedient till the whole of the work shall be completed, the Executive had no power to present a Copy to any one. I desired that one might be sent you on loan, till the Legislature shall pass a...
I suppose you have been notified of your appointment as Visitor of the University for the current term. But it is possible that you may not be apprized that the first monday in April, was fixed upon, for the first meeting of the Board, merely because the Law makes it the duty of the Executive to appoint a time for the first meeting, previous to the slated meetings. At first, I suggested to the...
Your favor of 27th ult, went first to Williamsburg, & has been forwarded to me at this place. I have deferred my answer, under the hope that every succeeding week would terminate my stay in this City, and from a belief that I could make a more satisfactory reply, after seeing the papers in the possession of Mr. Johnson. But my business may drag on still for some weeks, and I now write in order...
I have reflected much since our separation on the subject of the Professorship of Ancient Languages, the importance of which to the University seems to be seen and felt by all; and a thought has occurred to me which seems to me worth something and, to suggest it to you, is the main object of the present note. It is, the expediency of sounding Mr. Key, thro’ Mr. Long, as to the practicability...
Your favor of 18 Ult., reached me by the last mail. On the subject of the Tilghman white wheat, I deem it proper to write you by the return of the mail, in order that you may not be put to inconvenience on my account. Having an Agent in Baltimore for the sale of my crops below, I have thought it would be best to get him to send me a parcel of the Tilghman wheat. I presume it can be had in...
I shall see you so shortly that I would not now write, were it not for your express desire that I should do so. Your letter on the Tariff came to hand by the last mail, and has been read with the deepest interest. It is a paper < > so important, & so especially calculated to correct the unhappy state of the public mind to the South, that you must consent to its publication. I felt strongly...
I am detained here as a witness in the suit of Mrs. Carter & Mr. Galt, but hope to be released by tomorrow. Shortly after I received your Letter of Sepr. 18, relative to the Tariff, I replied to you, and whilst I acknowledged the great satisfaction afforded by that letter, I begged your permission to send it to the press. Since the date of my reply, I have under proper precautions, shewn the...
Your favor of 5. inst reached me by the last mail from the North: and I confess, filled me with regret. From your silence I had drawn the inference that you had determined to leave me to pursue my own inclination in regard to your letter of the 18th Sep. and I had made up my mind to encounter the abuse of the presses hostile to your doctrines, for giving publicity to your opinions without...
Your favor of the 30th ult has reached me in safety by a late mail; and I seize the earliest opportunity to convey to you the assurance of my heartfelt gratitude for the increased obligations conferred upon me. Your last letter, on the policy of the Tariff, is a happy sequel to your First, on the Right of Congress to adopt the measure; and both together, make up a body of doctrine, which will...
Your favor of the 10th inst. has just reached me by the mail; and least you may be in doubt as to its safe arrival, I have thought it proper to acknowledge its receipt, and to assure you that the instruction relative to the 7th. paragraph of your letter of 30 Oct: on the policy of the Tariff, has been complied with. I copied it at the foot of your last letter which I shall preserve, and then...
Your favor of 22d. came to hand by the last mail, and in full time for the purpose contemplated. The correction and addition directed in regard to your letters of the 18th Sepr. and the 30th Oct: have been made. Should any thing further occur to you, be pleased to direct to me at Richmond. Some time next week I shall set out for that place, having been detained longer at home this fall than...
I received by the last mail your favor of 26 ult: and have this moment finished all the corrections desired by you in regard to your letters of the 18th Sepr. & 30 Oct. These letters now stand exactly as you desired in your three last favors of 10th, 22d. & 26th Nov. and the erasures, & additions, are so introduced, that they will produce no difficulty with the printer. Should any others occur...
Your favor of 5. inst was in the post office at this place, when I arrived on the 18th. I lost no time in conferring with some of my friends as to the proper time & place of publishing your Letters on the Tariff: and it was agreed that as to time, the earliest was the best, and as to place, that the seat of the national government, and the National Intelligencer, would be the most proper....
I have deferred answering your favor of the 5th inst. much longer than I intended because my time of late has been much engrossed by the concluding duties of my public service. I return you heartfelt thanks for your opinion relative to the basis of Representation, which will have the greatest weight with me in shaping my course on the very important subject to which it relates. The Bill is now...
I fear my long silence in regard to your last letters of the 2d. and 15th inst. may have induced you to think me ungrateful & inattentive. It has arisen, I assure you, from the pressure of my public duties, and from ill health. I was in the Senate yesterday to vote upon the Tariff Resolutions, after a confinement to my bed for some days, and I am again confined to my chamber. For two or three...
I am now able to furnish the information you lately desired relative to the authority on which the Editor of the Enquirer stated in that paper some time ago that you and Mr. Jefferson were privy to the publication to the piece written by Mr. Pendleton signed or headed "The Danger not over". At my request Genl. Dade last evening made the enquiry of Mr. Ritchie: who said he would willingly give...
I send you by the mail which will bring you this, a copy of the pamphlet containing your letters, with the additional documents respecting Mr. Jefferson’s opinions, suggested to me by Mr. Rives. 2000 copies had been printed before these were handed to the printer. He then printed 500 Copies with the extra appendix. And the latter will go with all future copies. I received a letter from Mr....
I went out of the house yesterday for the first time, since my arrival at this time: but my health is still in a feeble state, and it will probably be some weeks before I shall be able to resume my usual private pursuits. I do not take the Enquirer, and therefore am often ignorant of what is said in that paper. I filed away the numbers of Mr. Giles’s commentaries upon your letters, as far as...
I received by yesterday’s mail your favor of 19 inst. and lose no time in acknowledging the relief it has afforded to my mind. To save you trouble I will recall the request that you will furnish me with copies of my letters requesting you to write me on the subject of the Tariff, and desiring permission to publish your letters. Before your letter of 19th inst. reached me, I had very much...
I have put off copying my letters which you were so good as to send me under cover of yours of the 4th March, and I have done so with the less hesitancy, because I had much writing to do in a debilitated state of health, and I supposed that their immediate return was of no importance to you. I write now, just on the eve of my departure for Corottoman, to say, that as it will be a convenience...
I regret, in common with all the Board, that your present delicate state of health should deprive us of the gratification of your company at the University. Col: Monroe, on his return home, will hand you the letters you were good enough to lend me, of which I have taken copies & filed with my papers. I have determined to publish in some of our newspapers, Chaptal’s two chapters on the Tariff,...
Since writing you my late letter from this place by Col: Monroe, I have received from the post office at this place, a letter from Mr. Richard Morris of Hanover, under date of 12th inst. of which the following is an extract: "Your letter of 2[3d]. of last month, in consequence of being mislaid in Mr. Johnson’s office, did not reach me until yesterday friday last. It will not now be in my power...
May I take the liberty to ask that you will be so good as to read the enclosed pamphlet, and to inform me whether the argument in the speech respecting the rights of the parties to the Compact, be sound and in conformity to your own views of the subject, and if there be error, where & to what extent, it exists. The subject is very important, & the views here taken. of it, somewhat new, and...
I have just received the enclosed letter from Mr. Morris, & as it relates altogether to the subject of your enquiry, I have thought it proper to enclose it to you. I am sorry that it should be so unsatisfactory. It is probable that I shall hear again from Mr. M. on this subject; in which event, I will write you immediately. Should you still desire to engage my services on this or any other...
Anti Tariff Resolutions adopted by the Legislature of Virginia. At the Session of 1825.6. "1. Be it therefore resolved, That the imposition of taxes and duties by the Congress of the U. States, for the purpose of protecting and encouraging domestic manufactures, is an unconstitutional exercise of power, and is highly oppressive & partial in its operation." At the session of 1826.7. "2....
It would have afforded me much gratification to have an opportunity of occasionally conversing with you in a confidential manner during my short stay in this place. But the structure of this boarding House & the circumstances under which we are placed, seem to render it impracticable to touch on private topics. I have therefore determined to write you a few hasty lines. I should have written...
I arrived here on the 13th, and have been prevented from prosecuting my intended journey to the Northern Neck, by an inflammation in the face from which I have suffered some pain & a good deal of confinement. I am nearly recovered from it, & propose to proceed to Lancaster immediately after christmas. In this posture of my affairs, I am overtaken here by the news of the appointment of Mr....
Your Circular of the 30th ult. came to hand by the last mail, and I hasten to send in my answer by its return. Mr. Lomax’s proposal to combine the discharge of the duties of the Judicial office just accepted by him, with the continuation of his Law Lectures at the University, till the end of the present course, is in my opinion, a happy expedient to relieve the board of Visitors from a...
I returned to this place last evening from the northern neck, after an absence of three weeks. I received your favor of 10th Apl. with Mr. Grimke’s pamphlet just before I set out on my journey, and should have written you sooner, but for the mass of business which has engrossed my attention in the interval, & my frequent & rapid journies. On my arrival here I took up the Conl. Whig of the...
I have been retarded in my return home by unexampled occupation & several bilious attacks. I have received at this place your favor of 31st. May, & read it with the highest gratification. I am on my way home with Mrs. Cabell, and shall scarcely get to Charlottesville till tuesday evening. I regret exceedingly the necessity of being absent. I enclose you confidentially Genl. Cocke’s letter of...
I herewith enclose you two letters relative to the place of assistant to the Professor of Modern Languages. Col: La Pena is one of the unfortunate Spanish Patriots who have taken refuge in our country, and his situation is such that I would be happy to render him a friendly service. He now holds the rank of a professor at Wm. & Mary, but has neither salary nor fees; for I believe he has no...
Your favour of Sep 12 was duly received by the mail. That part of it which relates to Doctr. Blatterman’s difficulties will be best attended to, when I visit the University about the middle of next week, which will result from the circumstance of my being summoned as a witness at that time in the suit of Galt v. Carter in the Superior Court of Albemarle. I will call upon the Doctr: & Col....
I set out from this place for Charlottesville on the [11]th & returned home on the 17th inst., having spent a part of the 15th & 16th at the University. The difficulty as to the boundary of duties between Doct: Blatterman & Col: Colonna appeared no longer to exist. I did not see the latter, as he resided without the precincts, at Xaup[i]’s, and there was no particular reason why I should call...